Catholic FAQ


Latest Threads
newest posts



Go Back   Catholic Answers Forums > Forums > Apologetics > Social Justice
 

Welcome to Catholic Answers Forums, the largest Catholic Community on the Web.

Here you can join over 400,000 members from around the world discussing all things Catholic. Membership is open to all, Catholic and non-Catholic alike, who seek the Truth with Charity.

To gain full access, you must register for a FREE account. Registered members are able to:
  • Submit questions about the faith to experts from Catholic Answers
  • Participate in all forum discussions
  • Communicate privately with Catholics from around the world
  • Plus join a prayer group, read with the Book Club, and much more.
Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. So join our community today!

Have a question about registration or your account log-in? Just contact our Support Hotline.

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search Thread Display
  #46  
Old Feb 15, '12, 7:27 pm
lynnvinc lynnvinc is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: May 20, 2010
Posts: 2,699
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: How much of a sin is it to deny climate change?

Quote:
Originally Posted by littlebum2002 View Post
Sorry, I also want to post about climate change itself....
Thanks for this, Littlebum. My experience at CAF is that the ACC skeptics cannot under any means at all be convinced ACC is happening. It is a total waste of time to even try and convince them. They just will not accept it, even if God Himself were to come speak directly to them about it.....since they don't accept even what the scientists and popes have been saying about it. It's not a science issue, but an ideological issue, and they are totally convinced that if people seriously decide to mitigate ACC it will end up in a totalitarian regime and economic collapse. Recycling to them is the slippery road to such.

My question, therefore, was strictly about whether it is a sin to deny ACC (assuming it is real); and this was only for my own edification.

I, of course, feel very sorry for the tremendous human suffereing and loss of human life (and others of God's creatures) well on into the future from ACC -- perhaps even the untimely annihilation of all life on earth -- but at least I'm somewhat relieved the denialists' immortal souls are not as much in jeopardy as I had imagined.

I suppose at worst it might mean a longer stint in purgatory for the worst offenders (those who know ACC is happening, but work like dogs to pursuade others it is not happening)....but not spending their eternity in a much hotter place than a globally warmed world. That is a relief to me. Life is very precious, but our souls are even more precious.
__________________
"The Lord God lives before whom I stand."
-- 1 Kings 17:1

"Preach the Gospel at all times and if necessary use words."
-- St. Francis of Assisi

"I want to spend my Heaven doing good on Earth."
-- St. Therese of the Child Jesus
  #47  
Old Feb 15, '12, 7:30 pm
lynnvinc lynnvinc is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: May 20, 2010
Posts: 2,699
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: How much of a sin is it to deny climate change?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sedonaman View Post
IF angels exist, and IF they can enter the material world, and IF they could dance, how many could dance on the head of a pin?
Not sure, but I'd think an infinite number
__________________
"The Lord God lives before whom I stand."
-- 1 Kings 17:1

"Preach the Gospel at all times and if necessary use words."
-- St. Francis of Assisi

"I want to spend my Heaven doing good on Earth."
-- St. Therese of the Child Jesus
  #48  
Old Feb 15, '12, 8:00 pm
lynnvinc lynnvinc is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: May 20, 2010
Posts: 2,699
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: How much of a sin is it to deny climate change?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailor Kenshin View Post
IF the Church declares that Greenism is the new Word and ignoring it is a sin, THEN that is the day I leave.

This would constitute worship of the created, rather than the Creator. IF that's the case, why not just be a pagan?
How about the 10 Commandments, and "Thou shalt not kill" -- would that be cause for people to leave the Church (or leave staying in place, asleep in the pews)? That to me is a serious commandment, and if AGW is real, then we are indeed killing people well into the future (a portion of our CO2 emissions can stay in the atmosphere for up to 100,000 years).

I didn't need 95% scientific certainty, and neither did JPII when he first called on us to mitigate AGW.

I felt really bad back in 1990 when I came to understand AGW was likely, 5 years before it reached 95% confidence in scientific studies. I started reducing our household GHGs through energy/resource efficiency/conservation and was surprised to find we could reduce by about one-third cost-effectively, saving us $1000s over the decades since, without lowering our living standard (even increasing it a bit), even tho I'd been willing to sacrifice. (I'm not counting our living within 1 to 2 miles of work, since we had been doing that already since the 1970s when there was an energy crunch, and we became aware of peak oil and entropy).

