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  #91  
Old May 5, '12, 4:35 pm
pbecke pbecke is offline
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Default Re: Your favourite accent

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Originally Posted by LoyalViews View Post
Well that would be Newfoundland...though it varies. Some places are mostly Irish sounding, others are like Irish-Welsh-Yorkshire-Highland Scot combined.


Cockney! Is that you?
You gad it!
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  #92  
Old May 5, '12, 4:42 pm
minkymurph minkymurph is offline
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Default Re: Your favourite accent

Love the French accent and love the French language.

At home, love a Dublin, Mayo and Donegal accents.

Cork is probably the most amusing 'cos I don't understand a word.
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  #93  
Old May 5, '12, 4:59 pm
pbecke pbecke is offline
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Default Re: Your favourite accent

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Originally Posted by KateKimmer View Post
I would love to have an English accent!
I've often sounded off about the English toffs' accent, but, in fact, I only referred to a certain, what we call, 'ya ya' drawl, delivered in an arrogant, imperious tone. The normal public school accent, as, for example, spoken by some English actors playing patrician characters, whether English of American, in American films, is beautifully clear and pleasant-sounding.

My wife has what's called a 'cut-glass', but completely unaffected accent. Whereas I seem to have mish-mash. From time to time people ask me if I'm Australian. I did live there for four years on and off in my younger days, but wasn't aware I'd kept some of the accent.

Highlanders are softly-spoken and pleasant to listen to, but certain Irish and for that matter, part-Irish, girls speak in a sublimely soft-spoken way, too. Rare, but I've encountered two: one in England and one in Scotland.

But for beautiful languages to hear, Italian and French seem to me the pinnacle. Spanish has a sonorous epic quality to it. Imagine a river called the Guadalqivir. I suppose the Spanish language is the acoustic equivalent of Flamenco dancing. It suits the music to a tee.
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  #94  
Old May 5, '12, 5:51 pm
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Aelred Minor Aelred Minor is offline
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Default Re: Your favourite accent

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Originally Posted by jannes View Post
Who says Americans don't have accents.?I.m a Scottish born Canadian and the Canadians also don't think they have accents .Some how like their Us cousins they think they are the centre of the universe and the rest of the world all speak strangely not them The pomposity slays me,I met a very well educated American couple on a cruise ship a few years ago who sympathetically patted my arm as they asked me was it really hard for me to learn to speak English when I arrived in Canada and did Canadians and Brits celebrate Christmas and Easter on the same day as them as they didn't speak American maybe they had other strange customs as well;I'm not kidding that really happenned . I thought the other passengers were going to throw them overboardThey also complained to the captain after we passed Hawii because the ship flew whichever flag \s territory we were passing through in this case the South Pacific Islands on our way to New Zealand they objected to the Union Jack because they thought America owned everythingJust to finish if you were living in Dublin or glasgow you would be the odd one with the Yankee accent


I don't know if this was a response to my question, but there's no need to hate. Those of us who can't detect our own accents due to whatever combination of factors, we can hardly help that fact. I've put serious effort into trying to perceive it, but to no avail except for consciousness of where I tend to slur certain sounds. And when you hear things from half a dozen people from different countries to the effect that they also can't hear American accents or that we have no accents, and also I once listened to a movie commentary by an Australian actor (or director, I forget now) who said "there's really no such thing as an American accent, only a flatting out of the English language", it becomes doubly confusing and you start to think there might be something uniquely bland and "unaccented" about your form of speech. So far Iím hearing all contradictions to that idea here though.

As for those Americans who were completely ignorant of geography and other cultures, just try to realize that not all Americans are like that. And if there are more such ignorant people in the United States than in many other countries, it's partially a result of our relative physical isolation, with everywhere being relatively far away other than Canada (which is so much like us) and Mexico (which has its unique place in the American psyche), and the Caribbean (generally we only visit resorts there, often American territories themselves). Compare that to the neighbors of any European country. Also the United States is so large and diverse that it's easier to start to see it as it's own little world than I suspect it would be for people in most other nations.

Also our education system is a mess, our news media is a joke, and of course the bulk of our entertainment media is domestic, and yet we learn it and so much of American culture is so popular overseas for some reason. Not an environment very conducive to an international worldview.

