1955 vs.1962

What are the differences between the 1955 and 1962 missals? Do they have a different calendar. If so, which saints feasts days were changed, replaced, or abolished. I have a 1962 missal…would it work at a 1955 mass? Which one do most traditionalists prefer?

My “little” Missal which I got for my first communion in 1957 is not any different from my “big” Missal which I got when I was confirmed in 1963. The differences in holy days/saint’s feasts days came after Vatican II.

I will have to look at my mother’s Missal some time. I believe she has the 1955 one. I have a 1962 Missal. I’ll go through the ordinary of the Mass and see what differences there are.

This is not all that comprehensive, and it deals with the Mass from 1956 (after the changes of Pius XII)

The differences are:

Ranks are changed. 1955 is Double I Class, Double II Class, Greater Double, double, Simple, commemoration. 1962 is I Class, II Class, III Class, IV Class (for feriae), Commemoration. Along with this, many feasts lose the right to be transferred, and Sundays take precedence over more feasts.

The following feasts are omitted from the 1962 books: Finding of Holy Cross, St. John before the Latin gate, Apparition of St. Michael, St. Peter’s Chains, Finding of St. Stephen, Chair of St. Peter at Antioch . Also St. Anacletus is only celebrated under the name St. Cletus (April 26), and St. Vitalis is only celebrated under the name which appears together with St. Agricola (Nov. 26).

The Mass of the Rogations is linked with the procession.

For the Ember days, outside conventual and ordination Masses, one can only say the first collect/lesson and the second collet, and omit all the other lessons and collects.

The rules governing the saying of the Creed and the number of collects are stricter in 1962. 1956 restricted the number of collects to 3, 1962 does the same but limits the days.

In the 1956 rubrics there are two Proper Last Gospels (more often, only one): Christmas and Palm Sunday. The Last Gospel read on these days is not the Prologue to St. John’s. In the 1962 Missal, the concept of the Proper Last Gospel is done away with completely. Similarly, almost all Masses end with “Ite Missa Est” instead of “Benedicamus Domino” as was previously customary for certain times (like Lent). When Ite Missa Est is not said, no blessing is given.

The prayers at the foot of the altar may be omitted together with the Last Gospel on certain occasions.

The second Confiteor before communion is removed from the Rites to be Observed and the name of St. Joseph is inserted into the Canon. The rubrics are changed slightly making reference to a bell, communion paten, etc.

Among the actions of the priest, he does not have to bow towards the crucifix at the Holy Name, or the image at the saint, and he no longer needs to recite the Epistle and Gospel silently at High Mass.

Officially the priests are allowed directly by the rubrics to use incense at a Missa Cantata and at all times it is used in a Missal Solemnis.

Among the vestments, the deacon and subdeacon could wear dalmatic and tunicle at most times. Previously they would have worn folded chasubles during penitential seasons and the deacon would have also had a stolone- a broad stole.


A 1955 missal with the changes of the Holy Week would be usable at a 1962 Mass.

Good research, ajv. I would have never noticed those changes. :slight_smile:

Note that the vast majority of the feasts that were dropped in 1960 were still included in the Appendix to the typical edition, and are allowed to be celebrated as festal Masses on the appropriate days, according to the rubrics. Most lay hand missals cut them, so having a 1955 Missal can be useful since, in my experience, most indult sites make use of at least some of them

Are the only differences in most of the Sunday Masses the omission of the second Confiteor and the introduction of St. Joseph’s name in the Canon? If that’s the case, I really do not think I will bother looking through the 1955 Missal.

Incidentally, I was looking through a prayer book that belonged to my grandmother. It has a guide to the Mass, with some of the Latin (other parts just have the English translation). It is copyright 1905. My grandmother got the prayer book for her First Communion in 1913. I will check that out. It will be interesting to see if there were any differences in the Mass in 1905.

lak611, when you find differences could you PM them to me? I’ve found some (below), but I simply get too tired going through the missals. :o

Between 1905 and 1962 come several major-ish revisions- the motu proprio Abhinc Duos Annos of St. Pius X, the new editio typica of 1920, the editio typica of 1953, the changes of Cum Nostra and Maxima Redemptoris in 1956 and the changes of John XXIII and the new editio typica of 1962.

