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Old Feb 15, '12, 8:53 am
DavidPalm DavidPalm is offline
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Default Re: Was Jesus also the Messiah for the Jews?

Quote:
Originally Posted by YanniP View Post
I would be very careful recommending that article. There are significant errors in it, and conclusions that simply are not Catholic teaching. I'm amazed that they got it published. The authors attempt to slide in the recent heresy of claiming Jews as racial Jews have an eternal covenant that was not abrogated or fulfilled in Christ. That is simply not the case. Jews are loved by God because of the promise to Abraham fulfilled in Christ, like all men, not because of the blood running through their veins. That is why circumcision was superseded, to eliminate the separation. There is no more Jew or Greek for salvation, all men are drawn by Christ, without whom there is no salvation.
I don't mean to side-track the thread, but YanniP (who seems to have joined CAF just to criticize this article) could not have actually read it before making such claims about what it says. Far from attempting "to slide in the recent heresy of claiming Jews as racial Jews have an eternal covenant that was not abrogated or fulfilled in Christ", the article repeatedly rejects the dual-covenant heresy. Here are some quotes from the article:
The New Covenant in Christ has superseded the Mosaic (or “Old”) covenant. The term ‘supersession,’ which was first used by an Anglican minister, has subsequently been used by some Catholics to describe this truth. It appears in no magisterial texts; yet, as originally used, it does accurately describe Catholic teaching.

The first, commonly known as the dual covenant theory, holds not only that the Jewish people retain a special relationship with God (which is true), but also that they have their own path to salvation through Judaism and therefore do not need to be—and should not be—presented with the Gospel and invited to expressly enter the Church (which is false).

While the Church continues to grapple with certain nuances in the relationship among Jews, Christians, and God, she has never taught the dual covenant theory

the dual covenant theory…fundamentally compromises the Church’s Great Commission, given by Christ (cf. Mt. 28:18–20). Additionally, the public advocacy of this theory has created an unwarranted expectation among our Jewish brethren that in turn leads to their understandable frustration each time the Church reaffirms that the Gospel and the Church are for all men.

the dual covenant theory holds…that [the Jewish people] have their own path to salvation through Judaism and therefore do not need to be—and should not be—presented with the Gospel and invited to expressly enter the Church (which is false).

The Scriptures, the Fathers, and the Magisterium consistently testify that the Good News of Jesus Christ and His Church is for all men—Jew and Gentile alike.

God has given man one sure path to salvation, and that path is through the definitive and universal covenant in Jesus Christ by means of His Church. It is a serious error to direct anyone away from that sure path, regardless of the intention.

Since Vatican II, in continuity with magisterial teaching such as the Council of Florence (1439) and Mystici Corporis (1943), the Church has consistently reaffirmed the universality of the Gospel and the Church. [11] In Lumen Gentium (1964), the Church affirmed that God “chose the race of Israel as a people” and “set up a covenant” with them, instructing them and making them holy. However, “all these things . . . were done by way of preparation and as a figure of that new and perfect covenant” instituted by and ratified in Christ (no. 9). In Notes on the Correct Way to Present the Jews and Judaism (1985), we read that the “Church and Judaism cannot then be seen as two parallel ways of salvation and the Church must witness to Christ as the Redeemer of all.”

The specific, external form of the Mosaic covenant—such as the legal prescriptions and the temple sacrifice of animals—was indeed abolished with the commencement of the New Covenant. But the underlying substance—from the moral precepts to the foundational principles of sacrifice and worship—is fulfilled and transformed by Christ. In and through Christ, the Mosaic covenant is thus actualized and subsumed into the New Covenant.
For those who might be interested, I have written another article which lays out additional evidence from Scripture and the Magisterium on this topic here.

But directly to the thread topic, as we said in the article, yes Jesus Christ is most certainly the Messiah for the Jews.