Catholic FAQ


Latest Threads
newest posts



Go Back   Catholic Answers Forums > Forums > Catholic Living > Evangelization
 

Welcome to Catholic Answers Forums, the largest Catholic Community on the Web.

Here you can join over 400,000 members from around the world discussing all things Catholic. Membership is open to all, Catholic and non-Catholic alike, who seek the Truth with Charity.

To gain full access, you must register for a FREE account. Registered members are able to:
  • Submit questions about the faith to experts from Catholic Answers
  • Participate in all forum discussions
  • Communicate privately with Catholics from around the world
  • Plus join a prayer group, read with the Book Club, and much more.
Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. So join our community today!

Have a question about registration or your account log-in? Just contact our Support Hotline.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search Thread Display
  #76  
Old May 12, '12, 7:24 am
BListon's Avatar
BListon BListon is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: February 17, 2012
Posts: 728
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: To protestant converts:

Well... my middle school history teacher was giving a lesson on the Protestant reformation, and how it took place in the 1500s, I asked her what everyone was before then, she said Catholic, ergo, I became Catholic.
Reply With Quote
  #77  
Old May 13, '12, 7:29 am
Koineman's Avatar
Koineman Koineman is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 4, 2012
Posts: 466
Religion: Lutheran (LCMS)
Default Re: To protestant converts:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Della View Post
Again, it's authority, authority again and again authority.
Yes, I agree. Everyone has some kind of ultimate authority that they heed. But again, apostolic authority is validated by fidelity to what the apostles originally taught. This is not simply a matter of saying, "The Catholic Church has authority." If the CC claims to have descended in direct succession from Peter, the first pope, and to have handed on the Traditions of the apostles faithfully from one pope to the next, then the teachings of the CC today should mirror those of the apostles. We should be able to see the CC's teachings in the apostolic teaching, whether explicitly or implicitly. If we cannot, then the authority is suspect. It is not just a succession of men, but also a succession of doctrine.
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old May 13, '12, 9:02 am
Della Della is offline
Forum Master
 
Join Date: May 18, 2004
Posts: 14,296
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: To protestant converts:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Koineman View Post
Yes, I agree. Everyone has some kind of ultimate authority that they heed. But again, apostolic authority is validated by fidelity to what the apostles originally taught. This is not simply a matter of saying, "The Catholic Church has authority." If the CC claims to have descended in direct succession from Peter, the first pope, and to have handed on the Traditions of the apostles faithfully from one pope to the next, then the teachings of the CC today should mirror those of the apostles. We should be able to see the CC's teachings in the apostolic teaching, whether explicitly or implicitly. If we cannot, then the authority is suspect. It is not just a succession of men, but also a succession of doctrine.
You need to read the Early Church Fathers, but I can tell you from the experience of others who did so that the ECFs reflected current teaching in all respects.

Also, it helps if you know why the Church teaches what it does, and how it decides matters of faith (doctrine and dogma) and the origins of that. I would only say that researching those questions will be a lot of work. I recommend reading articles on Catholic Answers as well as others who have explored the ECFs.

It is not easy to turn one's mind inside out and see things from a completely different set of criteria. I know how hard it is since I've "been there, done that, got the t-shirt." Pray for faith, and trust in God and it will all fall into place in God's good time. For at some point we simply have to say, "I believe" and let our hearts be at peace. Jesus would never have let the Church do off the rails. He promised the Apostles and their successors that they would be led into "all truth". The Catholic Church is that Church. That's an historical fact. Everything it teaches is right and proper. We may not always understand everything (most of us are not theologians) but we can trust Jesus' promise and the Holy Spirit. That's all God expects of us.
__________________
The external deserts in the world are growing, because the internal deserts have become so vast. -- Pope Benedict XVI

Tiber Swim Team, Class of '87.

Inklings!

"Sanctum erit, facere bonum" Della's blog: http://dellakmg.blogspot.com/
Reply With Quote
  #79  
Old May 13, '12, 2:34 pm
Koineman's Avatar
Koineman Koineman is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 4, 2012
Posts: 466
Religion: Lutheran (LCMS)
Default Re: To protestant converts:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Della View Post
You need to read the Early Church Fathers, but I can tell you from the experience of others who did so that the ECFs reflected current teaching in all respects.

