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  #1  
Old Sep 18, '05, 4:15 pm
contemplative contemplative is offline
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Default Pope Benedict and Lectio Divina

Pope Benedict and Lectio Divina
In an address to a congress of Biblical scholars meeting in Rome to discuss "Sacred Scripture in the Life of the Church," the Holy Father recommended the monastic practice of lectio divina, the prayerful, meditative reading of the Bible. "Assiduous reading of sacred Scripture accompanied by prayer makes that intimate dialogue possible in which, through reading, one hears God speaking, and through prayer, one responds with a confident opening of the heart," the Pope said (
zenit.org).
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  #2  
Old Sep 20, '05, 1:14 pm
proud2bcatholic proud2bcatholic is offline
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Default Re: Pope Benedict and Lectio Divina

For those who do not know what Lectio Divina is:


http://www.salvationhistory.com/libr...yer/lectio.cfm
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  #3  
Old Sep 20, '05, 1:33 pm
E.E.N.S. E.E.N.S. is offline
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Default Re: Pope Benedict and Lectio Divina

This is a good supplement site as well...


http://www.osb.org/lectio/
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  #4  
Old Sep 20, '05, 1:38 pm
YinYangMom YinYangMom is offline
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Default Re: Pope Benedict and Lectio Divina

Question:

Is he talking about the priests, deacons, bishops, cardinals, orders engaging in LD more often

or is he asking all members, including us little ones, to do so?

I mean, considering the audience hearing this particular passage I would be inclined to think he's calling all those who have consecrated themselves to the Church to follow the practice of LD.

But since he hasn't written a letter to the bishops to encourage their faithful to pick up the practice, I'd be inclined to believe it is not intended for me and my children.

I can't really tell.
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  #5  
Old Sep 20, '05, 1:40 pm
proud2bcatholic proud2bcatholic is offline
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Default Re: Pope Benedict and Lectio Divina

I would guess that he is asking all of us, given the Vatican II universal call to holiness, and the Pope's determination to truly implement the Vatican II documents, I would guess that he is telling the universal Church that this is one way to realize our call to holiness.
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  #6  
Old Sep 20, '05, 1:42 pm
proud2bcatholic proud2bcatholic is offline
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Default Re: Pope Benedict and Lectio Divina

Here is the full article

Code: ZE05091608

Date: 2005-09-16

Benedict XVI Promotes Biblical Meditation

Ancient Practice Could Bring Renewal to Church

CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy, SEPT. 16, 2005 (Zenit.org).- Benedict XVI believes that the recovery of the practice of "lectio divina," prayerful meditation of Scripture, will bring a "new spiritual springtime" for the Church.

When meeting today with more than 400 experts attending a congress in Rome on "Sacred Scripture in the Life of the Church," the Holy Father recommended this ancient practice which literally means "divine reading."

"Assiduous reading of sacred Scripture accompanied by prayer makes that intimate dialogue possible in which, through reading, one hears God speaking, and through prayer, one responds with a confident opening of the heart," the Pope said.

Over the past 40 years, this proposal has received attention throughout the Church after the publication of the Second Vatican Council's dogmatic constitution on divine Revelation, "Dei Verbum."

"If this practice is promoted with efficacy, I am convinced that it will produce a new spiritual springtime in the Church," stated the Holy Father.

To promote "lectio divina," Benedict XVI suggested "new methods, attentively pondered, adapted to the times."

"One must never forget that the Word of God is a lamp for our steps and a light on our path," he said.

The first to use the expression "lectio divina" was Origen (circa 185-254), who affirmed that to read the Bible profitably it is necessary to do so with attention, constancy and prayer.

Later on, "lectio divina" became a mainstay of religious life. The monastic rules of Sts. Pacomius, Augustine, Basil and Benedict made the practice of diving reading, together with manual work and participation in liturgical life, the triple base of monastic life.

The systematization of "lectio divina" in four steps dates back to the 12th century, explained the Holy Father.