Again, not all that comprehensive:

Changes by Decree after the motu proprio Abhinc Duos Annos:
The feasts permanently allowed to be assigned to Sundays are the Most Holy Name of Jesus, and the Most Holy Trinity (to which Benedict XV added Kingship OLJC)

All feasts permanently occurring on the Sunday were either removed from the Universal Calendar and/or reassigned. The ordinary Sundays of the year could no longer be outranked by any except Doubles of the I, II Class.

II, III, IV Sundays of Lent were raised to the rank of Doubles I Class, outclassing all feasts.
The feast of the Holy Name was fixed for the Sunday between 1-6 Jan (excl.) or otherwise Jan. 2

The rules were established a bit more regarding octaves. Leo XIII had already initiated this. The Octaves were strictly classified within the privileged octaves and also the others. The octaves of the Comites Christi (i.e. the feasts of the saints immediately after Christmas) only got a mention on the Octave Day.

Only Doubles of the I and II Class could be transferred if they occurred on a Sunday. Greater Doubles and Doubles lost this privilege and were henceforth only commemorated

Patronage of St. Joseph- from III Sunday after Easter to the Wednesday before

The Vigil and the feast of St. John the Baptist Nativity- June 23 and 24.

The Holy Family from III Sunday after Epiphany to January 19 (later when it came on the General Calendar with Benedict XV it was moved to within the Octave of the Epiphany)
Finding of the Child Jesus- from the Sunday within the Epiphany to
Most Holy Name from the III Sunday after Epiphany to as above.
Mother of the Divine Shepherd from the I Sunday in May to
In some places- Sacred Heart of Jesus from III Sunday after Pentecost to Friday after Octave of Corpus Christi
BVM Perpetual Succour from Sunday before St. John the Baptist to June 27
Most Precious Blood OLJC from Sundaay after July 1 to July 1.
St. Joachim is moved to August 16 from the Sunday within the Octave of the Assumption, and St. Hyacinth is moved to August 17. St Lawerence’s Octave is commeorated
Most Pure Heart of B.V. Mary- from Sunday after August 22 to Saturday after the Octave of Corpus Christi (but when, in 1942, Pius XII established the feast of the Immaculate Heart, he did so on August 22)
Holy Name of May from Sunday within the Octave of the Nativity BVM to September 12
The feast of the VII Sorrows B.V.M., from the III Sunday in September to September 15.
The feast of the M.H. Rosary from I Sunday in October to October 7
II Sunday in October- Maternity BVM to October 11 (re-established by Benedict XV)
III Sunday in October – Purity BVM to October 16 (moved to pro alquibus locis)
IV Sunday in October- Patronage BVM (moved to particular calendars)
Most Holy Redeemer July 15 from October 23
St. Bartholomew-August 24 (fixed for all)
St. Louis – August 25 (fixed for all)

Then there are also many particular feasts that were moved- Joys BVM, BVM Consolation, Holy Relics, Guardian angels, various Patrons, etc.

There are also a large number of other calendar changes regarding occurrence, concurrence, etc… Then also the Votive Masses of Leo XIII are abolished, the rules from the votive Mass for Spouses are relaxed more, as the the rules for Requiems said as funeral Masses, etc. On the other hand the daily requiem rules are toughened slightly.

The collects prescribed to be said on feasts of lower rank have been changed slightly- new ones are prescribed.

Changes of the Missal 1920

There are many, many changes in the rubrics (both at the beginning and throughout) made for clarity. An “Additiones and Variationes” according to the norms of St. Pius X is added. But some of the main ones

The celebrant is instructed to bow profoundly to the altar, not incline his head when leaving was previously customary.

Many of the preparatory prayers of the priest have indulgences attached.

There is no change in the Ordinary unless you want to count the fact that only four intonations of the ’ Gloria ’ are retained and one intonation of the ’ Credo.’

The new Prefaces of St. Joseph and and for the Dead’ are inserted in their proper place, and the Prefaces of the Nativity and of the Ascension are also given in the ferial tone. Plus later there was the addition of the prefaces for the Sacred Heart and the Kingship.

