Catholic FAQ


Latest Threads
newest posts



Go Back   Catholic Answers Forums > Forums > Catholic Living > Spirituality
 

Welcome to Catholic Answers Forums, the largest Catholic Community on the Web.

Here you can join over 400,000 members from around the world discussing all things Catholic. Membership is open to all, Catholic and non-Catholic alike, who seek the Truth with Charity.

To gain full access, you must register for a FREE account. Registered members are able to:
  • Submit questions about the faith to experts from Catholic Answers
  • Participate in all forum discussions
  • Communicate privately with Catholics from around the world
  • Plus join a prayer group, read with the Book Club, and much more.
Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. So join our community today!

Have a question about registration or your account log-in? Just contact our Support Hotline.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search Thread Display
  #1  
Old Apr 16, '12, 4:28 pm
johnnyjones's Avatar
johnnyjones johnnyjones is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: April 11, 2011
Posts: 2,520
Religion: Yes
Default Deprograming from fundamentalism

Baptised Catholic, alter boy, went through the RC schools for 6 years, drank, remained nominally Catholic until about 27 years old, drank, many years of alcoholism, all the AA stuff, dove into multiple protestant denominations, drank, AA, stopped AA, no drinking for 16 years, stayed in Protestantism, came home to the Catholic church.

Some of my dilema is that many lingering concepts of fundamentalism remain. Some good, some distractive. Christian (Protestant) radio (AM) was a big part of my life and it fed my anti-Catholic outlook. To this day I still hear some on the radio calling the Catholic church the "whore of Baylon", Romanism etc. which I have actually called the station about.

Sometimes I doubt catholic teachings because old "red flags" come up telling me this is wrong, but another part of me says this must be true. I think praying to Mary or saints is something I feel is right at times (giving me a family feeling) and other times I think am I praying to a false entity (sometimes that is expressed in certain churches).

Any tips for developing and strengthening my Catholic beliefs ,and can I get to a point of certainty that the things I mentioned aren't wrong?
__________________
He stretched out the north over the empty space, and hangeth the earth upon nothing.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old Apr 16, '12, 5:04 pm
CatholicZ09's Avatar
CatholicZ09 CatholicZ09 is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: August 2, 2009
Posts: 2,781
Religion: Roman Catholic
Default Re: Deprograming from fundamentalism

Read some books from Scott Hahn. They really shed light on the teachings of Catholicism. You can find most of them on Amazon. Also, Eucharistic Adoration helps tremendously when you experience doubts and questions. Try going to Eucharistic Adoration often. Reading letters from the Early Church Fathers also helps. It'll take time for your doubts to go away, but when you keep fighting the good fight, you'll overcome the battle.
__________________
"Late have I loved you, O Beauty ever ancient, ever new, late have I loved you!" - St. Augustine
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old Apr 16, '12, 5:05 pm
trickster trickster is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: October 7, 2011
Posts: 1,263
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: Deprograming from fundamentalism

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnyjones View Post
Baptised Catholic, alter boy, went through the RC schools for 6 years, drank, remained nominally Catholic until about 27 years old, drank, many years of alcoholism, all the AA stuff, dove into multiple protestant denominations, drank, AA, stopped AA, no drinking for 16 years, stayed in Protestantism, came home to the Catholic church.

Some of my dilema is that many lingering concepts of fundamentalism remain. Some good, some distractive. Christian (Protestant) radio (AM) was a big part of my life and it fed my anti-Catholic outlook. To this day I still hear some on the radio calling the Catholic church the "whore of Baylon", Romanism etc. which I have actually called the station about.

Sometimes I doubt catholic teachings because old "red flags" come up telling me this is wrong, but another part of me says this must be true. I think praying to Mary or saints is something I feel is right at times (giving me a family feeling) and other times I think am I praying to a false entity (sometimes that is expressed in certain churches).

Any tips for developing and strengthening my Catholic beliefs ,and can I get to a point of certainty that the things I mentioned aren't wrong?
JohnnyJones! Wow! When one lives two traditions the kinds of back and forth feelings and thinking you talk about seems to be quite normal. I guess the only thing to do is to trust the journey that your Creator is taking you on, pray for understanding, pray for an openess and tolerance as well as a open and learning mind and heart, and study. I am Catholic but that does not mean I accept everything my church teaches me, I need to understand and to "own' it at the end of the day.

I look forward to the thoughts of other Catholics...on this...good posting!

