Catholic FAQ


Latest Threads
newest posts



Go Back   Catholic Answers Forums > Forums > Apologetics > Moral Theology
 

Welcome to Catholic Answers Forums, the largest Catholic Community on the Web.

Here you can join over 400,000 members from around the world discussing all things Catholic. Membership is open to all, Catholic and non-Catholic alike, who seek the Truth with Charity.

To gain full access, you must register for a FREE account. Registered members are able to:
  • Submit questions about the faith to experts from Catholic Answers
  • Participate in all forum discussions
  • Communicate privately with Catholics from around the world
  • Plus join a prayer group, read with the Book Club, and much more.
Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. So join our community today!

Have a question about registration or your account log-in? Just contact our Support Hotline.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search Thread Display
  #1  
Old Jul 16, '11, 7:38 am
Irishgal49's Avatar
Irishgal49 Irishgal49 is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: June 21, 2011
Posts: 1,400
Religion: Agnostic
Send a message via Yahoo to Irishgal49
Default Difference between chastity and celibacy?

Good Morning,

I am wanting to know, is there a difference between chastity and celibacy? Can someone explain this to me, please? I want to know what I'm asking the Blessed Mother to help me with and I'm not sure about whether or not there is a difference in the two.

I heard someone saying that nuns take a vow of chastity while priests take a vow of celibacy. Is this true?

God Bless and Thanks,

Lorrie
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old Jul 16, '11, 9:30 am
HerrZJA HerrZJA is offline
Junior Member
Prayer Warrior
 
Join Date: October 10, 2010
Posts: 360
Religion: Roman Catholic
Send a message via Skype™ to HerrZJA
Default Re: Difference between chastity and celibacy?

From my understanding, Chastity is living within chaste bounds as a layperson, whereas celibacy refers to the stricter, lifelong vows professed by priests and religious orders.

My understanding is that Chastity offers the possibility of marriage (and the things that come with it) whereas celibacy is a permanent state.
__________________
Probing the Idea of Faith with Reason
http://auditorandagentleman.blogspot.com
Latest Article: His Holiness, a Saint, and A Frank Discussion
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old Jul 16, '11, 9:36 am
valentino valentino is offline
Regular Member
Forum Supporter
 
Join Date: January 31, 2011
Posts: 2,276
Religion: catholic
Default Re: Difference between chastity and celibacy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishgal49 View Post
Good Morning,

I am wanting to know, is there a difference between chastity and celibacy? Can someone explain this to me, please? I want to know what I'm asking the Blessed Mother to help me with and I'm not sure about whether or not there is a difference in the two.

I heard someone saying that nuns take a vow of chastity while priests take a vow of celibacy. Is this true?

God Bless and Thanks,

Lorrie
Most definitely.you can be married an live a chaste life.But celibacy is going without sexual relations.A person can be both chaste and celibate.In fact anyone who is celibate is probably chaste.but no always.One can forgo sexual relations and still be unchaste.Mayve like the dirty old man.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old Jul 16, '11, 7:20 pm
alwayslooking's Avatar
alwayslooking alwayslooking is offline
Junior Member
Prayer Warrior
 
Join Date: January 5, 2011
Posts: 253
Religion: Latin Rite Catholic
Default Re: Difference between chastity and celibacy?

One may have relations within the bounds of marriage in a chaste life. In a celibate life one may never have relations.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old Jul 16, '11, 8:38 pm
Bruised Reed's Avatar
Bruised Reed Bruised Reed is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: June 27, 2004
Posts: 5,483
Default Re: Difference between chastity and celibacy?

Chaste refers to proper use of one's sexuality according to your state in life. All are called to chastity no matter your state in life.
l
Celebate means not being married (also no sex, just to be clear). This applies to most, but not all, priests and religious.

Continent refers to married couples not having relations, eg, while TTA using NFP. They may have relations and are able to but don't.
__________________
Christianity is not about building a secure little niche in the world where you can live with your perfect little wife and your perfect little children in your beautiful little house where you have no gays or minority groups anywhere near you. Christianity is about learning to love like Jesus loved
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old Jul 17, '11, 7:25 am
thistle thistle is offline
Forum Elder
 
Join Date: August 23, 2005
Posts: 20,163
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: Difference between chastity and celibacy?