Also, it helps if you know why the Church teaches what it does, and how it decides matters of faith (doctrine and dogma) and the origins of that. I would only say that researching those questions will be a lot of work. I recommend reading articles on Catholic Answers as well as others who have explored the ECFs.

It is not easy to turn one's mind inside out and see things from a completely different set of criteria. I know how hard it is since I've "been there, done that, got the t-shirt." Pray for faith, and trust in God and it will all fall into place in God's good time. For at some point we simply have to say, "I believe" and let our hearts be at peace. Jesus would never have let the Church do off the rails. He promised the Apostles and their successors that they would be led into "all truth". The Catholic Church is that Church. That's an historical fact. Everything it teaches is right and proper. We may not always understand everything (most of us are not theologians) but we can trust Jesus' promise and the Holy Spirit. That's all God expects of us.
Thanks for your gracious attitude, Della. You're right: It's not easy to turn the mind inside out and see things from different criteria. In all honesty, as I was telling someone recently, at this point I actually want my research to turn out in favor of the Catholic Church. When I read a defense of a particular Catholic teaching that seems to ring true, I feel thrilled inside. So I am actually biased toward the CC instead of against it.
Reply With Quote
  #80  
Old May 13, '12, 3:08 pm
Della Della is offline
Forum Master
 
Join Date: May 18, 2004
Posts: 14,296
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: To protestant converts:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Koineman View Post
Thanks for your gracious attitude, Della. You're right: It's not easy to turn the mind inside out and see things from different criteria. In all honesty, as I was telling someone recently, at this point I actually want my research to turn out in favor of the Catholic Church. When I read a defense of a particular Catholic teaching that seems to ring true, I feel thrilled inside. So I am actually biased toward the CC instead of against it.
G. K. Chesterton (whose writing I highly recommend: Orthodoxy, The Everlasting Man, The Catholic Faith and Conversion) famously wrote that when a man stops resisting the Church he begins to be attracted to it.

You'll find that every teaching of the Church exalts Christ and shows us God's love and mercy. It's mission is to bring Christ to men--in all his fullness, beauty and truth.
__________________
The external deserts in the world are growing, because the internal deserts have become so vast. -- Pope Benedict XVI

Tiber Swim Team, Class of '87.

Inklings!

"Sanctum erit, facere bonum" Della's blog: http://dellakmg.blogspot.com/
Reply With Quote
  #81  
Old May 15, '12, 6:47 am
KansasGirl's Avatar
KansasGirl KansasGirl is offline
New Member
Prayer Warrior
 
Join Date: July 8, 2008
Posts: 32
Lightbulb Re: To protestant converts:

The Holy Spirit brought me to the Church. Even as a child (I was not raised in any church or denomination), if I needed to pray, I would go to the Catholic Church in my hometown, go inside, kneel down, and pray. I always felt compelled to go there. The door were always open too, whereas, the protestant churches in town always had locked doors.

Throughout my life, I've always had little things or "coincidences" happen that pointed to the Church. One of the very last things that "sealed the deal" for me was this: I was trying to decide whether or not to join the Church (I like how I was trying to decide. God had all ready decided I should join. ). As we drove down the highway, I had my eyes closed and I was praying with all my heart for God to show me which path I should take. When I opened my eyes, a huge semi passed on my side of the truck. The words on the side of the truck said, "POPE."

God has a sense of humor.
Reply With Quote
  #82  
Old May 15, '12, 7:30 am
Layman F's Avatar
Layman F Layman F is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: November 22, 2011
Posts: 92
Religion: Discerning...
Default Re: To protestant converts:

Quote:
Originally Posted by KansasGirl View Post
The Holy Spirit brought me to the Church. Even as a child (I was not raised in any church or denomination), if I needed to pray, I would go to the Catholic Church in my hometown, go inside, kneel down, and pray. I always felt compelled to go there. The door were always open too, whereas, the protestant churches in town always had locked doors.

