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  #1  
Old Jun 29, '10, 2:41 pm
mark a mark a is offline
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Default "A Rabbi lead me to Rome"

The above story is in This Rock magazine: http://www.catholic.com/thisrock/2010/1003dr.asp

In this story, a Rabbi is visiting a patient in the hospital. Here's a clip:
Quote:
Then the rabbi asked Mr. Smith a very unusual question. "What is the Hebrew name of Joannaís mother?"

The husband thought about it for a moment. "Gee, I donít know. Why do you ask?"

"Well, I was going to ask Joanna the name of her mother, but she was already asleep by the time I found her."

"Why would you need to know her motherís name?" her husband asked.

The rabbi explained, "We Jews believe that if someone is suffering and we invoke his or her motherís name in prayer, then God will be more merciful in granting your intercession for that person."
Has anyone heard of this?

Thanks in advance!!
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  #2  
Old Jun 30, '10, 1:25 pm
mark a mark a is offline
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Default Re: "A Rabbi lead me to Rome"

bump
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  #3  
Old Jun 30, '10, 4:45 pm
Jon_S Jon_S is offline
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Default Re: "A Rabbi lead me to Rome"

I have seen web sites that have prayers for the sick that ask for the person's name as well as that person's mother.

http://www.jewishealing.com/distance_healing_intro.html

http://www.interfaithfamily.com/spir...aging_Dr.shtml

I don't know how reliable those sites are. I would check around more if I had time.

A rabbi lead me to Rome too. His name is Jesus. (John 1:49)
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  #4  
Old Jun 30, '10, 6:14 pm
mark a mark a is offline
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Default Re: "A Rabbi lead me to Rome"

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Originally Posted by Jon_S View Post
I have seen web sites that have prayers for the sick that ask for the person's name as well as that person's mother.

http://www.jewishealing.com/distance_healing_intro.html

http://www.interfaithfamily.com/spir...aging_Dr.shtml

I don't know how reliable those sites are. I would check around more if I had time.

A rabbi lead me to Rome too. His name is Jesus. (John 1:49)
Thanks so much, Jon S!!
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  #5  
Old Jun 30, '10, 6:51 pm
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LionHeart777 LionHeart777 is offline
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Default Re: "A Rabbi lead me to Rome"

I don't have any information, but thanks for the article.
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  #6  
Old Jun 30, '10, 8:23 pm
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JReducation JReducation is offline
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Default Re: "A Rabbi lead me to Rome"

I was born Jewish and despite being a Catholic and Franciscan, still consider myself very much a Jew. It's like tyring to give up your Irishness because you no longer pray to St. Patrick. Just as there is a little more to being Irish, there is also more to being Jewish. Though I admit that faith is the centrality of the Jewish identity.

That being said, it has been part of the faith of orthodox and other conservative Jews that the God has a very special place in his heart for mothers. He never denies the prayer of the mother. That's actually the way it's taught to us as children.

Unfortuantely, Jews today, just like every other group, have slipped into a more secular version of Judaism. The ethnict expessions of Judaism are still there, but the religious expressions are withering away.

Anyway, there you have it. God always listens to the prayer of a mother.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF
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Fraternally,

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Won't you join the Rosary Crusade for Life?
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  #7  
Old Jul 1, '10, 5:53 am
mark a mark a is offline
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Default Re: "A Rabbi lead me to Rome"

Quote:
Originally Posted by JReducation View Post
I was born Jewish and despite being a Catholic and Franciscan, still consider myself very much a Jew. It's like tyring to give up your Irishness because you no longer pray to St. Patrick. Just as there is a little more to being Irish, there is also more to being Jewish. Though I admit that faith is the centrality of the Jewish identity.

That being said, it has been part of the faith of orthodox and other conservative Jews that the God has a very special place in his heart for mothers. He never denies the prayer of the mother. That's actually the way it's taught to us as children.

Unfortuantely, Jews today, just like every other group, have slipped into a more secular version of Judaism. The ethnict expessions of Judaism are still there, but the religious expressions are withering away.

Anyway, there you have it. God always listens to the prayer of a mother.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF
Thanks for your thoughts.
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  #8  
Old Jul 1, '10, 7:46 am
kellsworld00 kellsworld00 is offline
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Default Re: "A Rabbi lead me to Rome"

Speaking of Rome.......

I need advice regarding purchase of rosary blessed by Pope.

As I'm having trouble navigating this board, I asked my question here.

No hijack intended, I apologize, but require guidance from those with experience.

Thanks,

Kelly
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  #9  
Old Jul 1, '10, 8:23 am
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jen fla jen fla is offline
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Default Re: "A Rabbi lead me to Rome"

Quote:
Originally Posted by kellsworld00 View Post
Speaking of Rome.......