Around 1150, Guido, a Carthusian monk, wrote a book entitled "The Monks' Ladder," where "he set out the theory of the four rungs: reading, meditation, prayer and contemplation," according to the Pope. "This is the ladder by which the monks ascend from earth to heaven."

http://www.zenit.org/english/visualizza.phtml?sid=76678
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  #7  
Old Sep 20, '05, 1:58 pm
YinYangMom YinYangMom is offline
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Default Re: Pope Benedict and Lectio Divina

Quote:
Originally Posted by proud2bcatholic
Here is the full article

Code: ZE05091608

Date: 2005-09-16

Benedict XVI Promotes Biblical Meditation

Ancient Practice Could Bring Renewal to Church

CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy, SEPT. 16, 2005 (Zenit.org).- Benedict XVI believes that the recovery of the practice of "lectio divina," prayerful meditation of Scripture, will bring a "new spiritual springtime" for the Church.

When meeting today with more than 400 experts attending a congress in Rome on "Sacred Scripture in the Life of the Church," the Holy Father recommended this ancient practice which literally means "divine reading."

"Assiduous reading of sacred Scripture accompanied by prayer makes that intimate dialogue possible in which, through reading, one hears God speaking, and through prayer, one responds with a confident opening of the heart," the Pope said.

Over the past 40 years, this proposal has received attention throughout the Church after the publication of the Second Vatican Council's dogmatic constitution on divine Revelation, "Dei Verbum."

"If this practice is promoted with efficacy, I am convinced that it will produce a new spiritual springtime in the Church," stated the Holy Father.

To promote "lectio divina," Benedict XVI suggested "new methods, attentively pondered, adapted to the times."

"One must never forget that the Word of God is a lamp for our steps and a light on our path," he said.

The first to use the expression "lectio divina" was Origen (circa 185-254), who affirmed that to read the Bible profitably it is necessary to do so with attention, constancy and prayer.

Later on, "lectio divina" became a mainstay of religious life. The monastic rules of Sts. Pacomius, Augustine, Basil and Benedict made the practice of diving reading, together with manual work and participation in liturgical life, the triple base of monastic life.

The systematization of "lectio divina" in four steps dates back to the 12th century, explained the Holy Father.

Around 1150, Guido, a Carthusian monk, wrote a book entitled "The Monks' Ladder," where "he set out the theory of the four rungs: reading, meditation, prayer and contemplation," according to the Pope. "This is the ladder by which the monks ascend from earth to heaven."

http://www.zenit.org/english/visualizza.phtml?sid=76678
Right....so is this really more about them and those like them, than for people like you and me?
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  #8  
Old Sep 20, '05, 5:42 pm
BonnieBj BonnieBj is offline
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Default Re: Pope Benedict and Lectio Divina

Many clergy adn religious already do this as part of their vows, reading the Liturgy of hte Hours, etc. As a Benedictine Oblate (final Oblation upcoming on 10/15) we are required to do this for both Scripture and the Rule of Benedict. Before anybody moves too fast on this, this will have to be taught and with the quality of so many of the religious education programs it is doubltful that anybody will be willing or able to do so. You have to find an instructor who knows how to do it and can teeach it as well. I have been trying for the better part of a year to learn it with no success and I have been reading the Bible since I left the Catholic Church in the late 70s (I came back last year). I have had no success at all, I hear nothing, I get few thoughts on the subject I've been reading. So I am buying a book that was recommended by many on the thread "Comtem plative" started on the subject and I'm also going to seek out a spiritual advisor to work with me on this.

But regular Bible reading, at the very least should definitely be encouraged and practiced. Most Catho9lics don't know their Zephaniah from their Zechariah, and I wonder how many of them have even read the Gospels comletely. True lectio is diffuclt and most people wouldn't be able to stick it out long enough to get into the full process.
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Old Sep 21, '05, 6:31 am
wjohnson wjohnson is offline
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Default Re: Pope Benedict and Lectio Divina

Quote:
Originally Posted by proud2bcatholic

Code: ZE05091608

Date: 2005-09-16

Benedict XVI Promotes Biblical Meditation

Ancient Practice Could Bring Renewal to Church

CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy, SEPT. 16, 2005 (Zenit.org).- Benedict XVI believes that the recovery of the practice of "lectio divina," prayerful meditation of Scripture, will bring a "new spiritual springtime" for the Church.
I believe he meant all of the church.
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  #10  
Old Sep 21, '05, 7:45 am
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Default Re: Pope Benedict and Lectio Divina