Throughout my life, I've always had little things or "coincidences" happen that pointed to the Church. One of the very last things that "sealed the deal" for me was this: I was trying to decide whether or not to join the Church (I like how I was trying to decide. God had all ready decided I should join. ). As we drove down the highway, I had my eyes closed and I was praying with all my heart for God to show me which path I should take. When I opened my eyes, a huge semi passed on my side of the truck. The words on the side of the truck said, "POPE."

God has a sense of humor.
I'm still in awe of how often these kind of "coincidences"are a part of people coming to belief.
__________________
Layman is my name. This should be proof that God has a sense of humor!
Reply With Quote
  #83  
Old May 15, '12, 10:33 am
CatherineOH's Avatar
CatherineOH CatherineOH is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: January 9, 2012
Posts: 309
Religion: now Catholic 2012
Default Re: To protestant converts:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Layman F View Post
I'm still in awe of how often these kind of "coincidences"are a part of people coming to belief.
He shows us the way. It is us who must Listen.

Being raised Lutheran, then United Methodist, I removed my letter of membership with the UMC years ago when they became pro-choice, and pro-gay/lesbian. I believe in hating the sin but loving this sinner, but they were proving to be lovers of the sin. I returned to the Lutheran church after much seeking.

As a Lutheran, I already crossed myself, prayed the rosary, believed in the presence in the Eucharistic, had communion at EVERY mass ....etc etc

Then I cam across an important book in my life by a theosophist. Anne Bessant 'Esoteric Christianity' which lead me to reading the Tao and others. Then an important person became known to me by the name of Thomas Merton I have a small collection of his works. Unknown to me before entering RICA, he was a Catholic Monk. My favorite quote of his is; “The beginning of love is to let those we love be perfectly themselves, and not to twist them to fit our own image. Otherwise we love only the reflection of ourselves we find in them.” This line was the fire lighting the crucible at Christmas. (My favorite book is the 7 storied mountain)

For all the reasons mentioned by others before me, including Pope Paul's letter on women and many other things, I am now Catholic. Yes, it has taken quite some time. I"m not a joiner. It has only taken about 25 years, but I did join an RICA class last fall. I just wanted to learn more, and something was pushing me that direction. It was the same something that has urged me to do many things in my life. Some would call it my guardian angel, others the holy spirit, still others my patron saint. Perhaps it was all of the above. It took a lot of shoving.

The last I took communion in the Lutheran church at Christmas.It seemed empty. That is when Merton's line came to mind and I started thinking of it in terms of the original separation of Martin Luther from the church. I heartily believe that if Luther were alive today, he would still be part of the church. It took the church about 100 years to correct itself, but it indeed did. Martin Luther, Wycliff, Tyndale, Calvin and the rest were taking the WORD and twisting it to fit their own image. More have followed in their example bringing most of the Protestant denominations further away from the WORD. The next night I knew the next time, I would be taking communion (the Eucharistic) as a person in communion with the Catholic church., for the Church is the original one and is the one Jesus started. .... and so here I am.
__________________
~Katie~
Agnus Dei, qui toll is peccata mundi: miserere nobis.
We should always remember that Christ's Church is not a sanctuary for Saints, but it is a hospital for
sinners.

Last edited by CatherineOH; May 15, '12 at 10:49 am.
Reply With Quote
  #84  
Old May 15, '12, 11:17 am
Della Della is offline
Forum Master
 
Join Date: May 18, 2004
Posts: 14,296
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: To protestant converts:

I can relate CatherineOH to what you wrote about the reformers because as a former Episcopalian I too thought about our founder and realized the only thing that had caused Henry VIII's break with Rome was that Rome wouldn't give him what he wanted--an annulment. Henry died believing himself still a good Catholic, strangely enough. But those who followed him took things way beyond what he intended because men's desires, not God, was at the back of it.

I was happy as an Episcopalian. The liturgy was lovely, the hymns beautiful and rich in meaning, I had read nearly everything written by C. S. Lewis who, if Episcopalians claimed patron saints would have been mine. I even got the sense that I was receiving something in communion, for I had an open heart that God would not deny. I think it's why so many don't "cross the Tiber"--because God doesn't desert them and they are satisfied where they are.