Bruce
Trickster
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old Apr 16, '12, 5:06 pm
trickster trickster is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: October 7, 2011
Posts: 1,263
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: Deprograming from fundamentalism

Quote:
Originally Posted by CatholicZ09 View Post
Read some books from Scott Hahn. They really shed light on the teachings of Catholicism. You can find most of them on Amazon. Also, Eucharistic Adoration helps tremendously when you experience doubts and questions. Try going to Eucharistic Adoration often. Reading letters from the Early Church Fathers also helps. It'll take time for your doubts to go away, but when you keep fighting the good fight, you'll overcome the battle.
I agree, the Eucharist I think is the central focus of our faith, start from there and let the Creator take you where (S)he wants you to go...

Bruce
Trickster
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old Apr 16, '12, 5:07 pm
lampstand lampstand is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: March 6, 2008
Posts: 429
Religion: Greek Orthodox
Send a message via Yahoo to lampstand
Default Re: Deprograming from fundamentalism

Hoping you continue to grow in your faith, John.
__________________
St. Thomas, St. Simon of Cyrene and all the saints, pray for us
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old Apr 16, '12, 5:18 pm
hizown hizown is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: January 14, 2012
Posts: 82
Religion: Catholic 4bears
Default Re: Deprograming from fundamentalism

JohnnyJones, interesting rollercoaster ride... and just curious: do you have a thread somewhere (or a blogpost) about what tipped the scales to your coming back to Catholicism? And which non-Catholic denom did you belong to?
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old Apr 16, '12, 5:27 pm
po18guy's Avatar
po18guy po18guy is offline
Forum Elder
Prayer Warrior
Radio Club Member
 
Join Date: April 18, 2007
Posts: 23,756
Religion: One. Holy. Catholic. Apostolic.
Default Re: Deprograming from fundamentalism

Consider calling your local parish and asking when Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament is offered. Then, just go and spend time with our Lord in the Holy Eucharist. You might be amazed sooner, or you might be amazed later, but either way, you will be amazed. When you come to know that He is present, you will desire to go nowhere else.

A copy of Catholicism for Dummies, as elementary as it sounds, is an excellent resource. It is an easily read book that may be used as a catechism.

Mark Shea's books, such as This is My Body or By What Authority? will help you to know the process for conversion from fundamentalist to Catholic that Mr. Shea went through. His books are praised by none other than Catholic Answers' founder Karl Keating, Prof. Scott Hahn, Fr. Mitch Pacwa, and many others.

Watch EWTN if you have it. Listen to Catholic radio instead of the others. Attend a good Catholic bible study. It was there that my biggest objection to Catholic teaching simply vanished one night.
__________________
"He was the first one in the world to break all of the commandments at once"
- Bishop Fulton Sheen referencing Moses throwing the stone tablets -
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old Apr 16, '12, 5:29 pm
fred conty fred conty is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: December 15, 2010
Posts: 5,310
Religion: catholic
Default Re: Deprograming from fundamentalism

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnyjones View Post
Baptised Catholic, alter boy, went through the RC schools for 6 years, drank, remained nominally Catholic until about 27 years old, drank, many years of alcoholism, all the AA stuff, dove into multiple protestant denominations, drank, AA, stopped AA, no drinking for 16 years, stayed in Protestantism, came home to the Catholic church.

Some of my dilema is that many lingering concepts of fundamentalism remain. Some good, some distractive. Christian (Protestant) radio (AM) was a big part of my life and it fed my anti-Catholic outlook. To this day I still hear some on the radio calling the Catholic church the "whore of Baylon", Romanism etc. which I have actually called the station about.

Sometimes I doubt catholic teachings because old "red flags" come up telling me this is wrong, but another part of me says this must be true. I think praying to Mary or saints is something I feel is right at times (giving me a family feeling) and other times I think am I praying to a false entity (sometimes that is expressed in certain churches).

Any tips for developing and strengthening my Catholic beliefs ,and can I get to a point of certainty that the things I mentioned aren't wrong?
After 27 years you went into Protestantism. Having been catholic before, I would have thought you would go back to the catholic faith. Is that any particular reason why you didn't? Or was it that you didn't have any faith at all and were looking for it again?

