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  #1  
Old Jan 4, '06, 9:54 pm
Agricola Agricola is offline
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Default What are the benefits of a Catholic education?

For those who have received a Catholic education, what do you think the greatest benefits of that education are... as opposed to a secular education.

Catholic/homeschool/seminary/Catholic college or university versus public institutions and secular private institutions.

God bless,


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  #2  
Old Jan 4, '06, 10:15 pm
pira114 pira114 is offline
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Default Re: What are the benefits of a Catholic education?

I went to Catholic school from 1st to 8th grade. Then went to public school for high school, then on to the university of MCRD in San Diego.

I can tell you that the private education at the time was much different than public. I didn't know anything about science until I went to public school. Also, the class was Much smaller. We had no need for lockers or mulitple classrooms/teachers. It was a huge culture shock when I went to high school.

As for the remainder of the education, it was fine. Math, English, typing, most of Social Studies, was much better than public school. Science was almost non-existent, and Social Studies was as biased as you can get. Which I don't mind as I happen to agree with the points of view expressed. Public schools tend to be biased toward the opposite opinion anyway.

By far the best thing I got out of it (and the 2nd biggest reason my kids are going to Catholic school) is the feeling of family. The feeling of belonging to a real community within a community. You tend to know a lot of the parents when you go to a Catholic school. You tend to have to be really involved, especially nowadays. You really feel like people care about you. When I went to public school, there were teachers who obviously cared, but the over all feeling was that you really didn't matter.
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  #3  
Old Jan 5, '06, 7:05 am
Monica37 Monica37 is offline
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Default Re: What are the benefits of a Catholic education?

I went to public schools K-9 then to Catholic school. What I didn't like about it then is what I love about it now. Then, as a teenager, I was not too keen on the principal (Sr Marion) calling my Mom to tell her who I was hanging out with, where I was planning to go that weekend, what all my friends were up to, etc.. Now, as a parent, I love the idea of having a few extra eyes on my kids. I realize now that Sr Marion was looking out for me, not just trying to spy on me. It has taken 5 yrs to convince my husband that Catholic schools are good for our children (don't think he is completely convinced yet) but I did get to place our 11 yr old daughter in Catholic school this year. It has been an adjustment for her which is why I think she needs to stay in Catholic schools until graduation (we move a lot so would have to change schools). I want her to get accustomed to one kind and not bounce back and forth between secular and Catholic. I also like the smaller classrooms. I had a math teacher in high school who met with me individually to help me pass the class. I think it is easier for the teachers to recognize and resolve issues like that if the classes are smaller. I also absolutely love Shakespere because of Sr Francesca. We got to study him more in depth because of the small class size. Anyway, I am very glad my daughter is finally in Catholic school and I plan to start and finish my son's education in them as well.
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  #4  
Old Jan 5, '06, 11:10 am
JGheen JGheen is offline
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Default Re: What are the benefits of a Catholic education?

For elementary, junior and high school - I think the primary benefit is that parents at private school children are invested in their children education. This could be because of the religious aspects or just because of the monetary commitment. Either way, this fosters academic excellence, discipline and personal integrity in students. Plus, private schools can kick out the big troublemakers/low achievers and not waste teacher attention / focus on them. Also, private school teachers are usually paid less then public school teachers, so you know they are really dedicated to teaching at their schools.

Good students with invested parents could probably do well anywhere, but it might be a bigger struggle in public schools. This is because public schools have to admit everyone and the scholastic and discipline expectations are lowered to accommodate all.

One con to private schools is that parents can forget to be aware of the religious education, or lack thereof, that their children are receiving. Parents can't simply assume that they are fulfilling their parental duty by sending their children to Catholic schools. That is a trap. You still have to personally talk to your children about moral issues and teach them religion.

Once children hit college the choice is usually in their hands. I think the primary benefit to young adults is that they are living on their own and making adult decisions for the first time - they need a safe and Catholic friendly environment to foster positive decisions. Unfortunately, most public (and some "Catholic") schools provide just the opposite.
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  #5  
Old Jan 5, '06, 12:29 pm
Chovy Chovy is offline
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Default Re: What are the benefits of a Catholic education?

