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  #1  
Old Dec 24, '10, 12:33 pm
basinite basinite is offline
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Default Holy Day's of Obligation and Bishops Jurisdiction issues.

If you live in X diocese, but belong to a parish located in Y diocese. Which Bishop do you obey when it comes to Holy Days of Obligations?

Example;

If the bishop of X diocese (which is the bishop who’s jurisdiction you live under) waves Jan 1st as a Holy Day of Obligation because it falls on New Year’s Day, but the bishop of Y diocese (which is the bishop who’s jurisdiction your parish belongs to) keeps it intact. Which one are you obligated to obey? If you missed the Holy Day would it be a sin?
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  #2  
Old Dec 24, '10, 1:00 pm
Friar David, O.Carm Friar David, O.Carm is offline
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Default Re: Holy Day's of Obligation and Bishops Jurisdiction issues.

I believe you fall under the bishop whose diocese you live in.

While you might attend a different parish, technically you are still a member of your territorial parish.
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  #3  
Old Dec 24, '10, 1:07 pm
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curlycool89 curlycool89 is offline
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Default Re: Holy Day's of Obligation and Bishops Jurisdiction issues.

Quote:
Originally Posted by basinite View Post
If you live in X diocese, but belong to a parish located in Y diocese. Which Bishop do you obey when it comes to Holy Days of Obligations?

Example;

If the bishop of X diocese (which is the bishop who’s jurisdiction you live under) waves Jan 1st as a Holy Day of Obligation because it falls on New Year’s Day, but the bishop of Y diocese (which is the bishop who’s jurisdiction your parish belongs to) keeps it intact. Which one are you obligated to obey? If you missed the Holy Day would it be a sin?
You always follow the Bishop of the diocese in which you physically live (so Bishop of the Diocese of X).
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  #4  
Old Dec 24, '10, 1:35 pm
bayernfan bayernfan is offline
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Default Re: Holy Day's of Obligation and Bishops Jurisdiction issues.

I've always heard that, when traveling, you need to follow the jurisdiction of the ordinary in whose diocese you wake up.

So, if you wake up in X Diocese and they say Jan. 1st is a holy day, then you must go to Mass to fulfill the obligation, even if your parish is in Y Diocese which says it isn't (but a Mass at any Catholic Church will fulfill your obligation).

(Just an example)
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  #5  
Old Dec 25, '10, 7:24 am
The Old Medic The Old Medic is offline
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Default Re: Holy Day's of Obligation and Bishops Jurisdiction issues.

This is a question that has multiple answers.

As an example, if you are in the military, you may well live in one diocese, but you are ALWAYS under the jurisdiction of the Military Ordinate. The rules set up by the Military Ordinate will apply to you, no matter where in the world you happen to be physically located.

I ran into this while stati0ned in Germany in the early 1960's. I did a significant amount of work at a local convent, and one day my buddy and I brought sandwiches out on a Friday afternoon. Mother Superior was scandalized that we were eating meat on Friday. I pointed out to her that we fell under the Military Ordinary (then the Archbishop of New York), who had waived the rule about not eating meat on Fridays for all members of the US Armed Forces.

She took this to the Bishop of Bamberg, who informed her that yes, all soldiers of the US came under the rules of the Military Ordinate.

For civilians, you come under the jurisdiction of the Bishop that covers where you reside. The same rules would apply as if you were traveling on vacation. If, in your diocese, New Years Day is a Holy Day of Obligation (not waived), then it would apply to you.

Of course, Sunday is ALSO a Holy Day of Obligation in a sense, as you are required to attend Mass on Sunday's too.
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  #6  
Old Dec 25, '10, 7:50 am
malphono malphono is offline
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Default Re: Holy Day's of Obligation and Bishops Jurisdiction issues.

Quote:
Originally Posted by basinite View Post
If you live in X diocese, but belong to a parish located in Y diocese. Which Bishop do you obey when it comes to Holy Days of Obligations?

Example;

If the bishop of X diocese (which is the bishop who’s jurisdiction you live under) waves Jan 1st as a Holy Day of Obligation because it falls on New Year’s Day, but the bishop of Y diocese (which is the bishop who’s jurisdiction your parish belongs to) keeps it intact. Which one are you obligated to obey? If you missed the Holy Day would it be a sin?
I think this may be a case of domicile vs quasi-domicile. That is very different from being a traveler or a transient.

Quote:
Can. 102 §1. Domicile is acquired by that residence within the territory of a certain parish or at least of a diocese, which either is joined with the intention of remaining there permanently unless called away or has been protracted for five complete years.

§2. Quasi-domicile is acquired by residence within the territory of a certain parish or at least of a diocese, which either is joined with the intention of remaining there for at least three months unless called away or has in fact been protracted for three months.

§3. A domicile or quasi-domicile within the territory of a parish is called parochial; within the territory of a diocese, even though not within a parish, diocesan.
In such a case, the person is under the jurisdiction of whichever of the two he finds himself at a particular time.
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  #7  
Old Dec 25, '10, 8:53 pm
ConstantineTG ConstantineTG is offline
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Default Re: Holy Day's of Obligation and Bishops Jurisdiction issues.

Also to add to all the other answers, such decisions are hardly made by individual Bishops and they usually consult each other and make a decision as an Episcopal Conference. The purpose of this is that within a given territory or country, there isn't much variation from one diocese to the next. Of course nearby places like cities and towns along the border of the US and Canada may have this issue since each country has their own Episcopal Conference.
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  #8  
Old Dec 25, '10, 9:30 pm
thomasf thomasf is offline
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Default Re: Holy Day's of Obligation and Bishops Jurisdiction issues.

Just to point out, Jan 1 is always New Years Day. I don't see why that would negate it from being a Holy Day of Obligation.
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  #9  
Old Dec 26, '10, 3:57 am
laszlo laszlo is offline
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Default Re: Holy Day's of Obligation and Bishops Jurisdiction issues.

Can. 100 A person is said to be: a resident (incola) in the place where the person has a domicile; a temporary resident (advena) in the place where the person has a quasi-domicile; a traveler (peregrinus) if the person is outside the place of a domicile or quasi-domicile which is still retained; a transient (vagus) if the person does not have a domicile or quasi- domicile anywhere.

Can. 107 §1. Through both domicile and quasi-domicile, each person acquires his or her pastor and ordinary.

§2. The proper pastor or ordinary of a transient is the pastor or local ordinary where the transient is actually residing.

The logic says that you are under the jurisdiction of the Ordinary of your residence (domicile) . However if due to the abrogation of the obligation to attend Mass there are no Masses in the place were you travel, you have no obligation to attend Masses.

The unfortunate thing is that there is no unity in the Catholic Church, hopefully the Canon Law will follow the facts.
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  #10  
Old Dec 26, '10, 5:16 am
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Matthew Holford Matthew Holford is offline
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Default Re: Holy Day's of Obligation and Bishops Jurisdiction issues.

The decision does not fall to individual bishops. The Code of Canon Law (Can. 1246 §2) gives the power to suppress holy days of obligation to episcopal conferences, subject to their decision being reviewed and confirmed by the Holy See.
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  #11  
Old Dec 26, '10, 9:16 am
Justin1224 Justin1224 is offline
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Default Re: Holy Day's of Obligation and Bishops Jurisdiction issues.

sometime in the 90s it was decided that if a Holy Day of Obligation fell on a Saturday or Monday that there the obligation to go to mass that day is waived. I guess they did this because there are those catholics who would no be up to going to mass two days in a row. This only applies to the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God (which is next Saturday), the Assumption and All Saint's Day.
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