Just a question.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old Apr 16, '12, 5:35 pm
Julia Mae's Avatar
Julia Mae Julia Mae is offline
Senior Member
Book Club Member
 
Join Date: July 30, 2011
Posts: 6,221
Default Re: Deprograming from fundamentalism

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnyjones View Post
I think praying to Mary or saints is something I feel is right at times (giving me a family feeling) and other times I think am I praying to a false entity (sometimes that is expressed in certain churches).
Trust that "family feeling." That is the Communion of Saints, the Church Triumphant, really, just your family. Mine, too. So many that rejoiced with such gladness at your return. Welcome home. Trust that Spirit that called you back. Pray to Saint Michael to defend you and imagine the angels he sends to surround you. The great thing about our Church is: it's all real.

Read a few Saint biographies, like Saint Francis and Padre Pio. Find some podcasts by Father Barron. I'm so glad you came home, my brother.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old Apr 16, '12, 6:20 pm
KathleenGee's Avatar
KathleenGee KathleenGee is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 15, 2009
Posts: 8,980
Religion: Roman Catholic
Default Re: Deprograming from fundamentalism

Johnnyjones....

Heresy truly pierces and withdraws the soul from the Truth of Jesus Christ and His Church.

The Blessed Mother is of great help...place yourself in her Immaculate Heart....and she will help through the Holy Spirit to heal the wounds....after all, a sword pierced her soul at the presentation of Our Lord in the temple.....How her Son would be the rise and fall of many of Israel.....but she remained faithful...the only perfect Christian....who was also given to us...to be our companion and protectress of faith.

The rosary is a most powerful means to heal the soul of falsehoods and false guilt.....
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old Apr 16, '12, 6:42 pm
agnes therese's Avatar
agnes therese agnes therese is offline
Regular Member
Book Club Member
 
Join Date: August 18, 2010
Posts: 4,284
Religion: Roman Catholic
Default Re: Deprograming from fundamentalism

God bless you, hon, you've certainly been there and back.

Apparently you're still listening to protestant radio stations -- I would suggest staying away from them, at least until you feel stronger and steadier in your faith. There's no need to expose yourself to things that you know will make you question the Church.

Welcome home!


Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnyjones View Post
Baptised Catholic, alter boy, went through the RC schools for 6 years, drank, remained nominally Catholic until about 27 years old, drank, many years of alcoholism, all the AA stuff, dove into multiple protestant denominations, drank, AA, stopped AA, no drinking for 16 years, stayed in Protestantism, came home to the Catholic church.

Some of my dilema is that many lingering concepts of fundamentalism remain. Some good, some distractive. Christian (Protestant) radio (AM) was a big part of my life and it fed my anti-Catholic outlook. To this day I still hear some on the radio calling the Catholic church the "whore of Baylon", Romanism etc. which I have actually called the station about.

Sometimes I doubt catholic teachings because old "red flags" come up telling me this is wrong, but another part of me says this must be true. I think praying to Mary or saints is something I feel is right at times (giving me a family feeling) and other times I think am I praying to a false entity (sometimes that is expressed in certain churches).

Any tips for developing and strengthening my Catholic beliefs ,and can I get to a point of certainty that the things I mentioned aren't wrong?
__________________
"When all is said and done, we are infinitely loved."
Pope Francis, Evangelii Gaudium
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old Apr 17, '12, 4:39 am
johnnyjones's Avatar
johnnyjones johnnyjones is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: April 11, 2011
Posts: 2,520
Religion: Yes
Default Re: Deprograming from fundamentalism

Quote:
Originally Posted by fred conty View Post
After 27 years you went into Protestantism. Having been catholic before, I would have thought you would go back to the catholic faith. Is that any particular reason why you didn't? Or was it that you didn't have any faith at all and were looking for it again?

Just a question.
I was Catholic in name and not in practice at age 27 or so. AA (Alcoholics Anonymous) was a tool to stop drinking and has some "spiritual" elements to it. Whether it was through some of the people I met , or the search for Godly "answers", I eventually gravitated towards a "bible only" outlook" maybe because AA provided a lot a reading materials like a "24 hour" book and the like that got me into" just words". As well I remember thinking that my Catholic upbringing was an "old style" approach to God.
I was also under the impression I couldn't develop fellowship in the Catholic church (which is very wrong thinking) possibly because some protestant churches had coffee hours and bible studies.
I got into the whole, anything outside the bible is "man made" outlook. Thank God for a rebirth. Thanks for the question, it made me think deeper about my life.
__________________
He stretched out the north over the empty space, and hangeth the earth upon nothing.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old Apr 17, '12, 5:34 am
fred conty fred conty is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: December 15, 2010
Posts: 5,310
Religion: catholic
Default Re: Deprograming from fundamentalism

I am happy to hear that our dear Lord sought you out and even more that you listened.
Sounds like you were really seeking Him but just didn't know where to find Him.
And He found you.

