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  #1  
Old Feb 26, '12, 5:41 pm
Godislove4ever Godislove4ever is offline
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Default Different rites of the Catholic Church

What are the different rites of the catholic church? do their views differ from the "mainstream" latin rite?
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  #2  
Old Feb 26, '12, 9:23 pm
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Default Re: Different rites of the Catholic Church

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Originally Posted by Godislove4ever View Post
What are the different rites of the catholic church?
There are many Eastern Rites which are in full communion with Rome, and recognize the Pope as their spiritual leader. Wikipedia lists at least 14 (and the list is not complete).
Quote:
do their views differ from the "mainstream" latin rite?
There are minor (and insignificant) differences. For example, in Latin Churches, the bread and wine of Eucharist are transformed into the Body and Blood of Our Lord at the words of institution ("This is my Body... This is my Blood). Eastern Catholics generally believe this transformation occurs in the sentence immediately preceding this, a part called the epiclesis ("Lord, send down your Spirit upon these gifts..."). In a Latin Rite Mass, when bells are used, they will be rung once at the epiclesis - in honor of the Eastern traditions.

In the Latin Rite, the minister of the Sacrament of Holy Matrimony are considered to be the bride and groom, who mutually administer the Sacrament to each other; the officiating minister (deacon, priest, or Bishop) witnesses the Sacrament and pronounces the Church's blessing. In the Eastern Rites, the minister of the Sacrament is considered to be the officiating minister (not the bride and groom) - but he must ask permission of the bride and groom to perform the marriage (the minister need not seek permission to perform any other Sacrament).

There are differences in the belief in the nature of hell. Latin theologians tend to focus on the punitive aspects of hell (fire and brimstone). Eastern theologians tend to focus on the dark and empty nature of hell - deprived of the presence of God. I am not aware that either belief has been considered formal doctrine of either Communion.

There are also minor differences in practice (apart from belief). In the Latin Rite, children are not usually admitted to Holy Communion until they have reached the age of reason (currently about eight years of age in Western countries). In the East, children are admitted to Holy Communion upon Baptism - even as infants (they receive the Body and Blood in a manner in which the Host is dissolved into the Precious Blood (a type of intinction) and administered via a very small spoon).

These differences in both belief and practice are in no way contradictory. It does not matter whether if the bread and wine become the Body and Blood at this particular sentence, or that particular (immediately following) sentence. By the time anyone (including the celebrant) receives Eucharist, it is fully valid under either opinion. If a marriage is conducted according to the prescriptions of either Latin or Eastern Rites, it would be fully valid under all Rites.

There are no differences in which Latin or Eastern beliefs would ultimately render each other contradictory, where Sacramental validity would be called into question.
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  #3  
Old May 19, '12, 8:47 pm
Caspar Caspar is offline
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Default Re: Different rites of the Catholic Church

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Originally Posted by DavidFilmer View Post
There are many Eastern Rites which are in full communion with Rome, and recognize the Pope as their spiritual leader. Wikipedia lists at least 14 (and the list is not complete).

There are minor (and insignificant) differences. For example, in Latin Churches, the bread and wine of Eucharist are transformed into the Body and Blood of Our Lord at the words of institution ("This is my Body... This is my Blood). Eastern Catholics generally believe this transformation occurs in the sentence immediately preceding this, a part called the epiclesis ("Lord, send down your Spirit upon these gifts..."). In a Latin Rite Mass, when bells are used, they will be rung once at the epiclesis - in honor of the Eastern traditions.

In the Latin Rite, the minister of the Sacrament of Holy Matrimony are considered to be the bride and groom, who mutually administer the Sacrament to each other; the officiating minister (deacon, priest, or Bishop) witnesses the Sacrament and pronounces the Church's blessing. In the Eastern Rites, the minister of the Sacrament is considered to be the officiating minister (not the bride and groom) - but he must ask permission of the bride and groom to perform the marriage (the minister need not seek permission to perform any other Sacrament).

There are differences in the belief in the nature of hell. Latin theologians tend to focus on the punitive aspects of hell (fire and brimstone). Eastern theologians tend to focus on the dark and empty nature of hell - deprived of the presence of God. I am not aware that either belief has been considered formal doctrine of either Communion.

There are also minor differences in practice (apart from belief). In the Latin Rite, children are not usually admitted to Holy Communion until they have reached the age of reason (currently about eight years of age in Western countries). In the East, children are admitted to Holy Communion upon Baptism - even as infants (they receive the Body and Blood in a manner in which the Host is dissolved into the Precious Blood (a type of intinction) and administered via a very small spoon).