Modern Catholic Dictionary:

CHASTITY. The virtue that moderates the desire for sexual pleasure according to the principles of faith and right reason. In married people, chastity moderates the desire in conformity with their state of life; in unmarried people who wish to marry, the desire is moderated by abstention until (or unless) they get married; in those who resolve not to marry, the desire is sacrificed entirely.

Chastity and purity, modesty and decency are comparable in that they have the basic meaning of freedom from whatever is lewd or salacious. Yet they also differ. Chastity implies an opposition to the immoral in the sense of lustful or licentious. It suggests refraining from all acts or thoughts that are not in accordance with the Church's teaching about the use of one's reproductive powers. It particularly stresses restraint and an avoidance of anything that might defile or make unclean the soul because the body has not been controlled in the exercise of its most imperious passion. (Etym. Latin castus, morally pure, unstained.)


CELIBACY. The state of being unmarried and, in Church usage, of one who has never been married. Catholicism distinguishes between lay and ecclesiastical celibacy, and in both cases a person freely chooses for religious reasons to remain celibate.

Lay celibacy was practiced already in the early Church. The men were called "the continent" (continentes) and women "virgins" (virgines). They were also known as ascetics who were encouraged to follow this form of life by St. Paul. According to the Apostle, "An unmarried man can devote himself to the Lord's affairs, all he need worry about is pleasing the Lord . . . In the same way an unmarried woman, like a young girl, can devote herself to the Lord's affairs; all she need worry about is being holy in body and spirit" (I Corinthians 7:32, 34). Throughout history the Church has fostered a celibate life in the lay state. Towering among the means of sanctity available to the laity, declared the Second Vatican Council, "is that precious gift of divine grace given to some by the Father to devote themselves to God alone more easily with an undivided heart in virginity or celibacy. This perfect continence for love of the kingdom of heaven has always been held in high esteem by the Church as a sign and stimulus of love, and as a singular source of spiritual fertility in the world" (Constitution on the Church, 42).

Ecclesiastical celibacy was a logical development of Christ's teaching about continence (Matthew 19:10-12). The first beginnings of religious life were seen in the self-imposed practice of celibacy among men and women who wished to devote themselves to a lifetime following Christ in the practice of the evangelical counsels. Celibacy was one of the features of the earliest hermits and a requirement of the first monastic foundations under St. Pachomius (c. 290-346). Over the centuries religious celibacy has been the subject of the Church's frequent legislation. The Second Vatican Council named chastity first among the evangelical counsels to be practiced by religious and said that "it is a special symbol of heavenly benefits, and for religious it is a most effective means of dedicating themselves wholeheartedly to the divine service and the works of the apostolate" (Decree on the Up-to-date Renewal of Religious Life, 12). (Etym. Latin caelibatus, single life, celibacy.)
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old Jul 17, '11, 7:33 am
Singapore Nick Singapore Nick is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: May 27, 2011
Posts: 47
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: Difference between chastity and celibacy?

Quote:
On 1 Tim. 3:2 - A bishop then must be blameless, the husband of one wife…
Though a catholic myself, the above scriptural text always puzzled me. What it means ? I understand that our early fathers were married and it was much later celibacy was enforced in the Latin rite.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old Jul 17, '11, 4:33 pm
thistle thistle is offline
Forum Elder
 
Join Date: August 23, 2005
Posts: 20,163
Religion: Catholic
Default Re: Difference between chastity and celibacy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Singapore Nick View Post
Though a catholic myself, the above scriptural text always puzzled me. What it means ? I understand that our early fathers were married and it was much later celibacy was enforced in the Latin rite.
http://oce.catholic.com/index.php?ti..._of_the_Clergy
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old Jul 18, '11, 3:05 am
Irishgal49's Avatar
Irishgal49 Irishgal49 is offline
Regular Member
 
Join Date: June 21, 2011
Posts: 1,400
Religion: Agnostic
Send a message via Yahoo to Irishgal49
Default Re: Difference between chastity and celibacy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by thistle View Post
Modern Catholic Dictionary:

CHASTITY. The virtue that moderates the desire for sexual pleasure according to the principles of faith and right reason. In married people, chastity moderates the desire in conformity with their state of life; in unmarried people who wish to marry, the desire is moderated by abstention until (or unless) they get married; in those who resolve not to marry, the desire is sacrificed entirely.

