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  #1  
Old Sep 6, '07, 5:44 pm
spacecadet spacecadet is offline
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Default which Council put together the New Testament and when was it?

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Old Sep 6, '07, 5:48 pm
patrick457 patrick457 is offline
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Default Re: which Council put together the New Testament and when was it?

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The Synod of Hippo in 393 canonized the NT Canon and the Canon of the Septuagint; the Council of Carthage in 397 and 419 repearted it.
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Old Sep 6, '07, 11:03 pm
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Default Re: which Council put together the New Testament and when was it?

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The Synod of Hippo in 393 canonized the NT Canon and the Canon of the Septuagint; the Council of Carthage in 397 and 419 repearted it.
Pope Innocent approved the Councils (Hippo and Carthage) findings around 407AD (give or take 10 years). These local councils' findings were accepted by the whole Church, with only minimal opposition from time to time. St. Jerome is probably the most famous dissenter of the OT Canon, but his job was to translate, not to determine "inspiration of works". Because this Canon was still considered "non-binding", it could have been changed at any time by an Ecumenical Council or the Pope.

Then, as a result of the Protestant Reformation, the Council of Trent officially ratified the Canon, removing any chance of ever changing it within the Church.
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Old Sep 6, '07, 11:07 pm
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NotWorthy NotWorthy is offline
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Default Re: which Council put together the New Testament and when was it?

How do we know there was not further widespread dissension of the Canon? The Church would have called an Ecumenical Council (Church-wide, rather than local, like Hippo and Carthage) to determine the Canons. The amount of opposition presented by the Protestant Faiths is the only reason that Trent moved to "bind" the canon.

Although there were some dissenters from time to time, their voices were typically isolated and never gathered enough steam within the Church to present anything that could be considered strong opposition.
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Old Sep 7, '07, 6:01 am
Todd Easton Todd Easton is offline
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Default Re: which Council put together the New Testament and when was it?

Christians prior to the councils mentioned by the other posters were not completely clueless as to which books were to be received; there were earlier lists. One such earlier list of unknown authorship is the Muratorian Fragment, which dates to between A.D. 150 and 200. Though the beginning and ending portions of its listings are now missing, still in the part that now remains, it mentions nearly all of the books that are in our New Testament. It begins with mention of Luke as the third gospel and John as the fourth gospel. (Matthew and Mark are presumed to have been mentioned in the now missing beginning portion of the Fragment.) It then mentions, but not necessarily in this order, the Acts of the Apostles, thirteen of Paul's letters (Romans, 1 & 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, 1 & 2 Thessalonians, 1 & 2 Timothy, Titus, and Philemon), two of John's three letters, Jude, and John's Apocalypse (Revelation).

The surviving portion of the Muratorian Fragment does not mention Hebrews, James, 1 & 2 Peter, and one of John's letters.
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Old Sep 7, '07, 7:34 am
Digitonomy Digitonomy is online now
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Default Re: which Council put together the New Testament and when was it?

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Then, as a result of the Protestant Reformation, the Council of Trent officially ratified the Canon, removing any chance of ever changing it within the Church.
This is not true. Trent's ratification of the Canon did not remove the possibility of additional books being ratified, such as those used by the Orthodox.
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Old Sep 7, '07, 7:41 am
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Default Re: which Council put together the New Testament and when was it?

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This is not true. Trent's ratification of the Canon did not remove the possibility of additional books being ratified, such as those used by the Orthodox.
From what I understand, if a book was known and not considered inspired by Trent, then it would not have any further chance of being re-considered. The only ones that could be added are any books that are "discovered".

I'm not sure of these details, though.
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Old Sep 7, '07, 8:44 am
Digitonomy Digitonomy is online now
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Default Re: which Council put together the New Testament and when was it?

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From what I understand, if a book was known and not considered inspired by Trent, then it would not have any further chance of being re-considered. The only ones that could be added are any books that are "discovered".
I'm not holding my breath on say Psalm 151 finding its way into Catholic Bibles, but the Decree Concerning the Canonical Scriptures from the Council of Trent appears to be limited to confirming the inspired nature of books in the present canon, not preventing other books from being added. Here is the most relevant passage:
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But if any one receive not, as sacred and canonical, the said books entire with all their parts, as they have been used to be read in the Catholic Church, and as they are contained in the old Latin vulgate edition; and knowingly and deliberately condemn the traditions aforesaid; let him be anathema.
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Old Sep 7, '07, 8:59 am
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NotWorthy NotWorthy is offline
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Default Re: which Council put together the New Testament and when was it?

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I'm not holding my breath on say Psalm 151 finding its way into Catholic Bibles, but the Decree Concerning the Canonical Scriptures from the Council of Trent appears to be limited to confirming the inspired nature of books in the present canon, not preventing other books from being added. Here is the most relevant passage:
OK, so let's consider this. The Church deems that inspired books are necessary teachings for our salvation, right? So, the 3rd book of Maccabees is not necessary during Trent, but then can tomorrow decide that it is necessary for our Salvation? I'd be willing to bet that something like that would never happen.

So I guess you and I "won't hold our breaths" together, eh?
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Old Sep 7, '07, 11:56 am
Digitonomy Digitonomy is online now
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Default Re: which Council put together the New Testament and when was it?

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OK, so let's consider this. The Church deems that inspired books are necessary teachings for our salvation, right?
I'm familiar with the phrase, but you'll have to point to me where the Church has used it so I can read the context. The Gospel is necessary for our salvation, but I wouldn't personally described any particular book in that way - many faithful Christians have died without having access to even a single New Testament book. Is the Book of Habukkuk necessary for our salvation? I don't think so. It is inspired scripture, but its essential truths are found elsewhere. Same with the Orthodox canon(s), which I think is also accepted to some degree by some of the Eastern Catholic Churches.
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Old Sep 8, '07, 4:46 pm
Bishopite Bishopite is offline
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Default Re: which Council put together the New Testament and when was it?

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Pope Innocent approved the Councils (Hippo and Carthage) findings around 407AD (give or take 10 years). These local councils' findings were accepted by the whole Church, with only minimal opposition from time to time. St. Jerome is probably the most famous dissenter of the OT Canon, but his job was to translate, not to determine "inspiration of works". Because this Canon was still considered "non-binding", it could have been changed at any time by an Ecumenical Council or the Pope.

Then, as a result of the Protestant Reformation, the Council of Trent officially ratified the Canon, removing any chance of ever changing it within the Church.
Yes, the canon was non-binding and actually the first authortative citation of the canon was in 382 AD at the council of Rome under Pope Damasus. It wasn't a binding decision, however, it is the first citation by a council which Trent dogmatized.
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