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  #31  
Old Aug 6, '12, 12:46 pm
Antionach Antionach is offline
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Default Re: What is the Catholic stance on non-Trinity sects of Christianity?

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Originally Posted by SteveVH View Post
To answer your last question first, yes you would have to be re-baptized to enter the LDS Church. They absolutley do not accept any other baptism.
Interesting, for I know that if I am baptized in a Baptist Church, I don't need to be rebaptized if I go to the Assemblys of God for instance.

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As for the "Believer's Baptism", as you call it, this is a result of having no understanding of the nature of a sacrament after several hundred years of being separated from the origninal Church. Baptism is not just a person's public statement that they believe in Jesus Christ. I can certainly make that statement without getting wet. It is an act of God's grace. When God acts, something very real happens. Our souls are cleansed from sin and supernatural life is infused into us through the Holy Spirit who now dwells within us. Baptism is how we enter the family of God. Grace, by its very nature, is a free gift, requiring nothing from us. That is why infants can be baptized through the desire of their parents. If they wish to reject Christ later in life that option is always available to any of us. Baptism does not remove our free will.
Yes, that's the Catholic position.
I believe that God can draw people to Him. Either by someone witnessing about Jesus, or because a person starts seeking Him and starts reading the Holy Bible.
In this conversion-process, the person recieves the Holy Spirit sent by Jesus. Then this person is a reborn-Christian and should find a community where he/she is nourished.

Then you can go into deepening talks about Jesus and the Holy Bible with the local pastor and then you can be baptized as an outward sign that you are a reborn-Christian and believe in Christ Jesus...
  #32  
Old Aug 6, '12, 12:49 pm
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buffalo buffalo is offline
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Default Re: What is the Catholic stance on non-Trinity sects of Christianity?

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Originally Posted by Antionach View Post
Interesting, for I know that if I am baptized in a Baptist Church, I don't need to be rebaptized if I go to the Assemblys of God for instance.


If you are Baptized using the Trinitarian formula, you have been baptized into the Catholic (universal) Church.
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  #33  
Old Aug 6, '12, 11:00 pm
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SteveVH SteveVH is offline
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Default Re: What is the Catholic stance on non-Trinity sects of Christianity?

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Originally Posted by Antionach View Post
Interesting, for I know that if I am baptized in a Baptist Church, I don't need to be rebaptized if I go to the Assemblys of God for instance.
Nor do you need to be re-baptized to enter the Catholic Church. As Buffalo stated above, if you are baptised in the name of the Trinity, with water, you are baptised into the Catholic Church.

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Originally Posted by Antionach View Post
I believe that God can draw people to Him. Either by someone witnessing about Jesus, or because a person starts seeking Him and starts reading the Holy Bible.
Yes, there is no end to the ways that God calls all people to himself.

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Originally Posted by Antionach View Post
In this conversion-process, the person recieves the Holy Spirit sent by Jesus. Then this person is a reborn-Christian and should find a community where he/she is nourished.
The Catholic postion would be that we receive the Holy Spirit initially through Baptism (although the Holy Spirit is present in all of the sacraments). The conversion process should prompt one to desire the presence of the Holy Spirit and the person may be led by the Holy Spirit, but being drawn to God is not equivalent to receiving the Holy Spirit.

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Originally Posted by Antionach View Post
Then you can go into deepening talks about Jesus and the Holy Bible with the local pastor and then you can be baptized as an outward sign that you are a reborn-Christian and believe in Christ Jesus...
Or you could be baptised in order to cleanse your soul from sin.

"Repent, and let everyone of you be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins." (Acts 2:38)
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  #34  
Old Aug 6, '12, 11:08 pm
ConstantineTG ConstantineTG is offline
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Default Re: What is the Catholic stance on non-Trinity sects of Christianity?

The First Ecumenical Council has settled this question a long time ago. Anyone who denies Christ's divinity is anathematized.
  #35  
Old Aug 7, '12, 4:57 am
Lucky7 Lucky7 is offline
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Default Re: What is the Catholic stance on non-Trinity sects of Christianity?

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Originally Posted by Antionach View Post
Well, Baptists or Pentecostals or other denominations who do Believer's Baptism only, also don't accept an Infant Baptism... (Infant Baptism = "only" a blessing, as baby can't commit his/her live to Jesus. First give one's life to Jesus and then is the Baptism as an outward sign that belong to Jesus (and then you are officially recorded in your Church).)

Mhm, if I recieve a Believer's Baptism in, let's say, a Baptist Church, do I need to be rebaptized in the LDS Church?
And yet in the Book of Acts we have stories of whole households, not just adults, being baptized.
  #36  
Old Aug 7, '12, 6:57 pm
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SteveVH SteveVH is offline
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Default Re: What is the Catholic stance on non-Trinity sects of Christianity?

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Originally Posted by Lucky7 View Post
And yet in the Book of Acts we have stories of whole households, not just adults, being baptized.
Yes, we are to believe that there were no children under the age of reason in those households. I think the real problem is just a lack of understanding what a sacrament is. Even the term "sacrament" is not found in many Protestant denominations. It has been replaced with "ordinance" and has lost all original meaning.

The concept that God would freely give his grace and infuse an infant with divine life, absent any action on the part of the one being baptized, but rather the desire of the parents out of love for their child, is foreign to those who consider it an "ordinance". Baptism, as an ordinance, is really just a public statement of one's belief in Christ. There is no sanctifying grace involved. If one goes with this line of thinking then baptizing an infant would seem preposterous. Therefore they are forced to interpret the verse you chose in Acts as not including children under the age of reason. How they actually accomplish that mental feat is what I would like to know.
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