Then in 2002 we moved to Texas for new jobs, and were able to get onto Green Mountain's 100% wind-generated electricity, and reduced our GHGs even further -- at first we paid about $5 more per month, but now we are paying about $5 less per month, as the rates for dirty electricity have surpassed our wind-energy rates. So financially that was a break-even deal.

And then 3 weeks ago, after our old clonker was going to cost much more to fix than it was worth, we bought a Chevy Volt and have been driving solely on our wind-generated electricity. Now a Volt is very expensive....we paid some $42,000 for it, but I have figured we'll be saving enough on driving the Volt that within 7 years it will make up the difference in what we would have paid for another car we were considering, and go on to save us more and more each year....assuming we live that long. If someone drives more than us (more than 5,000 miles a year), then they could make up the difference between a Volt and another car even faster.

We actually had money to buy the Volt bec we had always bought old cars for cash over the past 43 years of our marriage (10 cars for under $1000, 3 above that), and saved on our low driving, and on our many other environmental measures, and so this is the first car we bought on credit. We could have paid cash, but the car loan interest was much lower than on some of our other investment loans, so we're paying off those other loans first, then will pay off the Volt loan.

So I feel pretty good that we are on the right track to reducing our GHGs. My husband is now talking about installing solar panels on our house.

We feel very good to be on this right and righteous path of reducing our harms to people and others of God's creatures. We don't feel bad or sad or economically harmed or oppressed, but increasingly free and able to do God's will.

I just want to express, there is really no harm done in doing the EC (environmentally correct) thing....or at least harms are reduced. Please have no fear about communism or economic collapse (which may be more likely if we fail to mitigate environmental problems). Be not afraid. Do what is right and perfect, as our Father in Heaven does.
__________________
"The Lord God lives before whom I stand."
-- 1 Kings 17:1

"Preach the Gospel at all times and if necessary use words."
-- St. Francis of Assisi

"I want to spend my Heaven doing good on Earth."
-- St. Therese of the Child Jesus
  #49  
Old Feb 15, '12, 8:08 pm
FaithBuild18 FaithBuild18 is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: July 27, 2010
Posts: 500
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: How much of a sin is it to deny climate change?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartolome Casas View Post
Excellent question!

To me, if man-made climate change is real and is killing or will kill thousands or millions of people, it would be a huge sin if it meets the test for a Mortal Sin.

To be a Mortal Sin, the person would have to KNOW that this climate change is real, but pretends NOT to know this for some selfish reason.

Many of the people who are most vigorous in denying climate change have no scientific training and so cannot make an independent evaluation of the evidence.

They are simply following the leadership of their political movement.

So, they would not be sinning.
I have advanced scientific training and do actual scientific research in a laboratory for a living. That doesn't mean anything. I have no reason to even form an opinion on this matter. Neither do you. Very few people on this planet actually do scientific research ON THE CLIMATE. Anyone else who speaks on this is motivated purely by politics, and the people working ON THE CLIMATE are likely motivated largely by politics anyways.
  #50  
Old Feb 16, '12, 7:14 am
Sailor Kenshin's Avatar
Sailor Kenshin Sailor Kenshin is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: August 29, 2007
Posts: 9,727
Religion: Anti-marxist
Default Re: How much of a sin is it to deny climate change?

Quote:
Originally Posted by lynnvinc View Post
How about the 10 Commandments, and "Thou shalt not kill" --


<snip>



I just want to express, there is really no harm done in doing the EC (environmentally correct) thing....or at least harms are reduced. Please have no fear about communism or economic collapse (which may be more likely if we fail to mitigate environmental problems). Be not afraid. Do what is right and perfect, as our Father in Heaven does.
Of course there is harm.

The worship of the created rather than the Creator is harmful. The mandates of Caesar as he destroys EVEN OUR FREEDOM TO WORSHIP is harmful.

No one is stopping you or anyone from paying too much for a polluting 'green' vehicle, which you m stakenly believe is going to save the planet. It's your money (for a while) so spend it as you will.