Chastity and purity, modesty and decency are comparable in that they have the basic meaning of freedom from whatever is lewd or salacious. Yet they also differ. Chastity implies an opposition to the immoral in the sense of lustful or licentious. It suggests refraining from all acts or thoughts that are not in accordance with the Church's teaching about the use of one's reproductive powers. It particularly stresses restraint and an avoidance of anything that might defile or make unclean the soul because the body has not been controlled in the exercise of its most imperious passion. (Etym. Latin castus, morally pure, unstained.)


CELIBACY. The state of being unmarried and, in Church usage, of one who has never been married. Catholicism distinguishes between lay and ecclesiastical celibacy, and in both cases a person freely chooses for religious reasons to remain celibate.

Lay celibacy was practiced already in the early Church. The men were called "the continent" (continentes) and women "virgins" (virgines). They were also known as ascetics who were encouraged to follow this form of life by St. Paul. According to the Apostle, "An unmarried man can devote himself to the Lord's affairs, all he need worry about is pleasing the Lord . . . In the same way an unmarried woman, like a young girl, can devote herself to the Lord's affairs; all she need worry about is being holy in body and spirit" (I Corinthians 7:32, 34). Throughout history the Church has fostered a celibate life in the lay state. Towering among the means of sanctity available to the laity, declared the Second Vatican Council, "is that precious gift of divine grace given to some by the Father to devote themselves to God alone more easily with an undivided heart in virginity or celibacy. This perfect continence for love of the kingdom of heaven has always been held in high esteem by the Church as a sign and stimulus of love, and as a singular source of spiritual fertility in the world" (Constitution on the Church, 42).

Ecclesiastical celibacy was a logical development of Christ's teaching about continence (Matthew 19:10-12). The first beginnings of religious life were seen in the self-imposed practice of celibacy among men and women who wished to devote themselves to a lifetime following Christ in the practice of the evangelical counsels. Celibacy was one of the features of the earliest hermits and a requirement of the first monastic foundations under St. Pachomius (c. 290-346). Over the centuries religious celibacy has been the subject of the Church's frequent legislation. The Second Vatican Council named chastity first among the evangelical counsels to be practiced by religious and said that "it is a special symbol of heavenly benefits, and for religious it is a most effective means of dedicating themselves wholeheartedly to the divine service and the works of the apostolate" (Decree on the Up-to-date Renewal of Religious Life, 12). (Etym. Latin caelibatus, single life, celibacy.)
Thanks so much, that was a great explanation. I also appreciated others contributions. One other question: It says celibacy is someone who has never married. But there are priests who are widowed and become priests later in life, are they considered celibate?

Thanks everyone for great comments!

Lorrie
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old Jul 21, '11, 2:42 pm
vikingwarlord77 vikingwarlord77 is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: July 19, 2011
Posts: 16
Religion: philosophy
Default Re: Difference between chastity and celibacy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishgal49 View Post
Good Morning,

I am wanting to know, is there a difference between chastity and celibacy? Can someone explain this to me, please? I want to know what I'm asking the Blessed Mother to help me with and I'm not sure about whether or not there is a difference in the two.

I heard someone saying that nuns take a vow of chastity while priests take a vow of celibacy. Is this true?

God Bless and Thanks,

Lorrie
yes there is a difference. celibacy is the vow to never have sex. chastity is about the heart and living in a state of love. the three vows chastity, poverty and obedience come from the three states of being cor chap 13 says we should be in. chastity=love poverty=hope obedience=faith.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Go Back   Catholic Answers Forums > Forums > Apologetics > Moral Theology

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search Thread
Search Thread:

Advanced Search
Display

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



Prayer Intentions

Most Active Groups
8457Meet and talk,talk talk
Last by: suko
5143CAF Prayer Warriors Support Group
Last by: UpUpAndAway
4424Devotion to the Sorrowful Mother
Last by: DesertSister62
4037OCD/Scrupulosity Group
Last by: eschator83
3863SOLITUDE
Last by: beth40n2
3735Let's empty Purgatory
Last by: RJB
3320Petitions Before the Blessed Sacrament
Last by: Amiciel
3283Poems and Reflections
Last by: tonyg
3224Catholic Vegetarians & Vegans
Last by: 4elise
3109For seniors and shut- ins
Last by: RevDrJBTDDPhD



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:01 am.

Home RSS Feeds - Home - Archive - Top

Copyright © 2004-2014, Catholic Answers.