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  #1  
Old Jan 18, '10, 2:47 am
Ora_et_Labora Ora_et_Labora is offline
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Question Reconciling vocations

First of all, let me say that I do not wish to be argumentative. I do not wish to start an argument on the merits of this or that vocation over others; I ask out of a desire to know, to clear up any confusion that I may have. Having said that, I ask all those would see this as provocative to refrain from posting replies.

My question is not about religious vocations in particular, but about vocations in general, namely the call to love God. How exactly does one reconcile that with other aspects of one's life? For example, if one desires a life of deep, prayerful union with God, how does one reconcile that with the married life, where attention must also be given to the spouse and eventual children? Also, is it possible in finding a profession that suits one's abilities to find God (and to serve as an icon as well) through that profession? I sometimes think that the lack of married clerics in the West (i.e., Latin Church) mars one vision of the more general calling. Or are these things different degrees of calling? Can we explain this by saying that God only calls us to levels of commitment with Him - of love - that are within our possibilities (i.e., of who we are)?

Anyway, my questions arise from my particular experience. I feel a deep desire of union with God through prayer, to try to serve as an icon of His love; I wish to share and spread the joy He has given me. Yet I sometimes wonder if my ability (or should I say availability) to do all these things will not be impaired when/if I eventually constitute family. I have a normal job still something says that it is not through it that I will find God, at least not in the way I desire. To spend most of my time spreading His Word, His Love, His "hessed", that seems to be what would truly complete me.
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  #2  
Old Jan 18, '10, 5:40 am
DihydrogenOxide DihydrogenOxide is offline
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Default Re: Reconciling vocations

You may want to read up on saints. St. Rita of Cascia and Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton along with many other religious were married prior to eventually entering the religious life.

Whatever God wills to call you to will give you the most joy. Whatever he wishes should be highest in your heart. Pray to discern your vocation so that what He wants will be clear to you.

Married life is beautiful. You love God by loving your children and your husband, along with prayer and going to Mass, etc. Marriage by no means puts you in a position to honor God less.

Religious life has different charisms, but you will need to interact with others. You also honor God through your actions towards others along with your prayer daily.

Single life is another vocation which you also are expected to use both words of prayers and good actions toward others.

Whatever vocation you choose, you still have the opportunity for closer intimacy with God.

Whatever God wills you to be, will make you closest to Him. Don't worry and pray.
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  #3  
Old Jan 18, '10, 6:30 am
spirfem spirfem is offline
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Default Re: Reconciling vocations

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ora_et_Labora View Post
First of all, let me say that I do not wish to be argumentative. I do not wish to start an argument on the merits of this or that vocation over others; I ask out of a desire to know, to clear up any confusion that I may have. Having said that, I ask all those would see this as provocative to refrain from posting replies.

My question is not about religious vocations in particular, but about vocations in general, namely the call to love God. How exactly does one reconcile that with other aspects of one's life? For example, if one desires a life of deep, prayerful union with God, how does one reconcile that with the married life, where attention must also be given to the spouse and eventual children? Also, is it possible in finding a profession that suits one's abilities to find God (and to serve as an icon as well) through that profession? I sometimes think that the lack of married clerics in the West (i.e., Latin Church) mars one vision of the more general calling. Or are these things different degrees of calling? Can we explain this by saying that God only calls us to levels of commitment with Him - of love - that are within our possibilities (i.e., of who we are)?

Anyway, my questions arise from my particular experience. I feel a deep desire of union with God through prayer, to try to serve as an icon of His love; I wish to share and spread the joy He has given me. Yet I sometimes wonder if my ability (or should I say availability) to do all these things will not be impaired when/if I eventually constitute family. I have a normal job still something says that it is not through it that I will find God, at least not in the way I desire. To spend most of my time spreading His Word, His Love, His "hessed", that seems to be what would truly complete me.
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  #4  
Old Jan 18, '10, 6:47 am
spirfem spirfem is offline
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Smile Re: Reconciling vocations


My thoughts and prayers are with you. I might suggest a wonderful book that I read on discernment ( the process of realizing, and then following, our spirital paths) which I found very helpful in a similiar situation. The title of the book is Discernment (a path to spiritual awakening) by Rose Mary Dougherty. Paulist Press
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  #5  
Old Jan 18, '10, 10:01 am
Ora_et_Labora Ora_et_Labora is offline
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Default Re: Reconciling vocations

I am not discerning any vocation in particular. My question is one born of a healthy curiosity which I think all Christians must have and also of the recognition of my failure to see beyond my own limited experience.
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