What they are doing is stopping the rest of us from enjoying the benefits of a free market that was the basis for our Constitution.
__________________
Watch this space for further developments.
  #51  
Old Feb 16, '12, 10:10 am
Leon Bloy's Avatar
Leon Bloy Leon Bloy is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: December 16, 2011
Posts: 710
Religion: Roman Catholic
Default Re: How much of a sin is it to deny climate change?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gabriel Serafin View Post
The debate is not whether global warming is occurring, but rather what is causing the warming. Many scientists contend the change is merely a cyclical change. After all, much of the U.S. was once covered by glaciers which melted away with a global warming cycle millions of years ago.

The problem is that it has become a political issue, and for politicians, a crisis is a terrible thing to waste. The Marxist left has used the issue as an excuse to squelch Capitalism and industry, while the greatest polluting countries in the world such as Russia and China continue business as usual.

John Coleman, founder of the Weather Channel shared his views on Global Warming:

It is the greatest scam in history. I am amazed, appalled and highly offended by it. Global Warming; It is a SCAM. Some dastardly scientists with environmental and political motives manipulated long term scientific data to create an illusion of rapid global warming. Other scientists of the same environmental whacko type jumped into the circle to support and broaden the “research” to further enhance the totally slanted, bogus global warming claims. Their friends in government steered huge research grants their way to keep the movement going. Soon they claimed to be a consensus. Link source
Wow, what a great post... right on target, in my opinion.
  #52  
Old Feb 16, '12, 10:47 am
manualman manualman is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: December 17, 2004
Posts: 11,612
Religion: Catholic - no buts.
Default Re: How much of a sin is it to deny climate change?

Interesting topic. Let's take the emotionalism of the specific issue out and discuss the general principle at work. How serious a sin is it to KNOW an action is wrong, but to continue to commit it and fail to warn other believers about it.

Answer: Quite serious. Probably mortal.

But back to the specific issue at hand, it gets complex. Who is the mortal sinner, the AGW "denier" who still drives his SUV through the drive through or the AGW alarmist who opposes fossil fuel exploration and drives up energy costs to the point where millions of the world's poor cannot afford safe food refrigeration, transportation access to health care or access to resources that could make them economically self sufficient?

Each person must evaluate the situation and make decisions according to his own conscience on the matter. We each are obligated to take action against immorality. This particular issue simply isn't a clear one in terms of identifying which side is the good guys and which one is the bad guys.
  #53  
Old Feb 16, '12, 11:01 am
manualman manualman is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: December 17, 2004
Posts: 11,612
Religion: Catholic - no buts.
Default Re: How much of a sin is it to deny climate change?

Lynn, I am curious how you did the Volt math. From what I have learned, it has about a 30 mile per day maximum electric only range. So you can save only 1 gallon of gas per day compared to a decent econo-car (I get 38mpg average in my 2002 Saturn SL). After that 30 miles, you just get conventional econo-car mileage, right? But you still pay something for electricity. Let's say you are saving $3.00 per gallon of gas reduced compared to what you would have used in a 30mpg econocar. $3*365=$1,095 per year in savings.

You can buy nearly the same car in chevy Cruze Eco form for under $20,000 and get 42mpg highway. That's a lot more than 7 years in payback time period.

That's a lithium battery, isn't it? Isn't lithium a heavy metal? Know anything about the mining industry? At a minimum, a refined metal generates at least 2,000 pounds of toxic mining tailings for every 1 pound of refined product generated. If just 60# of the ~300# battery pack is a refined heavy metal, that's 120,000# of toxic mining tailings lying around out there somewhere (probably third world) just to power your car. Makes you think, eh?

A suggestion: buy some wrenches and books and learn to rescue unloved econocars. Both my Saturns would be in the junkyard by now if owned by mechanic-paying owners. But since I adopted them as my hobby, I have 38mpg transportation and didn't generate ANY toxic mining tailings to get it.

If your goal is to reduce your impact, the best route is almost always to use less rather than to buy more (whether it be solar panels, or LEDs or electric cars or whatnot). I think your goals are noble, even if I disagree with the level or urgency you assign it. Just beware of people marketing to you with smooth talk. If it sounds too good to be true, it is.
  #54  
Old Feb 16, '12, 2:29 pm
TheRealJuliane TheRealJuliane is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 11, 2010
Posts: 19,026
Religion: Roman Catholic
Default Re: How much of a sin is it to deny climate change?