Quote:
Originally Posted by BonnieBj
Before anybody moves too fast on this, this will have to be taught and with the quality of so many of the religious education programs it is doubltful that anybody will be willing or able to do so. You have to find an instructor who knows how to do it and can teeach it as well. I have been trying for the better part of a year to learn it with no success and I have been reading the Bible since I left the Catholic Church in the late 70s (I came back last year). I have had no success at all, I hear nothing, I get few thoughts on the subject I've been reading. .
part of your Oblate Formation should be instruction and support in lectio for both small group and individual prayer. If your instruction was not enough, please ask for more. You should be meeting also regularly in a deanery with experienced oblates, ask to spend some time in lectio with the group, or arrange to meet regularly to pray LOTH and lectio together, if you live close enough.

As far as having no success, I don't know what your definition of success is. To begin with, establishing the discipline of setting aside a regular time each day for prayer and reading (which the Holy Rule guides us to do) is a major, major success. An emotional feeling, a bolt of lightening, a feeling that the verses were aimed directly at you, and "aha" moment, are not required as evidence that lectio is "working". the "Word" you hear or discern may be very subtle, very inconsequential, and not announce itself dramatically, but if you get in the habit of jotting in a journal kept exclusively for this purpose (no reflections, no meditations arising from your own mind, only the scripture verses) one word or phrase or verse that stands out for you, no matter how quietly or subtly, it will start to "happen" for you.

A mistake beginners often make is reading too long a passage, and not preparing the passage beforehand, and not allowing time before beginning to establish a place and mood of recollection. If you are reading the day's gospel, for instance: if it is real long, take it in sections. Read the whole passage first from your bible, not missal, check out the footnotes, or look up anything in a good reference book that is puzzling or distracting (how much was a day's wage for vineyard workers?, where was the pool of siloam? etc.). Read it again. Only THEN do you begin the slow reading for lectio.

Another mistake beginners make is rushing the process, or alternatively going on too long. About 10 minutes of preparation, 10-20 minutes of the slow reading, starting and stopping, 5 minutes of prayer and some time in silent contemplation are enough to start with. You don't want to exhaust your spiritual muscles as you begin this exercise.

Don't judge success by dramatic results, judge success by how faithful you are in keeping your appointment with God in this way.
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  #11  
Old Nov 15, '11, 7:58 pm
muoidat muoidat is offline
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Default Re: Pope Benedict and Lectio Divina

Quote:
Originally Posted by BonnieBj View Post
Many clergy adn religious already do this as part of their vows, reading the Liturgy of hte Hours, etc. As a Benedictine Oblate (final Oblation upcoming on 10/15) we are required to do this for both Scripture and the Rule of Benedict. Before anybody moves too fast on this, this will have to be taught and with the quality of so many of the religious education programs it is doubltful that anybody will be willing or able to do so. You have to find an instructor who knows how to do it and can teeach it as well. I have been trying for the better part of a year to learn it with no success and I have been reading the Bible since I left the Catholic Church in the late 70s (I came back last year). I have had no success at all, I hear nothing, I get few thoughts on the subject I've been reading. So I am buying a book that was recommended by many on the thread "Comtem plative" started on the subject and I'm also going to seek out a spiritual advisor to work with me on this.

But regular Bible reading, at the very least should definitely be encouraged and practiced. Most Catho9lics don't know their Zephaniah from their Zechariah, and I wonder how many of them have even read the Gospels comletely. True lectio is diffuclt and most people wouldn't be able to stick it out long enough to get into the full process.
What may also help is not to view Lectio Divina as a destination, but view it as a journey. Another disposition that may help when doing Lectio Divina is "to be" and not "to do". We are being invited "to be" with Christ. We don't need "to do" or "to go" anywhere, since He is already present with us. So even in moment where we don't seem to be "successful" (as you put it), Maybe there is an invitation to let go of our own desire/wants and embrace God's desire.

I am only trying to share my own journey with Lectio Divina. I hope you can benefit from it. God bless.
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  #12  
Old Nov 16, '11, 7:17 am
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Default Re: Pope Benedict and Lectio Divina

It is important to note that it predates "monastic practice" though certainly it is also a monastic practice and monasticism has contributed much to the practice (i.e. Guigo II the Carthusian et al).