But, when I joined another parish in a church built by a contractor who builds gymnasiums, a lot of the charm disappeared. Stripped of all the Gothic trappings it just wasn't the same--something was missing. I little understood it was the Eucharist, but I was restless enough to check out the Catholic parish near our house. It was modern and a lot like the Episcopal church (although the building was a step up, but nearly as ugly IMHO). Still, there was "something" there that was missing from the other and it wasn't just architecture.

I was reconciled to the Church in that ugly Catholic parish, but we now go to a more orthodox parish whose church design is slightly better but still not to my tastes. There the liturgy is celebrated with reverence, the word is preached in truth, and we worship God offering the one sacifice of Christ upon the altar. I've come home, and discovered no matter how plain a building might be or how cold the people or lame the celebration, that Christ is still there in the Eucharist, and that I could never leave having received the body and blood, soul and divinity of Christ himself.
__________________
The external deserts in the world are growing, because the internal deserts have become so vast. -- Pope Benedict XVI

Tiber Swim Team, Class of '87.

Inklings!

"Sanctum erit, facere bonum" Della's blog: http://dellakmg.blogspot.com/
Reply With Quote
  #85  
Old May 15, '12, 11:53 am
CatherineOH's Avatar
CatherineOH CatherineOH is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: January 9, 2012
Posts: 309
Religion: now Catholic 2012
Default Re: To protestant converts:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Della View Post
I can relate CatherineOH to what you wrote about the reformers because as a former Episcopalian I too thought about our founder and realized the only thing that had caused Henry VIII's break with Rome was that Rome wouldn't give him what he wanted--an annulment. Henry died believing himself still a good Catholic, strangely enough. But those who followed him took things way beyond what he intended because men's desires, not God, was at the back of it.....
I'm discovering through my studies too of certain inconsistencies with Martin Luther. I'm thinking he began having some serious mental issues at about the same time he was excommunicated. It is most evident through the dissertations on how he was editing the bible. I think the second edition of the KJV is lucky to still have most of the books intact. I'm glad Tyndale (and others) disagreed with Luther on those matters..

Quote:
Originally Posted by Della View Post
...Christ is still there in the Eucharist, and that I could never leave having received the body and blood, soul and divinity of Christ himself.
AMEN. Welcome Home
__________________
~Katie~
Agnus Dei, qui toll is peccata mundi: miserere nobis.
We should always remember that Christ's Church is not a sanctuary for Saints, but it is a hospital for
sinners.
Reply With Quote
  #86  
Old May 17, '12, 6:49 pm
in_servitude in_servitude is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: December 22, 2011
Posts: 776
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: To protestant converts:

This is embarrassing to admit, but it was the conversion of my anti-catholic brother-in-law (who's family was living with us at the time). He joined the church, then I joined a year later.

His parents were protestant, as are mine. I figured that was what I was supposed to do, stay out of the Church.

Ooofff, what a terrible idea. But, that's the truth. I watched him stand up and become Catholic against his parent's wishes.

Then, I grew up. I did the same thing the next year.
__________________
in servitude to our Master
Reply With Quote
  #87  
Old May 21, '12, 7:59 am
gigi4747 gigi4747 is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: April 9, 2012
Posts: 43
Smile Re: To protestant converts:

Quote:
Originally Posted by faithtrekker View Post
I've been a Christian for 30 years within the Evangelical spectrum. What brought me to Catholicism: I finally read the Bible for myself & felt like I couldn't reconcile things like Calvin's TULIP or Once Saved Always Saved. After sifting through tons of denominations, the closest expression I could see that mirrored what the Bible actually taught was Catholicism. That brought me to the writings of the early church fathers. When I compared the history & longevity of the Catholic church to the ill-effects of the Protestant Reformation & my own experience, I knew there was no other logical choice. It scared me, really, to be faced with Catholicism. It was the last place I ever thought I'd end up! I didn't just jump on the bandwagon... I tried to gloss over it... took my time... but almost a decade later, I know this is where God has been leading me all along. I'll be confirmed this Easter Vigil!
I like "newly minted." Welcome home!
Reply With Quote
  #88  
Old May 22, '12, 8:50 pm
DHC1Chipmunk's Avatar
DHC1Chipmunk DHC1Chipmunk is offline
Prayer Warrior
 
Join Date: April 16, 2008
Posts: 110
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: To protestant converts:

Reasons I converted to Catholicism:

The fragmentation of the Protestant "church" (the fact that I could choose a new "church" when I wanted a new theology).
The complete disregard within the Protestant denominations to which I belonged of the saints and the Church triumphant.
Hearing Protestant pastors make rabidly anti-Catholic remarks during sermons ("methinks thou dost protest too much").