If I were from any other country I'd probably be a bit anti-American too, at least in terms of cultural influence on my own country. But there's no need to nurture anger at an entire incredibly diverse people.
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Last edited by Aelred Minor; May 5, '12 at 6:08 pm.
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  #95  
Old May 5, '12, 5:57 pm
LegoGE1947 LegoGE1947 is offline
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Default Re: Your favourite accent

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aelred Minor View Post


I don't know if this was a response to my question, but there's no need to hate. Those of us who can't detect our own accents due to whatever combination of factors, we can hardly help that fact. I've put serious effort into trying to perceive it, but to no avail except for consciousness of where I tend to slur certain sounds. And when you hear things from half a dozen people from different countries to the effect that they also can't hear American accents or that we have no accents, and also I once listened to a movie commentary by an Australian actor (or director, I forget now) who said "there's really no such thing as an American accent, only a flatting out of the English language" it becomes doubly confusing and you start to think there might be something uniquely bland and "unaccented" about your form of speech. So far Iím hearing all contradictions to that idea here though.

As for those Americans who were completely ignorant of geography and other cultures, just try to realize that not all Americans are like that. And if there are more such ignorant people in the United States than in many other countries, it's partially a result of our relative physical isolation, with everywhere being relatively far away other than Canada (which is so much like us) and Mexico (which has its unique place in the American psyche, and the Caribbean (generally we only visit resorts there, often American territories themselves). Compare that to the neighbors of any European country.

Also our education system is a mess, our news media is a joke, and of course the bulk of our entertainment media is domestic, and yet we learn it and so much of American culture is so popular overseas for some reason. Not an environment very conducive to an international worldview.

If I were from any other country I'd probably be a bit anti-American too, at least in terms of cultural influence on my own country. But there's no need to nurture anger at an entire incredibly diverse people.
It is similar to a person living in a certain house or apartment so long he/she is unaware of the smells in the home. But a visitor would notice it immediately.
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  #96  
Old May 5, '12, 6:03 pm
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Aelred Minor Aelred Minor is offline
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Default Re: Your favourite accent

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Originally Posted by LegoGE1947 View Post
It is similar to a person living in a certain house or apartment so long he/she is unaware of the smells in the home. But a visitor would notice it immediately.
In that case there's an actual biological explanation. We don't just get used to it, but actually stop smelling something if we are around it long enough. But we don't stop hearing a person's voice if they speak in our native accent.

I suspect there is something more complex and psychological at work, especially with so many people (here and in my real life) saying they hear their accent just as much as any other. Then again, the difference might be the frequency of exposure to different accents.
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  #97  
Old May 5, '12, 6:07 pm
LegoGE1947 LegoGE1947 is offline
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Default Re: Your favourite accent

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Originally Posted by Aelred Minor View Post
In that case there's an actual biological explanation. We don't just get used to it, but actually stop smelling something if we are around it long enough. But we don't stop hearing a person's voice if they speak in our native accent.

I suspect there is more complex and psychological at work, especially with so many people (here and in my real life) saying they hear their accent just as much as any other. Then again, the difference might be the frequency of exposure to different accents.
Interesting points! This emoticon reminds me of CBS News anchor Scott Pelley. A common line of his is "I just wonder..."

Last edited by LegoGE1947; May 5, '12 at 6:08 pm. Reason: add
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  #98  
Old May 7, '12, 11:16 am
pbecke pbecke is offline
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Default Re: Your favourite accent

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Originally Posted by Ridgerunner View Post
My wife is from Indiana and, to my ear, she has absolutely no accent at all. But I think that's because so many early radio personalities came from that general part of the U.S., and we think of that sound as "no accent".

Frederick the Great, I believe it was, said that he would speak to God in Spanish, to his mistress in Italian, and to his horse in German. Possibly there was merit in that statement.

I actually do like the ancient, disappearing "Upland South" accent, or "hillbilly" accent. It's closer, I read in college, to Elizabethan English than is modern English spoken in England. That's why John Donne, for example, rhymed "join" with "divine". Imagine Shakespeare performed in "hillbilly"! It's a thing all its own and excruciatingly hard to imitate correctly.