Pope Benedict XVI is certainly encouraging all to this way of life (lectio divina).
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Old Nov 16, '11, 7:19 am
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Default Re: Pope Benedict and Lectio Divina

"The prayerful reading of sacred Scripture and “lectio divina”

The Synod frequently insisted on the need for a prayerful approach to the sacred text as a fundamental element in the spiritual life of every believer, in the various ministries and states in life, with particular reference to lectio divina.[290] The word of God is at the basis of all authentic Christian spirituality. The Synod Fathers thus took up the words of the Dogmatic Constitution Dei Verbum: “Let the faithful go gladly to the sacred text itself, whether in the sacred liturgy, which is full of the divine words, or in devout reading, or in such suitable exercises and various other helps which, with the approval and guidance of the pastors of the Church, are happily spreading everywhere in our day. Let them remember, however, that prayer should accompany the reading of sacred Scripture”.[291] The Council thus sought to reappropriate the great patristic tradition which had always recommended approaching the Scripture in dialogue with God. As Saint Augustine puts it: “Your prayer is the word you speak to God. When you read the Bible, God speaks to you; when you pray, you speak to God”.[292] Origen, one of the great masters of this way of reading the Bible, maintains that understanding Scripture demands, even more than study, closeness to Christ and prayer. Origen was convinced, in fact, that the best way to know God is through love, and that there can be no authentic scientia Christi apart from growth in his love. In his Letter to Gregory, the great Alexandrian theologian gave this advice: “Devote yourself to the lectio of the divine Scriptures; apply yourself to this with perseverance. Do your reading with the intent of believing in and pleasing God. If during the lectio you encounter a closed door, knock and it will be opened to you by that guardian of whom Jesus said, ‘The gatekeeper will open it for him’. By applying yourself in this way to lectio divina, search diligently and with unshakable trust in God for the meaning of the divine Scriptures, which is hidden in great fullness within. You ought not, however, to be satisfied merely with knocking and seeking: to understand the things of God, what is absolutely necessary is oratio. For this reason, the Saviour told us not only: ‘Seek and you will find’, and ‘Knock and it shall be opened to you’, but also added, ‘Ask and you shall receive’”.[293]

In this regard, however, one must avoid the risk of an individualistic approach, and remember that God’s word is given to us precisely to build communion, to unite us in the Truth along our path to God. While it is a word addressed to each of us personally, it is also a word which builds community, which builds the Church. Consequently, the sacred text must always be approached in the communion of the Church. In effect, “a communal reading of Scripture is extremely important, because the living subject in the sacred Scriptures is the People of God, it is the Church… Scripture does not belong to the past, because its subject, the People of God inspired by God himself, is always the same, and therefore the word is always alive in the living subject. As such, it is important to read and experience sacred Scripture in communion with the Church, that is, with all the great witnesses to this word, beginning with the earliest Fathers up to the saints of our own day, up to the present-day magisterium”.[294]

For this reason, the privileged place for the prayerful reading of sacred Scripture is the liturgy, and particularly the Eucharist, in which, as we celebrate the Body and Blood of Christ in the sacrament, the word itself is present and at work in our midst. In some sense the prayerful reading of the Bible, personal and communal, must always be related to the Eucharistic celebration. Just as the adoration of the Eucharist prepares for, accompanies and follows the liturgy of the Eucharist,[295] so too prayerful reading, personal and communal, prepares for, accompanies and deepens what the Church celebrates when she proclaims the word in a liturgical setting. By so closely relating lectio and liturgy, we can better grasp the criteria which should guide this practice in the area of pastoral care and in the spiritual life of the People of God."--

continued...
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Old Nov 16, '11, 7:20 am
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Default Re: Pope Benedict and Lectio Divina