In the Proper of Seasons, wherever the Holy Innocents is the patron, the ’ Gloria,’ ’ Alleluia,’ and ’ Ite Missa est ’ are said. Also a reduction in the commeorations that goes with the change for the octaves that I mentioned earlier.

The Secret of the Prayer of the BVM to be said on lower ranked feasts “Deus qui salutis” was changed from “Muneribus nostris” to another -“Tua Domine propitiation”

In the Secret of the Mass of Thursday after the first Sunday of Lent, the word propensius is substituted for propitius.

On Good Friday, the Improperia are divided for the deacon, subdeacon and celebrant.

In the Post Communion of Holy Saturday, Easter Sunday, and Easter Monday, the conclusion is “in unitate ejusdem Spiritus Sancti.”

Proper of Saints: I’ve not yet finished going through all- only the major feasts and the Popes. It’s a bit tiring :o But there are quite a few changes wherby the Commons have been switched- more than those listed below. I was also happily aided by an article on the changes to the Gospels.

January 19, St. Canute. The Gospel is no longer Si quis vult from the Mass Sacerdotes Dei, but Nolite arbitrari from the Mass In virtute. Likewise the Secret and ostcommunion are no longer from the Mass In Virtute but from the Mass Laetabitur.

January 31,St. Peter Nolasco. The Secret and Postcommunion are no longer from the Mass Justus, but from the Mass Os Justi.

February 14, St. Valentine. Secret “Oblatis” is changed to another one “Suscipe”

February 15, Ss. Faustinus and Jovita. For the Secret “Oblatis” and Postcommunion “Haec Nos” are substituted the Secret and Postcommunion of the Mass Intret. (many martyrs)

March 6, Ss. Perpetua and Felicitas. The Postcommunion Praesta is changed to a new one, “Mysticis, Domine”.

March 10, 40 Martyrs. The Secret “Sacrificiis” is replaced by “Preces, Domine,” and in place of the Postcommunion “Quaesumus” is “Sanctorum tuorum”.

April 23,St. George. Outside Eastertide, the Gospel Nolite arbitrari from the Mass In Virtute takes the place of the Gospel Siquis lenit from the Mass Statuit.

April 29, St. Peter Martyr. The Gospel, “Nihil est opertum” from the Mass Laetabitur, takes the place of the Gospel “Si quis vult” outside Eastertide

May 7, St. Stanislaus. Outside Eastertide, the Gospel is “Si quis vult” from the Mass Sacerdotes Dei, instead of “Si quis venit” from the Mass Statuit.

May 18 St. Venantius. Outside Eastertide the Gospel is no longer “Si quis venit” from the Mass Statuit, but “Nolite arbitrary” from the Mass In virtute.

May 26. St. Eleutherius. The Secret is “Munera” instead of “Hostias” and the Postcommunion “Haec nos” instead of “Refecti”. What essentially was done was the switching of the Common as it stood then from Statuit Ei to Sacerdotes Dei. This was common for several other Popes sin the calendar.

May 30, St. Felix. same.

August 16, St. Joachim. The word “ferto” from “confer” in Gradual Versicle: Joachim, sanctae conjux Annae, pater almae Virginis, hic famulis ferto salutis opem.

September 22, St. Thomas. The Secret is “Sancti Thomae”, and the Postcommunion “Deus fidelium remunerator”, both from the Mass Sacerdotes Dei.

September 28, St. Wenceslaus. The Gospel “Nolite arbitrary” is substituted for “Si quis vult”

October 7, Holy Rosary. In the Preface the words Et te in Festivitate are substituted for Et te in sollemnitate.

November 10, Martyrs Trypho, etc. The Epistle begins, “Fratres : Existimo, quod non sunt condignae”

November 11, St. Martin. A new Secret “Sanctifica, quaesumus” instead of “Da, misericors Deus”

Common of Saints:

The Common of Many Martyrs outside of Paschal time is placed before the Common of Martyrs within Paschal time, and that in the third Mass of the former the principal Gospel is now Attendite a fermento pharisaeorum, not Sedente Jesu.

In the Common of Doctors two Secrets are given, one for a Doctor Pontiff and the other for a Doctor non-Pontiff, Sancti N. Pontificis tui atque Doctor is nobis Domine, etc., and Sancti N. Conjessoris tui atque Doctor is nobis Domine, etc.