This is a great post and actually, I was planning on writing a book about this topic but just haven't gotten started. The things that I valued, outside of the exceptional education in core classes are the other things that I learned:

1. In times of trouble, turn to God. When President Reagan was shot, Pope John Paul II was shot, the Challenger went down, etc..., in Catholic school, we went to church and prayed. On Sept. 11th, I was working in Manhattan, (I live in Omaha, NE) and when my coworkers were heading off to the bar, I knew just where to go, to pray.

2. Guilt is not a bad thing. In Catholic school, you are taught right from wrong. It isn't an esoteric feel good sort of morality as could be upheld by the secular schools but the real, hey-if-you-do-wrong-you-will-be-punished sort of right and wrong. If you look at society today, in my opinion, one of our great downfalls is our lack of guilt. Pregnant outside of marriage- no shame, no guilt. Divorced 4 times before you're 30, just a different lifestyle, that's all. Murder your children- it's your choice. Guilt is what can prevent many of us from doing the wrong thing. If all else fails, fear of shame or punishment works just fine to keep a person on the straight and narrow and really, guilt makes us more human.

3. Catholicism is something to be proud of and embrace. Being Catholic makes you special and different and that is something to celebrate.

I could go on and on (as I said above, I want to write a book on this) but these are the things that stand out in my mind.
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  #6  
Old Jan 7, '06, 1:32 pm
OutinChgoburbs OutinChgoburbs is offline
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Default Re: What are the benefits of a Catholic education?

A Catholic education properly develops one's thought process to consider God's way rather than Man's way. They also USUALLY provide better academics and discipline (not beating with a ruler) than public schools on a lot less money.
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  #7  
Old Jan 7, '06, 3:33 pm
BLB_Oregon BLB_Oregon is offline
 
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Default Re: What are the benefits of a Catholic education?

Catholic friends with Catholic parents who have made a sacrifice to get them a Catholic education.
In my experience, an atmosphere that is both disciplined and kind.
An atmosphere in which Catholicism and a Catholic perspective are the norm. Inappropriate secular attitudes concerning dress, lifestyle, and so on don't have to be tolerated. Catholic attitudes are assumed without apology or a feeling of defensiveness about having them.
Generally speaking, a rigorous intellectual experience that encourages full development of academic potential.
Administration can enforce rules of conduct, by expulsion, if necessary (i.e., the public schools get the bad actors, which is their bad luck, but so it goes)
Recently, the expectation that students will do service for the less fortunate as part of their Catholic formation.
Contact with committed Catholic laypeople on a daily basis. (Priests and other religious, too, if you're fortunate.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chovy
Guilt is not a bad thing. In Catholic school, you are taught right from wrong.... If you look at society today, in my opinion, one of our great downfalls is our lack of guilt. Pregnant outside of marriage- no shame, no guilt. Divorced 4 times before you're 30, just a different lifestyle, that's all. Murder your children- it's your choice. Guilt is what can prevent many of us from doing the wrong thing. If all else fails, fear of shame or punishment works just fine to keep a person on the straight and narrow and really, guilt makes us more human.
I'm not saying you're wrong, but the way you've worded this gives a slightly incorrect impression, if you know what I mean. Probably not. Let me try to explain.... and maybe this is just me.

I don't think Catholicism is so strong on guilt so much any more as it is high on expectations. By this I mean the emphasis switching from realizing you are in the gutter to realizing that you were made for better, no matter how many times you fall back in.

The difference is three-fold. First, wallowing in guilt gets you nowhere. Accepting God's forgiveness and the grace to be amended is what is wanted. Second, if you avoid sin because you fear shame and punishment, you are going to be tempted to judge those who fall into sin, desire their punishment and shame, and resent it when that doesn't come (I'm thinking of the stay-at-home brother in the story of the prodigal son). At any rate, I went to a Catholic high school over twenty years ago, and even then the emphasis wasn't on developing one's sense of shame, so much as one's sense of right and wrong. Third, since we all struggle with sin, if guilt is one's normal response to the recognition of sin, one is either going to be perpetually feeling guilty, perpetually ignoring one's own sins, or perpetually yo-yoing between the two.

So while recognition of guilt is good, going that far and no farther is bad. You didn't say otherwise, I know, I just wanted to clarify.
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  #8  
Old Jan 7, '06, 6:04 pm
mschoir01 mschoir01 is offline
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Default Re: What are the benefits of a Catholic education?