Quote:
Originally Posted by manualman View Post
Interesting topic. Let's take the emotionalism of the specific issue out and discuss the general principle at work. How serious a sin is it to KNOW an action is wrong, but to continue to commit it and fail to warn other believers about it.

Answer: Quite serious. Probably mortal.

But back to the specific issue at hand, it gets complex. Who is the mortal sinner, the AGW "denier" who still drives his SUV through the drive through or the AGW alarmist who opposes fossil fuel exploration and drives up energy costs to the point where millions of the world's poor cannot afford safe food refrigeration, transportation access to health care or access to resources that could make them economically self sufficient?

Each person must evaluate the situation and make decisions according to his own conscience on the matter. We each are obligated to take action against immorality. This particular issue simply isn't a clear one in terms of identifying which side is the good guys and which one is the bad guys.
Don't forget the requirement to put CORN into our gas tanks, which not only reduces our gas mileage but messes up our combustion engines while increasing the price of food worldwide!

  #55  
Old Feb 16, '12, 3:37 pm
Arizona Mike Arizona Mike is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: May 28, 2011
Posts: 2,092
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: How much of a sin is it to deny climate change?

I think it appropriate to remember that after Fr. Maitre created what later became known as the "Big Bang Theory" of the universe's origin (which is generally accepted now, but at the time was fiercely challenged by those who held to a "Steady State" theory of cosmology), the Pope had an audience with Fr. Maitre, who was a brilliant physicist in addition to being a Jesuit priest.

As the Big Bang theory aligns closely with much of scripture, the Pope was very excited and suggested that the Church should explore the possibility of incorporating the theory into its teachings. Fr. Maitre suggested, I think wisely, that theories can be later found to be unsupported by new evidence, and the Church should not incorporate unproven and changeable scientific theories into its doctrinal (or moral) teachings.

That would certainly seem to apply to the AGW theory of Global Warming. When I grew up in the 1970s, the great danger that was predicted by climate scientists was just the opposite - that we were entering into a new Ice Age. Evidence can be found to be inconclusive in the light of new evidence, scientists differ (even a majority of scientists in a particular field can be found to be wrong), and individual Catholics can hold or not hold the same position as certain climatologists do without fear of sin.
  #56  
Old Feb 17, '12, 8:29 pm
lynnvinc lynnvinc is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: May 20, 2010
Posts: 2,699
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: How much of a sin is it to deny climate change?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailor Kenshin View Post
Of course there is harm.

The worship of the created rather than the Creator is harmful. ...
Did Noah misunderstood God, and was supposed to gather all the species and his own family, then send them to their destruction (rather than save them), because not to destroy them means he was a "created things" worshiper, rather than a God-worshiper.

Of course saints do tell us we should hate the world, but I think what they mean is that we should not be attached to material things; surely they do not mean we should destroy materials things to the effect that we harm and kill people by starving them out, poisoning them, or impoverishing them by destroying their property.

Becoming an environmentalist is a way of becoming an ascetic and denying ownself the inordinate and disordered pleasures that our society (esp the media) tell us to indulge in.

But I'm not even asking or expecting people to become self-denying environmentalists -- bec I know in our materialistic, hedonistic culture that call would go over like a lead balloon. People find it exceedingly hard to reduce their material possessions and pleasures even one iota. Even changing behavior, like bringing one's own shopping bags, is quite difficult for most people.

All I'm asking (and every other environmentalist I know is asking) is that people do environmental things that are economically sensible that would save them money without reducing their living standards (and strive to change their behavior at no cost to themselves), and by that way also reduce their environmental harms to people and God's creatures (on some of which we depend for our livelihood, such as food crops).

Since is it not a sin to kill people through environmental harms (as commentors here have made clear to me), then they don't have to worry about their own culpability or going to hell. I would just hope that they would strive to do what is more and even most pleasing to God, rather than just the minimum requirements for getting into heaven.

So if they harm and kill people thru environmental harms, I'll pray that people not harm others through environmental harms (but I don't have to be as concerned about their souls, as I had thought, since their souls are not endangered by the harms they commit). And I'll also pray for those people who are harmed (or whose loved ones are harmed) by environmental harms, that they do not become angry and hateful towards those that harm them and thereby fall into sin.

