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  #1  
Old Jul 1, '12, 4:02 am
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MissRose73 MissRose73 is offline
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Default Leaving your seat during Mass and returning to it

I understand there may be times when you must leave your seat during Mass to use the bathroom (especially if the need comes during Mass without much warning & you cannot wait), change a baby's diaper in the ladies' room, or calm down a child as examples.

In your opinion, when those needs listed above or related are handled, when do you return to your seat? Does it matter where you were seated prior to your need to get up? (as I think if you sit closer to the front compared to the back or middle of the church.)

To me, I was raised to not come back until there was a time the people were standing especially if you had to get up while people were still seated if possible. Also, to not leave during the Consecration unless it was very urgent to do so to handle such things listed in my first paragraph.
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Old Jul 1, '12, 4:18 am
HisIsTheCrown HisIsTheCrown is offline
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Default Re: Leaving your seat during Mass and returning to it

Quote:
Originally Posted by MissRose73 View Post
I understand there may be times when you must leave your seat during Mass to use the bathroom (especially if the need comes during Mass without much warning & you cannot wait), change a baby's diaper in the ladies' room, or calm down a child as examples.

In your opinion, when those needs listed above or related are handled, when do you return to your seat? Does it matter where you were seated prior to your need to get up? (as I think if you sit closer to the front compared to the back or middle of the church.)

To me, I was raised to not come back until there was a time the people were standing especially if you had to get up while people were still seated if possible. Also, to not leave during the Consecration unless it was very urgent to do so to handle such things listed in my first paragraph.


My rule is not to bother people and silence as much as I can.
If there is singing and movement and agitation, then your move is less noticed.
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  #3  
Old Jul 1, '12, 5:43 am
Rainaldo Rainaldo is offline
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Default Re: Leaving your seat during Mass and returning to it

I return at transition points even if there is no commotion such as standing. For example, between Psalm and Epistle.
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Old Jul 1, '12, 5:48 am
Seeker1961 Seeker1961 is offline
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Default Re: Leaving your seat during Mass and returning to it

I just saw something like this last week that made me smile. A little boy-no more than 10, left the pew, I assumed to use the rest room. He returned during the Consecration. Instead of entering the pew and disturbing the folks sitting there-he simply knelt on the floor at the end of the row near the aisle until everyone stood for the Our Father. Someone has taught this little boy well.
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Old Jul 1, '12, 7:06 am
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Pug Pug is offline
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Default Re: Leaving your seat during Mass and returning to it

Just wait in the narthex until you won't distract anyone. Also, if it is very crowded near the front, where I usually sit, then when I return I will slip into an empty back pew instead of disturbing those in my original pew. But I wouldn't do that if it were equally crowded front and back. Habits, I guess.
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  #6  
Old Jul 1, '12, 7:29 am
Neofight Neofight is offline
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Default Re: Leaving your seat during Mass and returning to it

Our parish has great ushers, and they give people the cue as to when to return to seats with the least disruption in the Mass.

If you have ushers, maybe it could be something incorporated into training.

Wow, there's a great parish ministry to get involved in!

Pax
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  #7  
Old Jul 1, '12, 7:32 am
maltmom maltmom is offline
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Default Re: Leaving your seat during Mass and returning to it

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seeker1961 View Post
I just saw something like this last week that made me smile. A little boy-no more than 10, left the pew, I assumed to use the rest room. He returned during the Consecration. Instead of entering the pew and disturbing the folks sitting there-he simply knelt on the floor at the end of the row near the aisle until everyone stood for the Our Father. Someone has taught this little boy well.
Such an expression of respect from a child so young. I pray he inspired some adults. I agree, someone has taught this young man very well.
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  #8  
Old Jul 1, '12, 7:39 am
ConstantineTG ConstantineTG is offline
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Default Re: Leaving your seat during Mass and returning to it

Just get out and and come back as you normally would.
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  #9  
Old Jul 1, '12, 8:44 am
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Rich C Rich C is offline
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Default Re: Leaving your seat during Mass and returning to it

Quote:
Originally Posted by MissRose73 View Post
To me, I was raised to not come back until there was a time the people were standing especially if you had to get up while people were still seated if possible. Also, to not leave during the Consecration unless it was very urgent to do so to handle such things listed in my first paragraph.
I was taught this, too. I know there is no universal rule, but it's a good custom and I'll teach it to my children, too.
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