These differences in both belief and practice are in no way contradictory. It does not matter whether if the bread and wine become the Body and Blood at this particular sentence, or that particular (immediately following) sentence. By the time anyone (including the celebrant) receives Eucharist, it is fully valid under either opinion. If a marriage is conducted according to the prescriptions of either Latin or Eastern Rites, it would be fully valid under all Rites.

There are no differences in which Latin or Eastern beliefs would ultimately render each other contradictory, where Sacramental validity would be called into question.
That's not true.
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  #4  
Old May 20, '12, 12:59 am
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Default Re: Different rites of the Catholic Church

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Originally Posted by Caspar View Post
That's not true.
What's not true?
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Old May 20, '12, 9:15 am
Hesychios Hesychios is offline
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Smile Re: Different rites of the Catholic Church

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Originally Posted by Godislove4ever View Post
What are the different rites of the catholic church? do their views differ from the "mainstream" latin rite?
The Latin rite is not mainstream. There is no mainstream.
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  #6  
Old May 20, '12, 9:32 am
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Default Re: Different rites of the Catholic Church

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Originally Posted by Hesychios View Post
The Latin rite is not mainstream. There is no mainstream.
I think by "mainstream" he meant most common, not the opposite of deviant. That's how I took it, at least.
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  #7  
Old May 20, '12, 10:43 am
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Default Re: Different rites of the Catholic Church

Most people are not aware that the "Catholic Church" is actually comprised of *twenty-three* self-governing Catholic Churches, all in *union* with the pope. The Western, or Latin Catholic Church, is so large, however, that many people, even Catholics, are completely unaware of the other twenty-two churches, which make up the Eastern Branch. (Some have from only a few thousand members to a few million.)

Originally, there was only one denomination... the Catholic Church (the word Catholic meaning "universal"). However, there were five cities that early on were singled out as being important centers of Christianity. They were Jerusalem, Antioch, Alexandria, Constantinople, and of course, Rome. Each developed its own unique traditions and liturgy, but ALL shared a common theology and were in communion with each other and the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope. However, about 1000 years ago, due to a variety of unfortunate problems, the other four cities, allied with the Byzantine Empire, mutually broke off from Rome, forming the various Eastern Orthodox Churches. Although doctrinally, they are virtually identical to Catholics, they refuse to acknowledge that the pope is more than a "first among equals". (A couple groups broke of much earlier in the 400s AD also, to form what are known as the Oriental Orthodox Churches).

What has happened is that over time, some portions of each of the various Orthodox groups have decided to reconcile with the Catholic Church and come back into communion with Rome. When they do, they are allowed to keep all of their traditions and much of their independence, although they acknowledge the authority of the Pope. They become *truly* Catholic, in that anyone from ANY branch of the Catholic Church can participate in the liturgy and ceremonies of any OTHER branch of the Catholic Church. The only two Eastern groups that never fell out of communion with the Catholic Church were the Maronite Catholic Church, and the Italo-Albanian Catholic Church. So... for every branch of the Orthodox Churches that are NOT in communion with Rome, there is a corresponding and virtually identical branch of the Eastern Catholic Church that IS in communion with Rome. Since their customs and liturgies date from before the Council of Trent, they are allowed to remain.

The following liturgies are used by the Eastern Catholic Churches:
- The Liturgy of St. Basil
- The Chaldean Mass
- The Order of the Divine and Holy Liturgy of Our Father Among the Saints Gregory the Theologian (or Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts)
- The Liturgy of St. James
- The Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom
- The Liturgy of St. Mark
- The Holy Qorbono
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  #8  
Old May 20, '12, 10:44 am
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Default Re: Different rites of the Catholic Church

Here is a listing that includes EACH of the twenty-three Catholic Churches in union with the Pope. Do not confuse "churches" with "rites". A rite is a series of traditions, that includes different customs and liturgies. Several different churches may use the exact same rite. A Church has its own rules and separate line of authority to the Pope. It may also have a figure in charge, like a Metropolitan or a Patriarch (like an Archbishop), since these churches are generally very small and work very hard to preserve their unique traditions. The major *rites* are the Latin, Alexandrian, Antiochian, Armenian, Chaldean, and Byzantine.