So I'm thinking the real danger of sin here is those who are harmed feeling anger and hatred for those who harm them.
__________________
"The Lord God lives before whom I stand."
-- 1 Kings 17:1

"Preach the Gospel at all times and if necessary use words."
-- St. Francis of Assisi

"I want to spend my Heaven doing good on Earth."
-- St. Therese of the Child Jesus
  #57  
Old Feb 18, '12, 7:48 am
lynnvinc lynnvinc is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: May 20, 2010
Posts: 2,699
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: How much of a sin is it to deny climate change?

Quote:
Originally Posted by manualman View Post
Lynn, I am curious how you did the Volt math. From what I have learned, it has about a 30 mile per day maximum electric only range. So you can save only 1 gallon of gas per day compared to a decent econo-car (I get 38mpg average in my 2002 Saturn SL). After that 30 miles, you just get conventional econo-car mileage, right? But you still pay something for electricity. Let's say you are saving $3.00 per gallon of gas reduced compared to what you would have used in a 30mpg econocar. $3*365=$1,095 per year in savings.

You can buy nearly the same car in chevy Cruze Eco form for under $20,000 and get 42mpg highway. That's a lot more than 7 years in payback time period.

That's a lithium battery, isn't it? Isn't lithium a heavy metal? Know anything about the mining industry? At a minimum, a refined metal generates at least 2,000 pounds of toxic mining tailings for every 1 pound of refined product generated. If just 60# of the ~300# battery pack is a refined heavy metal, that's 120,000# of toxic mining tailings lying around out there somewhere (probably third world) just to power your car. Makes you think, eh?

A suggestion: buy some wrenches and books and learn to rescue unloved econocars. Both my Saturns would be in the junkyard by now if owned by mechanic-paying owners. But since I adopted them as my hobby, I have 38mpg transportation and didn't generate ANY toxic mining tailings to get it.

If your goal is to reduce your impact, the best route is almost always to use less rather than to buy more (whether it be solar panels, or LEDs or electric cars or whatnot). I think your goals are noble, even if I disagree with the level or urgency you assign it. Just beware of people marketing to you with smooth talk. If it sounds too good to be true, it is.
Thanks for your comments. I figured the lithium might be bad, but didn't look into it much. I guess if my electricity were fossil-fuel-based, then it might not even make environmental sense to get a Volt or Leaf. Since it is wind-generated, I just did a guessimate that overall it would be the environmental thing to do in buying an EV.

Since we almost never go on the highway, then we can't get the highway mileage of, say, the Cruse (which is one of the cars we looked at); however, my husband wanted even more "luxury," since this will be our last car and we've had old beater cars all our 43 years of married life. He is really happy with the Volt & thinks it's a luxury car (we probably don't know the difference, since we've never had one; I told him it's just like a Jaguar, only better ).

Yes we will save about $1100 per year -- more if the cost of gas goes up. Our KWH charge is 12.7 cents, and the Volt's 40 miles uses 9.6 KWH...we're actually getting about 42 miles, since we are also hypermiling. And there is $7500 off our income tax next year. So that will make of the difference between the Volt and a car somewhat more luxurous than a Cruze within 7 years. We wanted to jump in now -- not only was our clonker going to cost more than it was worth to fix, but with gas prices set to increase and the EV rebate going to expire on the Volt after 200,000 are sold, we thought the time was right.

Some 15 years ago I was seriously thinking of converting an ICE car to an EV (in which case we would have used lead acid batteries & would not have gotten the regenerative breaking), but was too busy & just didn't have time to do it. The EV club told me it was easy, and they let me drive their EV conversion (a 77 Corolla) for a few minutes -- it had a 20 mile range. The savings of a pure EV are tremendous.....there's hardly any repairs at all.

RE auto pollution, there is a lot of pollution from driving an ICE gasoline car, and this causes miscarriages, birth defects, and a number of health problems for the born. One of the emissions is dioxin. Just a few days ago the EPA released a 27 year delayed study about the non-cancer ill health effects of dioxin (which the gov and chem industries were trying to hide) -- see http://www.epa.gov/dioxin

Now not everyone can afford a Volt, but they can find out ways to reduce their driving and their harm.....if they are really serious about reducing their harm to living beings. There's no law or sin against harming and killing people this way, but I for one feel compelled to reduce my harm and killing. You all have to make up your own minds about the situation.
__________________
"The Lord God lives before whom I stand."
-- 1 Kings 17:1

"Preach the Gospel at all times and if necessary use words."
-- St. Francis of Assisi

"I want to spend my Heaven doing good on Earth."
-- St. Therese of the Child Jesus
  #58  
Old Feb 18, '12, 8:41 am
JimG JimG is offline
Forum Elder
 
Join Date: May 23, 2004
Posts: 22,571
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: How much of a sin is it to deny climate change?

