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  #1  
Old Jan 25, '08, 4:36 pm
JohnL JohnL is offline
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Default Implications of Psalm 103 verse 20

The verse, from the NIV is as follows:
Praise the LORD, you his angels,
you mighty ones who do his bidding,
who obey his word.
My question is this, does this verse show David addressing the angels, instead of the Lord, in prayer?

John Calvin's commentary on the verse states: "That none may think that earthly creatures only are here put in subjection to God, the Psalmist chiefly addresses the angels."

Adam Clarke's commentary on the verse states: "He invites all the creatures of God to praise him, whether animate or inanimate: "All creatures, in all places of his dominion.""

I am quoting non-Catholic commentary as I believe that this verse is an example of not praying to God directly. If this is the case, I didn't think that Protestants agreed with this practice? In fact many Protestants have outright told me that that only God should be addressed in prayer.

Can someone please enlighten me? I doubt that my conclusion can be correct in the eyes of a Protestant.

Thanks!

John.
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  #2  
Old Jan 25, '08, 4:49 pm
EphelDuath EphelDuath is offline
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Join Date: December 27, 2006
Posts: 2,650
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Default Re: Implications of Psalm 103 verse 20

They're apparently making a semantic argument about the grammar. It doesn't say "bless the Lord, and all his angels," only "bless the Lord, all his angels." Which is arguable in modern English though the Hebrew indicates that it is a plurality, not an accusative sentence.

Two verses later, it says "bless the Lord, all his works." I suppose Calvin implies that David is speaking to all of the good works and telling them to bless the Lord? Of course not. This is absurd. Angels don't need prophets to guide them, only men.
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  #3  
Old Jan 25, '08, 7:25 pm
Nita Nita is online now
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Posts: 5,420
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Default Re: Implications of Psalm 103 verse 20

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnL View Post
The verse, from the NIV is as follows:
Praise the LORD, you his angels,
you mighty ones who do his bidding,
who obey his word.
My question is this, does this verse show David addressing the angels, instead of the Lord, in prayer?

John Calvin's commentary on the verse states: "That none may think that earthly creatures only are here put in subjection to God, the Psalmist chiefly addresses the angels."

Adam Clarke's commentary on the verse states: "He invites all the creatures of God to praise him, whether animate or inanimate: "All creatures, in all places of his dominion.""

I am quoting non-Catholic commentary as I believe that this verse is an example of not praying to God directly. If this is the case, I didn't think that Protestants agreed with this practice? In fact many Protestants have outright told me that that only God should be addressed in prayer.

Can someone please enlighten me? I doubt that my conclusion can be correct in the eyes of a Protestant.

Thanks!

John.
Thanks for pointing this passage out John. I would say it certainly shows that it was acceptable practice to pray to others besides God.

There is also the long passage in Daniel 3:24-90:
vs. 58: O ye angels of the Lord, bless the Lord: praise and exalt Him above all for ever.
vs 65: O all ye spirits of God, bless the Lord: praise and exalt Him above all for ever.
vs 86: O ye spirits and souls of the just, bless the Lord: praise and exalt Him above all for ever.


Unfortunately that portion of Daniel is not included in the Protestant bible. However, even if they do not consider it Scripture, it still serves as a historical record of Jewish prayer.

As to how Protestants view the passage, it would appear Calvin and Adam Clarke recognized that the Jewish faith allowed prayer to angels.

Nita
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  #4  
Old Jan 26, '08, 3:53 am
Todd Easton Todd Easton is offline
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Join Date: May 29, 2004
Posts: 3,269
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Default Re: Implications of Psalm 103 verse 20

In Psalm 148:2, the psalmist similarly addresses the angels, asking them to praise the Lord.

However, since the psalms are poems, these verses may merely be poetic literary devices intended to simply point out that the Lord is the Creator of all and is worthy of all praise.
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