The Western (Latin) Catholic Church

Latin liturgical tradition

1) Ordinary Form (This is the form of the Mass that you will find in virtually every Latin Catholic Church almost every day of the week. This Mass has existed since the mid-1960s, ever since reforms were made following the Second Vatican Council.)
2) Extraordinary Form (This is the form of the Mass that was used in virtually every Latin Catholic Church from the Middle Ages until the mid-1960s. It may still be said in Catholic Churches should a priest choose to use it. Some of the differences from the Ordinary Form include the exclusive use of the Latin language (except for the homily), the receipt of Communion exclusively on the tongue and kneeling, the priest facing the same direction as the people (toward the altar and God) so he can lead the people in prayer, no lay participation on the altar, and usually, no responses by lay people.)
3) Ambrosian Rite (Only permitted in the Archdiocese of Milan)
4) Mozarabic Rite (Only permitted in the Cathedral of Toledo, Spain and a few surrounding churches of the diocese)
5) Bragan Rite (Only permitted in the Archdiocese of Braga, Portugal)
6) Anglican-Use Mass (This form was once only permitted in the extremely rare circumstance in which an Anglican priest converted to Catholicism and brings his entire parish with him. In that event, a parish could continue to use the Anglican liturgy, with corrections to make it conform with Catholic teachings. It was originally meant as a transitional liturgy, and upon the death of the pastor, the church would revert to the Ordinary Form. With the recent provisions announced by the Vatican to allow Anglicans into the Catholic Church and keep their traditions, it seems that the Anglican-Use will now become both far more widespread AND permanent.)

Rites of Religious Orders
1) Dominican Rite
2) Carthusian Rite
3) Carmelite Rite
4) Cisternian Rite

Note: Technically, the forms of the Latin liturgy listed above are NOT different rites, but variations of the SAME rite, although people do tend to commonly use the term somewhat erroneously in this context. The differences between the Latin "rites" are FAR less than those between the Latin liturgy and any of the Eastern Rites.)

The Eastern Catholic Churches

1. Alexandrian liturgical tradition
1. Coptic Catholic Church (patriarchate): Egypt (1741)
2. Ethiopian Catholic Church (metropolia): Ethiopia, Eritrea (1846)
2. Antiochian (Antiochene or West-Syrian) liturgical tradition
1. Maronite Church (patriarchate): Lebanon, Cyprus, Jordan, Israel, Palestine, Egypt, Syria, Argentina, Brazil, United States, Australia, Canada, Mexico (union re-affirmed 1182)
2. Syriac Catholic Church (patriarchate): Lebanon, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Palestine, Egypt, Sudan, Syria, Turkey, United States and Canada, Venezuela (1781)
3. Syro-Malankara Catholic Church (major archiepiscopate): India, United States (1930)
3. Armenian liturgical tradition:
1. Armenian Catholic Church (patriarchate): Lebanon, Iran, Iraq, Egypt, Syria, Turkey, Jordan, Palestine, Ukraine, France, Greece, Latin America, Argentina, Romania, United States, Canada, Eastern Europe (1742)
4. Chaldean or East Syrian liturgical tradition:
1. Chaldean Catholic Church (patriarchate): Iraq, Iran, Lebanon, Egypt, Syria, Turkey, United States (1692)
2. Syro-Malabar Church (major archiepiscopate): India, Middle East, Europe and America.
5. Byzantine (Constantinopolitan) liturgical tradition:
1. Albanian Greek Catholic Church (apostolic administration): Albania (1628)
2. Belarusian Greek Catholic Church (no established hierarchy at present): Belarus (1596)
3. Bulgarian Greek Catholic Church (apostolic exarchate): Bulgaria (1861)
4. Byzantine Church of the Eparchy of Križevci (an eparchy and an apostolic exarchate): Croatia, Serbia and Montenegro (1611)
5. Greek Byzantine Catholic Church (two apostolic exarchates): Greece, Turkey (1829)
6. Hungarian Greek Catholic Church (an eparchy and an apostolic exarchate): Hungary (1646)
7. Italo-Albanian Catholic Church (two eparchies and a territorial abbacy): Italy (Never separated)
8. Macedonian Greek Catholic Church (an apostolic exarchate): Republic of Macedonia (1918)
9. Melkite Greek Catholic Church (patriarchate): Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, Jerusalem, Brazil, United States, Canada, Mexico, Iraq, Egypt and Sudan, Kuwait, Australia, Venezuela, Argentina (1726)
10. Romanian Church United with Rome, Greek-Catholic (major archiepiscopate): Romania, United States (1697)
11. Russian Catholic Church: (two apostolic exarchates, at present with no published hierarchs): Russia, China (1905); currently about 20 parishes and communities scattered around the world, including five in Russia itself, answering to bishops of other jurisdictions
12. Ruthenian Catholic Church (a sui juris metropolia, an eparchy, and an apostolic exarchate): United States, Ukraine, Czech Republic (1646)
13. Slovak Greek Catholic Church (metropolia): Slovak Republic, Canada (1646)
14. Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church (major archiepiscopate): Ukraine, Poland, United States, Canada, Great Britain, Australia, Germany and Scandinavia, France, Brazil, Argentina (1595)
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  #9  
Old May 20, '12, 3:36 pm
ConstantineTG ConstantineTG is offline
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Default Re: Different rites of the Catholic Church