Jesus once told the story of two men who owed their master money. He forgave them both their debt, but one owed much more than the other. Then Jesus asked the question about who the master loved more; the one who owed less or the one who owed more. And the reply was the one who owed more. So that means you were very special to him.

Isn't He just great!
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old Apr 17, '12, 6:33 am
johnnyjones's Avatar
johnnyjones johnnyjones is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: April 11, 2011
Posts: 2,520
Religion: Yes
Default Re: Deprograming from fundamentalism

Quote:
Originally Posted by hizown View Post
JohnnyJones, interesting rollercoaster ride... and just curious: do you have a thread somewhere (or a blogpost) about what tipped the scales to your coming back to Catholicism? And which non-Catholic denom did you belong to?
Hi,

I don't have a blogpost and this is the first time I've asked this type
of question that to be honest, is very humbling. When I first joined this forum I did a meet and greet and mentioned some of my travels. I actually worked in a Catholic hospital as a Protestant years ago.

I have a friend who was going to the Catholic church, so that put some new thought in my head. You know, I can't really say what particular thing influenced me towards the church. When my friend was going, I just thought about it more. I was looking to go somewhere on
Sundays to be fulfilled. I went to a Lutheran church down the block which had an open question session during the service.
The minister brought up the Catholic church and how they were wrong on transubstantiation. I asked a question (can't remember what it was) and ended up "agreeing" with him on the point, somewhat reluctantly.

I went back to the church I was an alter boy at many years ago in another town and it was emotional. It was then I decided I must do with Catholicism what I did with Protestantism, that is, seek answers. I had many anti-Catholic questions. I found clear and sensible answers to some of them right here on this web site. Many of the the
things I was taught as a child (6 years RC schools) came back to me and were enlightening.
Sometimes it was like, Oh yeah, that's why. Good stuff. I think realizing that people lived without the bible and had traditions was a big influencing factor. That connected with Apostolic tradition.

Real people doing real Catholic actions invigorated me. I started to regularly go to mass. I went to confession and said to the priest, "Father forgive me it's been 25 years since my last confession!" Of course like anyone else I struggle with sin, but getting drunk is long behind me. Other human desires plague me.

As far as the denominations, they all had some strengthening qualities to them but something was missing. I didn't always feel that way, that developed a little later. I went to the Nazarene church and "joined", Prespatyrian services were a part of my journey, Assemblys of God, "non-denominational churches" or maybe they were Charasmatic , my daughter was baptized in the Episcopal church because of my incorrect views on Catholicism, I also took an interest in Baptist churches among maybe a few others for a short time.

Praise God I'm home. Thank you for the question, and thank you all for the kind words and support.
__________________
He stretched out the north over the empty space, and hangeth the earth upon nothing.

Last edited by johnnyjones; Apr 17, '12 at 6:51 am.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old Apr 17, '12, 6:35 am
CompSciGuy CompSciGuy is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: October 12, 2009
Posts: 1,613
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: Deprograming from fundamentalism

Read books about Mary, the saints, etc. I recommend Hail Holy Queen by Scott Hahn. The more you practice Marian devotion, the deeper your understanding will be of it, and the less "guilty" you will feel about doing it.

It should be easier for you to deprogram, as you were raised Catholic to begin with. I was raised fundamentalist so the sola scriptura thing was deeply embedded in my psychology. Deprogramming felt more like an uprooting for me; it is difficult for me to hold onto any faith now after my conversion. But I am managing to stay Catholic.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Go Back   Catholic Answers Forums > Forums > Catholic Living > Spirituality

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search Thread
Search Thread:

Advanced Search
Display

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



Prayer Intentions

Most Active Groups
8240Meet and talk,talk talk
Last by: GLam8833
4997CAF Prayer Warriors Support Group
Last by: James_OPL
4342Devotion to the Sorrowful Mother
Last by: James_OPL
4029OCD/Scrupulosity Group
Last by: B79
3830SOLITUDE
Last by: beth40n2
3550Let's empty Purgatory
Last by: RJB
3217Poems and Reflections
Last by: tonyg
3203Catholic Vegetarians & Vegans
Last by: memphian
3098Petitions Before the Blessed Sacrament
Last by: grateful_child
3043For seniors and shut- ins
Last by: Thomas Choe



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:21 am.

Home RSS Feeds - Home - Archive - Top

Copyright © 2004-2013, Catholic Answers.