The documents produced before and during the Synod mentioned a number of methods for a faith-filled and fruitful approach to sacred Scripture. Yet the greatest attention was paid to lectio divina, which is truly “capable of opening up to the faithful the treasures of God’s word, but also of bringing about an encounter with Christ, the living word of God”.[296] I would like here to review the basic steps of this procedure. It opens with the reading (lectio) of a text, which leads to a desire to understand its true content: what does the biblical text say in itself? Without this, there is always a risk that the text will become a pretext for never moving beyond our own ideas. Next comes meditation (meditatio), which asks: what does the biblical text say to us? Here, each person, individually but also as a member of the community, must let himself or herself be moved and challenged. Following this comes prayer (oratio), which asks the question: what do we say to the Lord in response to his word? Prayer, as petition, intercession, thanksgiving and praise, is the primary way by which the word transforms us. Finally, lectio divina concludes with contemplation (contemplatio), during which we take up, as a gift from God, his own way of seeing and judging reality, and ask ourselves what conversion of mind, heart and life is the Lord asking of us? In the Letter to the Romans, Saint Paul tells us: “Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that you may prove what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect” (12:2). Contemplation aims at creating within us a truly wise and discerning vision of reality, as God sees it, and at forming within us “the mind of Christ” (1 Cor 2:16). The word of God appears here as a criterion for discernment: it is “living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing to the division of soul and spirit, of joints and marrow, and discerning the thoughts and intentions of the heart” (Heb 4:12). We do well also to remember that the process of lectio divina is not concluded until it arrives at action (actio), which moves the believer to make his or her life a gift for others in charity.

We find the supreme synthesis and fulfilment of this process in the Mother of God. For every member of the faithful Mary is the model of docile acceptance of God’s word, for she “kept all these things, pondering them in her heart” (Lk 2:19; cf. 2:51); she discovered the profound bond which unites, in God’s great plan, apparently disparate events, actions and things.[297]

I would also like to echo what the Synod proposed about the importance of the personal reading of Scripture, also as a practice allowing for the possibility, in accordance with the Church’s usual conditions, of gaining an indulgence either for oneself or for the faithful departed.[298] The practice of indulgences[299] implies the doctrine of the infinite merits of Christ – which the Church, as the minister of the redemption, dispenses and applies, but it also implies that of the communion of saints, and it teaches us that “to whatever degree we are united in Christ, we are united to one another, and the supernatural life of each one can be useful for the others”.[300] From this standpoint, the reading of the word of God sustains us on our journey of penance and conversion, enables us to deepen our sense of belonging to the Church, and helps us to grow in familiarity with God. As Saint Ambrose puts it, “When we take up the sacred Scriptures in faith and read them with the Church, we walk once more with God in the Garden”.[301]"

~Pope Benedict XVI

Verbum Domini

(more throughout this document ...a must read)

http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/be...God_Who_Speaks
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Old Nov 16, '11, 7:21 am
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Default Re: Pope Benedict and Lectio Divina

Some more Quotes from Pope Benedict XVI on Lectio Divina

“Note what Saint Jerome said in this regard: "Ignorance of the Scriptures is ignorance of Christ" (PL 24,17; cf Dei Verbum, 25). A time-honoured way to study and savour the word of God is lectio divina which constitutes a real and veritable spiritual journey marked out in stages. After the lectio, which consists of reading and rereading a passage from Sacred Scripture and taking in the main elements, we proceed to meditatio. This is a moment of interior reflection in which the soul turns to God and tries to understand what his word is saying to us today. Then comes oratio in which we linger to talk with God directly. Finally we come to contemplatio. This helps us to keep our hearts attentive to the presence of Christ whose word is "a lamp shining in a dark place, until the day dawns and the morning star rises in your hearts" (2 Pet 1:19). Reading, study and meditation of the Word should then flow into a life of consistent fidelity to Christ and his teachings.”
(Message to the Youth of World Youth Day 9 April 2006)

“Among the many fruits of this biblical springtime I would like to mention the spread of the ancient practice of Lectio divina or "spiritual reading" of Sacred Scripture. It consists in pouring over a biblical text for some time, reading it and rereading it, as it were, "ruminating" on it as the Fathers say and squeezing from it, so to speak, all its "juice", so that it may nourish meditation and contemplation and, like water, succeed in irrigating life itself.

One condition for Lectio divina is that the mind and heart be illumined by the Holy Spirit, that is, by the same Spirit who inspired the Scriptures, and that they be approached with an attitude of "reverential hearing".” Angelus Nov 6 2005
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