I suppose that the question is not so much whether climate change is real, but also whether it is a good thing, or a bad thing, or neutral in its effects.

Increased levels of CO2 in the atmosphere are generally beneficial to plant life, and of course plants are useful to people in many ways, particularly in producing the oxygen which people and animals need to survive.

It seems that atmospheric CO2 levels need to be at least above 150 ppm to avoid harming plant life, but below 5,000 ppm to avoid harming people.

I’m certainly no expert on the issue, but the hype seems way out of proportion to the expected change in CO2 levels.

Here is an article in First Things magazine which explores the issue in a little more depth.

http://www.firstthings.com/article/2...eenhouse-gases
  #59  
Old Feb 18, '12, 11:11 am
Sailor Kenshin's Avatar
Sailor Kenshin Sailor Kenshin is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: August 29, 2007
Posts: 9,727
Religion: Anti-marxist
Default Re: How much of a sin is it to deny climate change?

Again: nobody's stopping the greenies from doing or buying what they want; THEY are stopping US.
__________________
Watch this space for further developments.
  #60  
Old Feb 18, '12, 6:49 pm
lynnvinc lynnvinc is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: May 20, 2010
Posts: 2,699
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: How much of a sin is it to deny climate change?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimG View Post
I suppose that the question is not so much whether climate change is real, but also whether it is a good thing, or a bad thing, or neutral in its effects.

Increased levels of CO2 in the atmosphere are generally beneficial to plant life...
I actually did some 2ndary research on the impact of CO2 on food production for a paper I wrote (soon to be published) on Food Rights and Climate Change; here's that portion of it:
What might global warming and its effects mean for food and food production? First we need to address the argument that elevated carbon dioxide levels increase crop production. Aside from this being disingenuous because the CO2 is also causing warming and other effects that could be harmful to crops, there is evidence that increasing CO2 will not help crops as much as expected, and may even harm some crops and sea life, never mind the warming (Cline 2007: 23-26). While earlier enclosed studies showed increased growth with added CO2, recent open field studies show less increase and even a decline of some crops (Long, et al. 2006, Cruz, et al. 2007: 480). Furthermore, crops were found to be less nutritious (Högy, et al. 2009), and had greater pest damage (Hunter 2001). In the real world, crop growth is affected by many factors beyond CO2, including other nutrients, water supply, climate, extreme weather events, soil moisture, toxins expected to increase with global warming, and soil acidification from CO2 (Oh and Richter 2004). So while CO2 may moderately enhance crops up to a point, these other factors are expected to limit the potential enhancement and even lead to eventual declines. When the impact of warming is considered, a nonlinear relationship regarding crop productivity has been found for mid and high latitudes -- the U.S., Canada, Europe, Russia, Japan and Northern China -- with increased yields projected up to around 2050, after which the warming causes sharp decrease (Schlenker and Roberts 2009). A more recent study has found that climate change has already reduced some crops globally, despite CO2 fertilization and improved technology (Lobell, et al. 2011). As for sea life, an important human food supply, CO2-caused ocean acidification is having negative impacts on zooplankton (at the base of the food chain), shellfish, fish, and coral reefs, home to one-fourth of sealife (Rogers and Laffoley 2011; Doney, et al. 2009; Hoegh-Guldberg, et al. 2007; Munday, et al. 2010).