My dd, a graduate student in the study of sociology calls it the "inner locus of control". The product of a Catholic education will not be able to deny personal responsibility for their actions. The study, every day, year after year of the faith will give one a grounding in the knowledge of morals, character, and most importantly, love of God who gives us everything. My Catholic education has stood me in good stead and carried me through turbulent times (child of the 60s) and all the vicissitudes that life has for all who live long enough. Even when I strayed from the path, I always knew the way back. Catholic education is a precious gift given in love from the parents. Love of the faith keeps most Catholic educators on the job. This is a living example to the students of the importance of service in His name. Catholic education teaches us that we are called to be Christ to each other.

On the secular side, I was well prepared to enter university after Catholic high school. The emphasis on personal responsibility and the attention to the development of good study skills made the transition to higher education much easier for me than my dorm room mate. I was thought to be much smarter than I actually was simply because I had spent many years studying, knew how to write and use a library. Many thanks to the good Sisters of St. Joseph and the good Sisters of the Incarnate Word.
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  #9  
Old Jan 7, '06, 7:36 pm
kvance kvance is offline
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Default Re: What are the benefits of a Catholic education?

The best thing about a Catholic Education is the Catholic education. I attended Catholic School in grades 1 - 9 then transferred to the public high school. I have to say that I loved the public school. I loved the wide array of classes from which to choose and the mass of people from which to find friends. The thing that was interesting is that I found a group of Catholic girlfriends to whom I am close even now, twenty+ years later. The slightly depressing thing is that there were no discernable differences in the moral character of the students at the Catholic schools and those at the public schools.

Fast-forward a few years to when my husband and I were making the decision about were to send our first child to school. We chose the public school. My husband was not Catholic at the time and I was not a practicing Catholic. My husband thought we should consider Catholic school because he felt the moral character of the Catholic school students would be better. I convinced him he was wrong. Our oldest son is an upstanding Catholic young man who graduated from the public school system. We started our younger son in public school and moved him to Catholic school in third grade.

We moved him exclusively for faith-based reasons. I still feel that the moral character of the public school students/parents is as great as that of the Catholic school students/parents. I still feel that the public school can offer more in the area of academics. But between the time my older son entered school and my younger son entered school I reverted to my Catholic faith, my husband converted to Catholicism and I became a catechist in PSR. Teaching in PSR opened my eyes to the value of the religion classes and school masses and everything else that is part of being in the Catholic school. Knowing that the PSR teachers were doing the best job they could do in the limited time they had, and that it still was not enough, I felt a moral obligation to try to send my children to the Catholic school. My older son would not have done well if we had tried to transplant him to the Catholic school. The younger son we felt would flourish wherever he went to school so we moved him. It has been a mixed bag. Some things have worked very well and others have not. All in all we have been pleased with our decision. In all honesty we will probably not send him to Catholic high school. It is very hard to justify the tuition at the high school level.
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  #10  
Old Mar 20, '12, 10:09 pm
Jennysputeri Jennysputeri is offline
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Default Re: What are the benefits of a Catholic education?

Hi! I'm new here. In my country, the case of catholic school is a bit different. There are public school, Catholic or Christian School, and International school. While I wouldn't want my children to enter public school, international school is very appealing. It has smaller students per class, updated learning methods, and closer relationship between teacher and students.
In my country, the Catholic school usually has 40 students in each class, compares to 25 students in international school. The curiculu, is also bery traditional, one way teaching. My niece goes to the most favourite Catholic school. She has to remember all the School rules since the class is having a test about them! She has to sit still in class, and has bery little chance to ask about the subjects, or discuss it with her friends. I don't think this is the ideal way of learning. True that the Catholic school in my country has more disipline, but in terms of teaching, gosh.... It's terrible.
I amcirrently looking for an elementary school for my daughter. She is almost 4, but I have alteady visited a lot of them. International school has advantage because of its method. Most of them are using active learning, or IB. The most important drawback is, the encironment is not good. The students are all come from middle upper income family (since the school fee is very expensive), and some of them are involved in drugs and premarital sex.
What would you do if you were me? Putting my child in Catholic school or International school?
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