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  #1  
Old Oct 29, '08, 5:15 am
kaygee kaygee is offline
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Default kolliva for the first anniversary of my father's death

Sunday is the first anniversary of my father's death. We are doing the one-year memorial for him that day in our Greek-Catholic (Melkite) mision. I'm in the process of making Kolliva for the first time. The wheat has been boiled and is currently drying, but I'm wondering how to do the final assembly. Can the final assembly be done the night before or must it be done the morning of the Memorial? If anyone has practical experience, Id appreciate some tips.

BTW to anyone who wonders what I'm talking about, there is an Eastern custom of offering a sort of candy made of boiled wheat, cinamon, nuts, sugar, rasins,etc. that looks like dirt but tastes sweet as a reminder that death is not the end and what follows death is wonderfully sweet.
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  #2  
Old Oct 29, '08, 6:53 am
bpbasilphx bpbasilphx is offline
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Default Re: kolliva "death candy"

The expression "death candy" is as offensive and tasteless as "Jesus cookies" or "smells and bells". Please do not use it.

You certainly have started making it early. Usually I make it Slavic style, which would simply involve draining the wheat (or rice) after cooking it, and then mixing the cinnamon, sugar, and whatever else (I've been known to put coconut in it) in the actual bowl itself.

FWIW, some Slavs and Romanians use a sweet bread instead. Then there was a pious parishioner who went the next step and made a torte.
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  #3  
Old Oct 29, '08, 7:12 am
kaygee kaygee is offline
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Default Re: kolliva

Quote:
Originally Posted by bpbasilphx View Post
The expression "death candy" is as offensive and tasteless as "Jesus cookies" or "smells and bells". Please do not use it.

You certainly have started making it early. Usually I make it Slavic style, which would simply involve draining the wheat (or rice) after cooking it, and then mixing the cinnamon, sugar, and whatever else (I've been known to put coconut in it) in the actual bowl itself.

FWIW, some Slavs and Romanians use a sweet bread instead. Then there was a pious parishioner who went the next step and made a torte.
I'm very sorry if I've offended anyone. I wish I could go back and retititle the thread. (I did hit the report this post button on my own original post asking for a change) That is the term I learned back when the custom was explained to me by an Orthodox priest way back when I was inquiring into Orthodoxy and first encountered the tradition. (we're talking 25 years ago.) The cookbook I'm using (published by a Greek Orthodox parish) suggests simmering the wheat for one full day then letting the wheat air dry for four or more days after boiling. Thanks be to God that this is the first time I've ever been called upon to make it.

Last edited by kaygee; Oct 29, '08 at 7:25 am.
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  #4  
Old Oct 29, '08, 7:55 am
Patchunky Patchunky is offline
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Default Re: kolliva "death candy"

Quote:
Originally Posted by kaygee View Post
Sunday is the first anniversary of my father's death. We are doing the one-year memorial for him that day in our Greek-Catholic (Melkite) mision. I'm in the process of making Kolliva for the first time. The wheat has been boiled and is currently drying, but I'm wondering how to do the final assembly. Can the final assembly be done the night before or must it be done the morning of the Memorial? If anyone has practical experience, Id appreciate some tips.

BTW to anyone who wonders what I'm talking about, there is an Eastern custom of offering a sort of candy made of boiled wheat, cinamon, nuts, sugar, rasins,etc. that looks like dirt but tastes sweet as a reminder that death is not the end and what follows death is wonderfully sweet.
One of my best friend's just did kolliva for his twin brother's anniversary. He mixed everything together in the pot and then put into a nice glass bowl. He made a cross out of Jordan almonds on top and then covered it with plastic wrap.

At the church, he took the plastic wrap off and put 3 candles in it for the blessing and then had plenty of plastic spoons for everyone to partake.

Hope this helps....
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  #5  
Old Oct 29, '08, 9:25 am
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T700 T700 is offline
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Default Re: kolliva

Quote:
Originally Posted by kaygee View Post
I'm very sorry if I've offended anyone. I wish I could go back and retititle the thread. (I did hit the report this post button on my own original post asking for a change) That is the term I learned back when the custom was explained to me by an Orthodox priest way back when I was inquiring into Orthodoxy and first encountered the tradition. (we're talking 25 years ago.) The cookbook I'm using (published by a Greek Orthodox parish) suggests simmering the wheat for one full day then letting the wheat air dry for four or more days after boiling. Thanks be to God that this is the first time I've ever been called upon to make it.
I wouldn't worry about it. I'm 48 and have never heard it called anything but "death candy".