I need advice regarding purchase of rosary blessed by Pope.

As I'm having trouble navigating this board, I asked my question here.

No hijack intended, I apologize, but require guidance from those with experience.

Thanks,

Kelly
hi kelly and welcome to caf!

i *think* (sometimes it is hard to know the best place to post a question) i would post your question in the spirituality section. you should find many people there that can help you with good rosary websites and answers.

peace and again, welcome!

-jen
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  #10  
Old Jul 1, '10, 8:27 am
csmatyi csmatyi is offline
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Default Re: "A Rabbi lead me to Rome"

"A rabbi lead me to Rome".

I hope you went there for summer vacation.
Did he lead you out again?
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  #11  
Old Jul 1, '10, 10:14 am
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JReducation JReducation is offline
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Default Re: "A Rabbi lead me to Rome"

Quote:
Originally Posted by kellsworld00 View Post
Speaking of Rome.......

I need advice regarding purchase of rosary blessed by Pope.

As I'm having trouble navigating this board, I asked my question here.

No hijack intended, I apologize, but require guidance from those with experience.

Thanks,

Kelly
You cannot purchase a rosary blessed by the Holy Father or by any priest. The selling of blessed objects is simony. You can buy one and ask someone to get it blessed by him. If you know anyone who is going to Rome, the Holy Father blessed everyone's religious objects at his Wednesday audience.

If someone offers to sell you something that is blessed, it is either a fraud or they are commiting a grave sin. Don't get sucked in.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF
__________________
Fraternally,

Brother JR, FFV

"Forget not love."


Won't you join the Rosary Crusade for Life?
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  #12  
Old Jul 1, '10, 12:44 pm
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JharekCarnelian JharekCarnelian is offline
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Default Re: "A Rabbi lead me to Rome"

Quote:
Originally Posted by JReducation View Post
I was born Jewish and despite being a Catholic and Franciscan, still consider myself very much a Jew. It's like tyring to give up your Irishness because you no longer pray to St. Patrick. Just as there is a little more to being Irish, there is also more to being Jewish. Though I admit that faith is the centrality of the Jewish identity.

That being said, it has been part of the faith of orthodox and other conservative Jews that the God has a very special place in his heart for mothers. He never denies the prayer of the mother. That's actually the way it's taught to us as children.

Unfortuantely, Jews today, just like every other group, have slipped into a more secular version of Judaism. The ethnict expessions of Judaism are still there, but the religious expressions are withering away.

Anyway, there you have it. God always listens to the prayer of a mother.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF
I've never actually prayed to St. Patrick at all despite been Irish myself Most Jews are very secular in the UK where I live, there is a Hassidic community nearby and they are prone to been mocked even from within the faith by other Jews at times I've noticed. Although sometimes that mockery is of an uneasy kind and somewhat guilty as though they were wondering what it is the Hassidic community has in their lives that they are missing.
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  #13  
Old Jul 1, '10, 1:29 pm
mark a mark a is offline
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Default Re: "A Rabbi lead me to Rome"

Quote:
Originally Posted by csmatyi View Post
"A rabbi lead me to Rome".

I hope you went there for summer vacation.
My understanding is that Romans aren't too big on air conditioning, which leaves me somewhere besides Rome during the summer.
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  #14  
Old Jul 1, '10, 5:41 pm
Joe Kelley Joe Kelley is offline
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Default Re: "A Rabbi lead me to Rome"

Quote:
Originally Posted by mark a View Post
My understanding is that Romans aren't too big on air conditioning, which leaves me somewhere besides Rome during the summer.
Note that the Pope leaves for his summer residence at this point in the year. He avoids Rome in the summer.
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  #15  
Old Jul 1, '10, 8:13 pm
GerardMajella GerardMajella is offline
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Default Re: "A Rabbi lead me to Rome"

From a modern Orthodox Jewish perspective, it is only proper for a Jew to pray directly to God. Praying to an intercessor - such as a saint, etc. - is not considered proper.

This is even evident in a few of the Jewish prayers said in the traditional Jewish prayer book ("Siddur"). Example:

"I believe with complete faith that the Creator, Blessed is His Name ---- to Him alone is it proper to pray and it is not proper to pray to any other." (Article 5 of the 13 Principles of Faith, page 179, The Complete Art Scroll Siddur)

Jewish Law, as interpreted from a Modern Orthodox Jewish perspective, strictly prohibits making use of a mediator or an agent between oneself and the Almighty. The reasoning is stated in the Second commandment: "You shall not recognize the gods of others before My Presence." To pray to anyone besides God would be considered idolatrous.
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