REFERENCES:
  • Cline, W. R. 2007. Global Warming and Agriculture. Washington, DC: Center for Global Development and the Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  • Cruz, R. V., H. Harasawa, M. Lal, S. Wu, Y. Anokhin, B. Punsalmaa, Y. Honda, M. Jafari, C. Li, and N. Huu Ninh. 2007. “Asia.” Climate Change 2007: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability. Contributions of Working Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. M. L. Parry, O. F. Canziani, J. P. Palutikof, P. J. van der Linden, and C. E. Hanson (eds.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, pp. 469-506.
  • Doney, S. C., V. J. Fabry, R. A. Feely, and J. Kleypas. 2009. Ocean Acidification: The Other CO2 Problem. Annual Review of Marine Sciences 1: 169-192.
  • Gornall, J., R. Betts, E. Burke, R. Clark, J. Camp, K. Willett, and A. Wiltshire. 2010. “Implications of Climate Change for Agricultural Productivity in the Early Twenty-First Century.” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A 365:2973-2989.
  • Hoegh-Guldberg, O., P. J. Mumby, A. J. Hooten, R. S. Steneck, and E. G. P. Greenfield, C. D. Harvell, P. F. Sale, A. J. Edwards, K. Caldeira, N. Knowlton, C. M. Eakin, R. Iglesias-Prieto, N. Muthiga, R. H. Bradbury, A. Dubi, M. E. Hatziolos. 2007. Coral reefs under rapid climate change and ocean acidification. Science 318(5857): 1737-1742.
  • Högy, P., H. Wieser, P. Köhler, K. Schwadorf , J. Breuer, J. Franzaring, R. Muntifering and A. Fangmeier. 2009. “Effects of elevated CO2 on grain yield and quality of wheat: results from a 3-year free-air CO2 enrichment experiment.” Plant Biology 11: 60-69.
  • Hunter, M. D. 2001. “Effects of Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide on Insect-Plant Interactions.” Agricultural and Forest Entomology 3: 153-159.
  • Lobell, D. B., W. Schlenker, and J. Costa-Roberts. 2011. “Climate Trends and Global Crop Production Since 1980.” Science 333(6042): 616-620.
  • Long, S. P., E. A. Ainsworth, A. D. B. Leakey, J. Nösberger, D. R. Ort. 2006. “Food for Thought: Lower-Than-Expected Crop Yield Stimulation with Rising CO2 Concentrations.” Science 312(5782): 1918-1921.
  • Munday, P. L., D. L. Dixson, M. I. McCormick, M. Meekan, M. C. O. Ferrari, and D. P. Chivers. 2010. “Replenishment of fish populations is threatened by ocean acidification.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 107(29):12930-12934.
  • Oh, N-H., and D. D. Richter, Jr. 2004. “Soil acidification induced by elevated atmospheric CO2” Global Change Biology 10.11: 1936-1946.
  • Oschlies, A., K. Schulz, U. Riebesell, and A. Schmittner. 2008. “Simulated 21st century’s increase in oceanic suboxia by CO2-enhanced biotic carbon export” Global Biochemical Cycles 22: 1-10.
  • Rogers, A. D., and D. d’A. Laffoley. 2011. International Earth System Expert Workshop on Ocean Stresses and Impacts. Summary Report. International Program on the State of the Ocean. Oxford. http://www.stateoftheocean.org/pdfs/1906_IPSO-LONG.pdf.
  • Schlenker, W., and M. Roberts. 2009. “Nonlinear Temperature Effects Indicate Severe Damages to U.S. Crop Yields under Climate Change.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. 106(37): 15594-15598.
__________________
"The Lord God lives before whom I stand."
-- 1 Kings 17:1

"Preach the Gospel at all times and if necessary use words."
-- St. Francis of Assisi

"I want to spend my Heaven doing good on Earth."
-- St. Therese of the Child Jesus
Closed Thread

Go Back   Catholic Answers Forums > Forums > Apologetics > Social Justice

Bookmarks

Tags
climate change, sin

Thread Tools Search Thread
Search Thread:

Advanced Search
Display

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Prayer Intentions

Most Active Groups
8333Meet and talk,talk talk
Last by: suko
5083CAF Prayer Warriors Support Group
Last by: tawny
4390Devotion to the Sorrowful Mother
Last by: FootStool
4036OCD/Scrupulosity Group
Last by: aellis422
3855SOLITUDE
Last by: beth40n2
3643Let's empty Purgatory
Last by: DesertSister62
3266Poems and Reflections
Last by: PathWalker
3230Petitions Before the Blessed Sacrament
Last by: grateful_child
3216Catholic Vegetarians & Vegans
Last by: TheWhim
3079For seniors and shut- ins
Last by: georget



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 5:55 pm.

Home RSS Feeds - Home - Archive - Top

Copyright © 2004-2014, Catholic Answers.