My own accent is mostly what is sometimes called the "Arkahoma" accent. It's sort of a blend of southern and southwestern. All truckers and most country/western singers speak an exaggerated form of Arkahoma, whether they're from the area or not. They must teach them that somewhere. I'll say, though, that it has variations that don't differ hugely, but differ some. I'm not saying it's the most pleasing of accents, but I'm comfortable with it.

You can speak Arkahoma in Southwest Mo, NW Ark, Eastern Ok, East Tx and parts of northern Louisiana, and you're still more or less "at home", linguistically. The only thing truly different is that "gulping" sound they seem to have in parts of Ark and Northern La. No Missourian, Texan or Oklahoman would ever do that "gulping".

It differs somewhat from men to women; the latter sounding more southern. I think they practice that in order to be kittenish and seductive. It does sound gentler and more feminine their way. Again, there's probably a school somewhere for that, only known to girls and women. Pure, unadulterated Arkahoma is pretty much a "guy thing", though some rodeo women ("goat ropers" they're called) speak it in its purest form between curses.

I had to laugh reading Fran Leibowitz when she said (tongue in cheek, of course) that if the U.S. got rid of most of the women and all the homosexuals, Arkahoma would eventually be "standard American English."
Actually, the British royal family, indeed, and the upper and upper middle class, (the latter, according to the older classifications, i.e. the highest echelon of the landed gentry) still pronounce 'pound', for example as 'pined'. It is literally that easy. The Northern Irish do too. I wouldn't be surprised if some Canadians do too. Apparently, though more standardised, Quebecois French has similarities to 17th and 18th century French.
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  #99  
Old May 7, '12, 11:26 am
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Default Re: Your favourite accent

I enjoy other accents. English, Ny, Indian etc.. most really.
That said I was really surprised when I visited NY and someone told me they loved my southern accent to which I replied I love your accent too.
They were offended and said they did not HAVE an accent.
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  #100  
Old May 7, '12, 3:40 pm
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CHRISTINE77 CHRISTINE77 is offline
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Default Re: Your favourite accent

Fwensh!

No, actually I prefer a good English accent. But all accents are fun to hear.

By the way, how many of you say AH-men, and how many say AYE- men?

I say AYE-men.
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  #101  
Old May 7, '12, 6:11 pm
christian7777 christian7777 is offline
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Default Re: Your favourite accent

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Originally Posted by CHRISTINE77 View Post
Fwensh!

No, actually I prefer a good English accent. But all accents are fun to hear.

By the way, how many of you say AH-men, and how many say AYE- men?

I say AYE-men.
I say "AH-men".
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  #102  
Old May 7, '12, 6:21 pm
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Default Re: Your favourite accent

I grew up immediately outside of Baltimore and prefer that accent. The closer you are to the Bay, the more prevalent it seems to be. You hear it the most in the pronunciation of "o". Once you get out into the suburbs, where the transplants are, it more or less disappears in favor of a generic American accent you tend to hear on TV. If you get out even further, a kind of mild Southern Drawl starts to take hold.

I'm also a big fan of Standard German spoken with a Middle-Bavarian accent, but you pretty much have to go to Germany for that one.

I prefer "ah-men" but have been learning to say "ay-men" to blend in with my new parish.
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  #103  
Old May 7, '12, 6:27 pm
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Default Re: Your favourite accent

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Originally Posted by SwizzleStick View Post

Does anyone like to hear German? It is rather guttural, ja?
Ja, Deutsch ist super!

(Please note: uber has NEVER meant super in German. It means over, or about.)

Anyway, I am a great fan of Congo, mid Africa accent, as I went to a Mass at my local Cathedral, where a wonderful priest presided with an awesome African, almost Jamaican accent.

My brother has a hilarious British friend. My bro asked him to speak "with an American Accent". LOL. It was ridiculous.
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  #104  
Old May 7, '12, 6:28 pm
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Default Re: Your favourite accent

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Originally Posted by christian7777 View Post
I say "AH-men".

The Russians and Armenians say Ah-MEEN. Kinda cool.
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  #105  
Old May 7, '12, 6:35 pm
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Default Re: Your favourite accent

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Originally Posted by chadair View Post
how come y'all don't have an accent when ya sang? The Beattles didn't or any other British band
The acts of speaking and singing utilize different parts of the brain. That's one reason trained singers tend not to have as noticeable an accent.
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