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  #1  
Old Jul 15, '10, 12:15 pm
Matt CL's Avatar
Matt CL Matt CL is offline
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Default The Glory Be to the Father prayer

I have recently noticed that sometimes the doxology prayer: Glory Be to Father will be printed as simply Glory to the Father , omitting the "Be". I am in my fifties, and I learned this prayer as "Glory Be to The Father", always containing the "Be".


I have noticed for instance that the Magnificat Magazine will omit the "Be" and just publish "Glory to the Father..."

I am curious as to why this prayer is different sometimes.
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Old Jul 15, '10, 1:29 pm
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Arrow Re: The Glory Be to the Father prayer

For some reason, there are two translations of this prayer. The Latin is:
Gloria Patri
et Fílio
et Spirítui Sancto.
Sicut erat in principio,
et nunc et semper
et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.
In most circumstances, this is translated as in the Compendium to the Catechism:
Glory be to the Father
and to the Son
and to the Holy Spirit,
as it was in the beginning
is now, and ever shall be
world without end. Amen.
But in the current English translation of the Liturgy of the Hours (which I presume is the bit where you are finding it in Magnificat), it is rendered:
Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

tee
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Old Jul 15, '10, 1:33 pm
smithm29 smithm29 is offline
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Default Re: The Glory Be to the Father prayer

The orthodox liturgy uses the following- it's really beautiful sung:

Glory to the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit,
now and forever and to the ages of ages. Amen.

I'd imagine that's closer to the Greek, and would have been used in the liturgy of the hours for that reason.
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Old Jul 15, '10, 2:34 pm
Apollos Apollos is offline
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Default Re: The Glory Be to the Father prayer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt CL View Post
I have recently noticed that sometimes the doxology prayer: Glory Be to Father will be printed as simply Glory to the Father , omitting the "Be". I am in my fifties, and I learned this prayer as "Glory Be to The Father", always containing the "Be".


I have noticed for instance that the Magnificat Magazine will omit the "Be" and just publish "Glory to the Father..."

I am curious as to why this prayer is different sometimes.
As tee_eff_em suggests, it's just a minor translation issue.

The original Latin has gloria Patri, and the word Patri literally means to-the-Father, because in Latin, many prepositions like to, for, with are already programmed into the endings of the words and so are usually left out of the sentence.

This is also the case with the verb to be, which is similarly left out most of the time because it's usually obvious from the context and doesn't need to be spelled out. For example, there is a Latin saying, De gustibus non disputandum, which means, Of tastes [there is] no disputing. The [there is] part, which in Latin would be just the word est, can be left out because it's obvious.

But English doesn't work that way, so we have to spell out all the prepositions and the verb to be in most cases. Hence a literal translation would be Glory to the Father, but a more natural translation would be Glory be to the Father.

Which one is "official"? I don't know. Stick with what you were taught.
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  #5  
Old Jul 15, '10, 2:46 pm
RobNY RobNY is offline
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Default Re: The Glory Be to the Father prayer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt CL View Post
I have recently noticed that sometimes the doxology prayer: Glory Be to Father will be printed as simply Glory to the Father , omitting the "Be". I am in my fifties, and I learned this prayer as "Glory Be to The Father", always containing the "Be".


I have noticed for instance that the Magnificat Magazine will omit the "Be" and just publish "Glory to the Father..."

I am curious as to why this prayer is different sometimes.
The Magnificat translation follows the official translation for the English language Liturgy of the Hours which reads, "Glory to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit...."

The more traditional translation, which you'll probably hear in your parish's rosary group is, "Glory be to the Father..."

Why the difference? Let's look at the Latin.

Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto, sicut erat...

Where is "be" in the original? We have "Glory," and then, "to the Father," but no "be." In Latin, since it is a subjunctive, we are missing "sit." It is common in Latin to drop the verb "to be" and leave it implicit.

The older and more common translation uses a more common English way of speaking when it makes "be" explicit. The identical meaning is contained in saying, "May Glory be to the Father..." because it is subjunctive.

Ironically, the new translation is more 'literal' to the structure of the Latin.

-Rob
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