I'm grateful to God for using these things to lead me home to the Catholic Church.

As an aside, I've yet to hear any Catholic make rabidly anti-Protestant remarks.
Reply With Quote
  #89  
Old May 23, '12, 7:21 am
CatherineOH's Avatar
CatherineOH CatherineOH is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: January 9, 2012
Posts: 309
Religion: now Catholic 2012
Default Re: To protestant converts:

Quote:
Originally Posted by DHC1Chipmunk View Post
.............As an aside, I've yet to hear any Catholic make rabidly anti-Protestant remarks.
From Catholics, I have heard a few, but Very Very Few. And the comments / remarks were spot on ... sort of along the lines that I said a few posts up about M. Luther. I heartily think he would still be in the Church. As for H 8th, I think he was as self centered as we all tend to be. The problem is that he was the head of a country and had the wealth and power to do something more about it.

Lord have Mercy on us all for we are all struggling daily / hourly to live our lives as Apostles of Christ.
I think this website has said it well; http://www.crawfordcountycatholics.c...catholics.html
Quote:
We should always remember that Christ's Church is not a sanctuary for Saints, but it is a hospital for
sinners. Christ did not die on a cross for our sins so that only the Saints can be saved. It is also very
clear from the Bible that even the first 12 apostles who Jesus chose were sinners. Jesus did not
reject these men even though he knew they were sinners. After all Peter denied Christ three times,
Judas betrayed him, and Thomas doubted the resurrection, but they were still chosen to be apostles.
So, while it is clear that all Christians should strive to be united with Christ we should never be
scandalized when other Christians fall into sin. Instead, we should always strive to keep sin out of our
lives and we should always pray that sinners will be reconciled to Christ and will become the best
Christian that they can.
As Moher Angelica said while talking about mercy "We are all sinners in one way or the other"
__________________
~Katie~
Agnus Dei, qui toll is peccata mundi: miserere nobis.
We should always remember that Christ's Church is not a sanctuary for Saints, but it is a hospital for
sinners.
Reply With Quote
  #90  
Old May 23, '12, 8:43 pm
aragonjohn1's Avatar
aragonjohn1 aragonjohn1 is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: October 2, 2009
Posts: 1,451
Religion: Catholic
Cool Re: To protestant converts:

I was an atheist I realized Jesus loved me and I broke down crying.

God called me and nothing can seperated me from Him.

Shalom
__________________
GOD IS LOVE A human Is a body and a soul
If you want to know who I am,” he said, “Christian is my name,
Catholic is my surname.
- St. Pacian
"You are now aware that you are breathing"
- MarcusAndreas
(\_/)
(O.o)
(> <) "This is Bunny. Copy Bunny" - Bunny
Reply With Quote
Reply

Go Back   Catholic Answers Forums > Forums > Catholic Living > Evangelization

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search Thread
Search Thread:

Advanced Search
Display

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Prayer Intentions

Most Active Groups
8257Meet and talk,talk talk
Last by: GLam8833
5022CAF Prayer Warriors Support Group
Last by: Vim71
4346Devotion to the Sorrowful Mother
Last by: FootStool
4029OCD/Scrupulosity Group
Last by: B79
3835SOLITUDE
Last by: beth40n2
3571Let's empty Purgatory
Last by: RJB
3230Poems and Reflections
Last by: tonyg
3207Catholic Vegetarians & Vegans
Last by: Chast Forever
3139Petitions Before the Blessed Sacrament
Last by: Amiciel
3049For seniors and shut- ins
Last by: Thomas Choe



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 2:49 am.

Home RSS Feeds - Home - Archive - Top

Copyright © 2004-2014, Catholic Answers.