For the Common of Feasts of the Blessed Virgin there is given only one Mass, the Secret of which is always Tua Domine.Before what was common was around 5 Masses which doubled for both feasts and votives. In the 1920 missal, under the heading Missae de Sancta Maria in Sabbato are given five Masses of the Blessed Virgin, prescribed for the several seasons of the year. The headings of the several Masses are changed to the following : (i) Per Adventum, (ii) Ab octava Epiphaniae usque ad diem 1 Februarii, (iii) A die 3 Februarii usque ad Sabbatum post Sexagesimam, (iv) Tempore Paschali, (v) A Sabbato post Octavam S. Corporis Christi usque ad Dominicam 1 Adventus. In No. ii. of these Masses the Secret is now Tua Domine, not Muneribus as heretofore. Notable also is that Mass iii cannot be said during Lent.

In the Various prayers for the Dead the letter ’ N ’ is inserted, and in the Postcommunion reads : . . . ’ clementer indulgeas et eas in tuorum laetantium redemptorum sede constituas’

Pro aliquibus locis: this section has been drastically cut with only 62 Masses remaining. I will try and make a list of all of them.

In addition there is a Supplement containing a Common of many Confessors-Pontiff, many Confessors non- Pontiff, many Virgins, many non- Virgins.

There was also a bigg-ish change to the Missal of the Dead, which I’m working on writing.

Changes in the 1953 editio typica
There is a new Common Si diligus Mei consequently affecting the feasts of most Popes. also the new Masses of saints and a new Mass for the Assumption. Usual clarity of rubrics especially for Purification, Ash Wednesday and other major occasions. A re-writing of the rubrics for the blessing and aspersion of lustral water. Added rubrics for the order of ferial masses copied from the 1st Sunday of Advent to the others.

And the following is from a handy article by Msgr. Bugnini in Ephemerides Liturgicae:

All feasts now have their rank after their title.
Gospels that are proper are marked ‘P’.
The Creed for octaves is marked for each day.
Two new compiled tables of the orations [later the ones omitted]
Some new approved illustrations;
Prayer of St Ambrose for the various days of the week has been amended
Changes in the title of those other preparatory prayers eg. Oratio ad S Joseph become Preces ad S Joseph
Dominica in Albis: rationabiles replaced by rationabile in the Introit

Great!:thumbsup: Thanks for the information. Which missal do most Traditionalists prefer? The indult that I usually go to is 1962.

Most use the 1962–the sedevacatists use usually an earlier one because they don’t acknowledge any acts of Bl. John XXIII

Most use the 1962–the sedevacatists use usually an earlier one because they don’t acknowledge any acts of Bl. John XXIII

Not true. Many don’t have the 1962 Missal but they still manage to make it work because there is not that much difference. In my pre-62 Missals I simply write in the words “St. Joseph…” in the Canon. No big deal.

Now if you’re talking altar missals, then that’s a different story.

I have a 1955 missal, and am pretty new to the TLM…So, am I going to be able to follow along, (at an indulte Mass) despite the differences between the two missals?

[quote]
Ok, maybe it would help if I were more specific with my questions, because there’s much I don’t understand here. Please forgive me if my questions are dumb.

[quote]The differences are:

Ranks are changed. 1955 is Double I Class, Double II Class, Greater Double, double, Simple, commemoration. 1962 is I Class, II Class, III Class, IV Class (for feriae), Commemoration. Along with this, many feasts lose the right to be transferred, and Sundays take precedence over more feasts.

[/quote]

What is a Class? What’s a Simple? What’s a commemoration?

The following feasts are omitted from the 1962 books: Finding of Holy Cross, St. John before the Latin gate, Apparition of St. Michael, St. Peter’s Chains, Finding of St. Stephen, Chair of St. Peter at Antioch . Also St. Anacletus is only celebrated under the name St. Cletus (April 26), and St. Vitalis is only celebrated under the name which appears together with St. Agricola (Nov. 26).

Would this make any difference in the actual following along of the Mass (in the missal) if these feasts are omitted? In other words, are the prayers and readings still the same?

The Mass of the Rogations is linked with the procession.

What is Rogations?