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Originally Posted by Hesychios View Post
The Latin rite is not mainstream. There is no mainstream.
Technically there isn't. But does seem that way, doesn't it?
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Old May 20, '12, 5:15 pm
Hesychios Hesychios is offline
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Originally Posted by ConstantineTG View Post
Technically there isn't. But does seem that way, doesn't it?
People could be forgiven for being mistaken on the point. After all, the way things have been going one would never know ...
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Old May 20, '12, 11:46 pm
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Question Branches of Catholicism

*(I had no idea where to put this thread. So I just put it here. It may need to be moved, though!)* Of course there is the Roman Catholic Church. But what are the different Churches that are still considered Catholic? There is Orthodox, I know. Is the "Eastern Church" and the "Orthodox Church" the same Church? And what about the Church of England? I'm confused about whether these Churches are still considered Catholic or not. And they major differences between them. I am definitely a Christian, but I'm learning more about Christianity and I want to learn more about Catholicism. I've been raised, saved, and baptized Protestant, but I believe the Roman Catholic Church is the one true church started by Jesus Christ, but I still need to learn more. I really appreciate your replies and explanations! Thank you and God bless!
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Old May 21, '12, 12:27 am
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Default Re: Branches of Catholicism

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Originally Posted by komeeks18 View Post
*(I had no idea where to put this thread. So I just put it here. It may need to be moved, though!)* Of course there is the Roman Catholic Church. But what are the different Churches that are still considered Catholic? There is Orthodox, I know. Is the "Eastern Church" and the "Orthodox Church" the same Church? And what about the Church of England? I'm confused about whether these Churches are still considered Catholic or not. And they major differences between them. I am definitely a Christian, but I'm learning more about Christianity and I want to learn more about Catholicism. I've been raised, saved, and baptized Protestant, but I believe the Roman Catholic Church is the one true church started by Jesus Christ, but I still need to learn more. I really appreciate your replies and explanations! Thank you and God bless!
The Catholic Church is made up of, if I'm not mistaken, 23 sui juris (meaning: self-governing) Churches with equal dignity. One of which is the Latin Rite Church or more famously known as the Roman Catholic Church.

The other 22 sui juris churches are Easter Rite churches which are similar, if not identical, to the Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Churches. The only difference is that the Eastern Churches (or Eastern Catholic Churches) are in full communion with the Pope.

The Church of England is a break-away from the Latin Rite Church, since England at the time of King Henry VI was part of the Roman Church. So Anglicans who come home to Catholicism are generally under the Roman Church.

Just remember: The Latin Rite or Roman Church is not the primary or the supreme Church, rather she is co-equal in dignity with the other sui juris Churches. It just so happens, the seat of Peter is in Rome.
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Old May 21, '12, 12:36 am
ConstantineTG ConstantineTG is offline
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Default Re: Branches of Catholicism

It is not right to call us branches. We see ourselves more as separate plants in the garden of God, rather than a branch from one tree. This is because we have distinct traditions that develop separately.
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Old May 21, '12, 12:43 am
komeeks18 komeeks18 is offline
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Default Re: Branches of Catholicism

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Originally Posted by choliks View Post
The Catholic Church is made up of, if I'm not mistaken, 23 sui juris (meaning: self-governing) Churches with equal dignity. One of which is the Latin Rite Church or more famously known as the Roman Catholic Church.

The other 22 sui juris churches are Easter Rite churches which are similar, if not identical, to the Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Churches. The only difference is that the Eastern Churches (or Eastern Catholic Churches) are in full communion with the Pope.

The Church of England is a break-away from the Latin Rite Church, since England at the time of King Henry VI was part of the Roman Church. So Anglicans who come home to Catholicism are generally under the Roman Church.

Just remember: The Latin Rite or Roman Church is not the primary or the supreme Church, rather she is co-equal in dignity with the other sui juris Churches. It just so happens, the seat of Peter is in Rome.
So the Catholic Church is made up of many self-governing Churches that have differences and beliefs, but are still considered Catholic? And the Eastern Orthodox Church, are they also led by the Pope? Sorry, this is very difficult for me to understand the differences and division but the unity.
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Old May 21, '12, 12:47 am
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Default Re: Branches of Catholicism

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Originally Posted by komeeks18 View Post
So the Catholic Church is made up of many self-governing Churches that have differences and beliefs, but are still considered Catholic? And the Eastern Orthodox Church, are they also led by the Pope? Sorry, this is very difficult for me to understand the differences and division but the unity.
Not really a difference in beliefs. More like a difference in traditions (as ConstantinTG pointed out). In terms of theology: we are of the same theology but expressed differently. What makes us all Catholic is our communion with the Pope. The Pope is the our point of unity.

With the Eastern Orthodox... they are autonomous. They are sui juris (self governed) but not in full communion with the Pope. However, to confuse you some more, the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria has its own Pope.
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