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  #16  
Old Feb 8, '10, 10:54 pm
Catholic90 Catholic90 is offline
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Default Re: Why do my eggs crack open in the fridge?

Quote:
Originally Posted by kage_ar View Post
IF you have chickens or know someone who has them and you can get fresh, unwashed eggs... you can coat them with oil and store them pointy side down (or up, I'll have to ask my food preservation expert friend) and they will last without refrigeration for a year.
A YEAR??

A raw egg coated in oil and can sit on your kitchen counter for 365 days and still be edible? ? ?

I, personally, would NEVER eat that.

From the egg site:
Quote:
Quote:
http://www.ncegg.org/EggInformation/...P/Default.aspx
Preservation

Refrigeration, drying or freezing are the best ways to preserve egg quality. Fresh eggs are so readily available that long storage periods are rarely necessary. However, centuries before modern methods of egg production, transportation and refrigeration became known, man did his ingenious best to preserve the egg intact.
The ancient Chinese stored eggs up to several years by immersion in a variety of such imaginative mixtures as salt and wet clay; cooked rice, salt and lime; or salt and wood ashes mixed with a tea infusion. Although the Chinese ate them with no ill effects of which we are aware, the eggs thus treated bore little similarity to fresh eggs, some exhibiting greenish-gray yolks and albumen resembling brown jelly.
Immersion in different liquids too numerous to mention was explored, lime water being a favorite in the 18th century. During the early 20th century, water glass was used with considerable success. Water glass, a bacteria-resistant solution of sodium silicate, discouraged the entrance of spoilage organisms and evaporation of water from eggs. It did not penetrate the egg shell, imparted no odor or taste to the eggs and was considered to have somewhat antiseptic properties. However, it did a rather poor job at relatively high storage temperatures. Eggs preserved in a water glass solution and stored in a cool place keep 8 to 9 months.
Dry packing in various substances ranging from bran to wood ashes was used occasionally, but costs of transporting the excess weight of the packing material far exceeded the dubious advantages.
In an attempt to seal the shell pores to prevent loss of moisture and carbon dioxide, a great variety of materials including cactus juice, soap and shellac were investigated with varying degrees of success. The only coating considered fairly efficient was oil which is still used today.
Thermostabilization, immersion of the egg for a short time in boiling water to coagulate a thin film of albumen immediately beneath the shell membrane, was rather extensively practice by housewives of the late 19th century. Mild heating destroyed spoilage organisms but did not cook the eggs. If kept in a cool place, thermostabilized eggs coated with oil keep several months although some mold growth may take place.
During the first half of the 20th century, storing eggs in refrigerated warehouses was a common practice. Preservation was later improved with the introduction of carbon dioxide into the cold storage atmosphere. Today, very few, if any, cold storage eggs find their way to the retail market.
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  #17  
Old Feb 9, '10, 10:20 am
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ac claire ac claire is offline
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Default Re: Why do my eggs crack open in the fridge?

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Originally Posted by Catholic90 View Post
A YEAR??

A raw egg coated in oil and can sit on your kitchen counter for 365 days and still be edible? ? ?

I, personally, would NEVER eat that.

Me neither. Although it's a very interesting bit of trivia that I didn't know. But I don't think I'd tempt fate like that.
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  #18  
Old Feb 9, '10, 10:40 am
kage_ar kage_ar is offline
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Default Re: Why do my eggs crack open in the fridge?

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Originally Posted by Catholic90 View Post
A YEAR??

A raw egg coated in oil and can sit on your kitchen counter for 365 days and still be edible? ? ?

I, personally, would NEVER eat that.
The LDS are experts on food storage.

http://preparedness.ldswelfare.org/food-preservation/97
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  #19  
Old Feb 9, '10, 11:33 am
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crazzeto crazzeto is offline
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Default Re: Why do my eggs crack open in the fridge?

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Originally Posted by ac claire View Post
Sorry for posting this in Family Life. My posts in the Water Cooler don't get as much traffic. And amazingly I was unable to find an answer on google! So, I'll buy a carton of eggs and put them in the fridge. A few days later, when I open the carton at least half of them are cracked and ruined. This happens every time. Lately I've only been getting 2-4 good eggs from a dozen.

Does anyone know what's going on and how I can fix it? My best guess is that my refrigerator may be too cold? It used to be much colder but my vegetables were freezing so I turned it down. Thought I turned it far enough, but maybe not? TIA
I've asked a friend online, and this is their best guess which I'm sure was already posted:

Quote:
assuming they checked the eggs prior to purchase and didn't squoosh them, my next guess would be to wonder if maybe the fridge is too cold
<person> it might be freezing the eggs a bit and making the runny bits expand
<person> bursting the eggs
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  #20  
Old Feb 9, '10, 1:53 pm
NoAvailableName NoAvailableName is offline
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Default Re: Why do my eggs crack open in the fridge?

Time for me to throw some eggs in my freezer and see what happens
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  #21  
Old Feb 9, '10, 2:00 pm
puzzleannie puzzleannie is offline
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Default Re: Why do my eggs crack open in the fridge?

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Originally Posted by NoAvailableName View Post
Time for me to throw some eggs in my freezer and see what happens
you can freeze eggs, either break them into a freezer container, leave at least 1/2" headroom and freeze, or beat them and freeze the mix. It will work for scrambled eggs and some baking (probably cookies but not a delicate cake). There should be no need. If they have been around a while hard boil them and store them in the fridge and use in salads, as snacks, quick breakfast, devilled, sliced on a bagel, etc.

No way am I taking a chance on eggs outside the refrigerator, they are a major source of salmonella, so make sure they are well cooked. If they were intact when they went in the refrigerator and cracked later, you can probably use them scrambled or in baking. No need to dump them as long as they will be thoroughly cooked. I would still get a thermometer, and also check insulation and gasket and clean the coils in back.
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  #22  
Old Feb 9, '10, 2:00 pm
Cristiano Cristiano is offline
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Default Re: Why do my eggs crack open in the fridge?

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Originally Posted by ac claire View Post
Thanks for the replies. I turned my fridge temp down another notch and now I'm gonna keep the eggs on the shelf inside the door for good measure. Hopefully this'll take care of the problem!
Just not to be too picky but if the fridge is too cold and your eggs break, you have to turn the temperature UP!
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