Paul
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  #6  
Old Oct 29, '08, 1:07 pm
bpbasilphx bpbasilphx is offline
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Default Re: kolliva for the first anniversary of my father's death

**I wouldn't worry about it. I'm 48 and have never heard it called anything but "death candy".**

I never heard that expression until this morning.

FWIW, I'm 58, and was Chrismated over 30 years ago, and it's always been kollyva or kutiya (Slavic).
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  #7  
Old Oct 29, '08, 1:22 pm
juliamajor juliamajor is offline
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Default Re: kolliva for the first anniversary of my father's death

For us Latins can you expand on kolliva-meaning, origins etc. Thanks in advance!!
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  #8  
Old Oct 29, '08, 2:08 pm
kaygee kaygee is offline
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Default Re: kolliva for the first anniversary of my father's death

A Memorial Service (mnemosian) is traditionally offered in rembrance of the departed on significant anniversaries. Family members of the deceased prepare a tray of Kolliva consisting of boiled wheat kernels, raisins, almonds, welnuts, spices and powdered sugar, often decorated quite elaborately. The Kolliva is blessed during the service and distributed to the congregation. The offering of Kolliva is an ancient cutom and signifies that the dead will rise again just as the wheat, when planted in the earth sprouts and bears fruit. The various sweets added to the kolliva signify that after the Resurrection life will be sweet. As you can see from the posts above, traditions vary as to presentation and preparation
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  #9  
Old Oct 29, '08, 8:33 pm
rad rad is offline
 
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Default Re: kolliva "death candy"

Quote:
Originally Posted by bpbasilphx View Post
The expression "death candy" is as offensive and tasteless as "Jesus cookies" or "smells and bells". Please do not use it.

You certainly have started making it early. Usually I make it Slavic style, which would simply involve draining the wheat (or rice) after cooking it, and then mixing the cinnamon, sugar, and whatever else (I've been known to put coconut in it) in the actual bowl itself.

FWIW, some Slavs and Romanians use a sweet bread instead. Then there was a pious parishioner who went the next step and made a torte.
true orthodox and eastern catholics would never say anything like this when it comes to memorial services , for there departed loved ones its no joking manner for them...there serious when it comes to praying for their dead for there salvation...i attended many orthodox memorials they were very aww inspiring..joyfull and sorrowful at the same time...and very beautiful and plenty of incense.....plus the wheat dish blessed with wine was really delicious i liked it very much...mmmmm
Rad...
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  #10  
Old Nov 1, '08, 7:55 pm
Diak Diak is offline
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Default Re: kolliva for the first anniversary of my father's death

In the Ukrainian tradition the kutya is usually fairly simple - wheat, honey, nuts, and poppyseed with maybe a candle in the middle and the nuts arranged in a cross if very fancy.

Some choose rather to bake a small paskha loaf (a rich bread) instead of the kutya. I've done both for the Panakhyda or memorial Divine Liturgies for friends or relatives.
FDRLB
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  #11  
Old Nov 1, '08, 9:17 pm
ByzantineGirl ByzantineGirl is offline
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Default Re: kolliva for the first anniversary of my father's death

I prepare it, too, in the Slavic tradition. After Divine Liturgy and the Panajida, we take the Kutja to the parish social hall where we have little dixie cups and spoons (napkins, too) so that those who wish to partake can. When we did it in church, little ones dropped the gooey mess on the floor. As a "Baba-in-training" who has to clean the church, this is not fun to clean up after!
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  #12  
Old Nov 2, '08, 11:48 pm
rad rad is offline
 
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Default Re: kolliva "death candy"

Quote:
Originally Posted by rad View Post
true orthodox and eastern catholics would never say anything like this when it comes to memorial services , for there departed loved ones its no joking manner for them...there serious when it comes to praying for their dead for there salvation...i attended many orthodox memorials they were very aww inspiring..joyfull and sorrowful at the same time...and very beautiful and plenty of incense.....plus the wheat dish blessed with wine was really delicious i liked it very much...mmmmm
Rad...

forgot to mention the shots of alcohol also with the koljivo...mmmmm
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