A 1955 missal with the changes of the Holy Week would be usable at a 1962 Mass.

How do I know if mine has this?
Pax Christi,
Ann
[/quote]

Not at all. The only dumb questions are the ones you don’t ask (at least, I think that’s how the saying goes :slight_smile: )

What is a Class? What’s a Simple? What’s a commemoration?

In the Church’s calendar we have many feasts. Also we have Sundays and ordinary weekdays (feriae). Some weekdays (e.g. Lent) are more importnat than others.

We also have two cycles (i) a fixed cycle with feasts that occur on the same day every year (ii) the moveable cycle consisting of Sundays, and also Easter and the Sundays and feasts that depend on Easter. e.g. the III Sunday after Easter will occur on a different day every year. So will the III Sunday after Pentecost because Pentecost is calculated from Easter. You get the idea.

So with these two cycles, some of the feasts will overlap every year. So the question is: how do we decide which Mass to say, and what do we do with the other feast. So we have calendar rankings (also for other reasons in the Divine Office but this is the main one for the Mass).

The original calendar rankings were Doubles, Semidoubles and Simples. There are different reasons attributed for the names- some say it was because of two Masses celebrated on ‘double’ easts. Others say it was because in the Divine Office, before and after the psalm, we say the whole antiphon (i.e. we ‘double’ it) .Etc.

For historical reasons, eventually a large number of feasts became doubles. Basically, on doubles the clergy had to recite less psalms, so they made almost every feast a ‘double’. So to further distguish it, they added 3 new ranks- Double of the 1st Class, Double of the 2nd Class and Greater Doubles.

So the ranks were
Double of the 1st Class
Double of the 2nd Class
Greater Double
Double
Semidouble
Simple

And as you can see, if two feasts/Sundays occur on the same day, the one with the higher rank will be observed.

In 1960, they simplified everything. They came up with a whole new set of rankings for feasts

I Class
II Class
III Class
IV Class

So, for example, let us take July 1. July 1 is the feast of the Precious Blood. The rank is I Class. It will fall on a Sunday this year- the V Sunday after Pentecost- which has a rank of II Class. So the Mass said is the Mass of the Precious Blood not the Sunday. But because the Sundays are special, we commemorate the Sunday.

A commemoration, for the Mass, means that we add the Collect, Secret and Postcommunion of the feast/Sunday we are commemorating after the Collect/Secret/Postcommunion of the Mass of the day. In the above example, the priest will say the Collect of the Sunday V after the Collect of the Precious Blood is said.

Would this make any difference in the actual following along of the Mass (in the missal) if these feasts are omitted? In other words, are the prayers and readings still the same?

The feast is not required to be celebrated- it is erased from the Universal calendar day together with its Mass. So on that day (assuming its a weekday and not in Lent), the priest may say a different Mass- either the Mass of the previous Sunday, or a Votive Mass, or a Mass for the Dead.

What is Rogations?

From fisheaters

How do I know if mine has this?
Pax Christi,
Ann

Does the Gospel on Palm Sunday include the Institution of the Holy Eucharist or does it start with Christ in Gethsemane?

AJV:
Many thanks. This will help me. I’ll get back with any questions later, if it’s Ok.:slight_smile:
Pax Christi,
Ann

A commemoration, for the Mass, means that we add the Collect, Secret and Postcommunion of the feast/Sunday we are commemorating after the Collect/Secret/Postcommunion of the Mass of the day. In the above example, the priest will say the Collect of the Sunday V after the Collect of the Precious Blood is said.

If your priest commemorated the 4th Sunday after Pentecost, then he made a mistake. Under the rules of the 1962 missal, when a feast of Our Lord pre-empts a Sunday, there is no commemoration of the Sunday. If another first class feast, not of Our Lord, pre-empts the Sunday, then the Sunday is commemorated. That is why last Sunday’s feast, that of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, included a commemoration of the 3rd Sunday after Pentecost, but today’s feast did not follow suit.

The FSSP ordo lays this out very nicely.

I may regret asking this but aren’t the Indult Masses all for the Missal of 1962?

I can always rely on you Chatter :thumbsup: - that is true- the 5th Sunday of Pentecost will not be commemorated in the 1962 missal this year. My mistake.

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