2 May

OK, Traditionalists, can you name, right now, no peeking, the Saint Of The Day?:smiley:

For those of you who are stumped, here is a subtle clue…:rolleyes:

saintpatrickdc.org/ss/0502.htm

Now, can you recite his creed, word perfect, from memory?:whistle:

So it’s not St Patrick? :stuck_out_tongue:

Unfortunately no I can’t, it’s a bit long for me to memorise :o And I don’t recite it week in week out like other versions either

Saint Athanatius. :slight_smile:

What do I win?

One “attaboy”:stuck_out_tongue:

Super! I’ll have to remember to look up the Saint(s) of the day every day with my morning prayers! :slight_smile:

Saint Athanasius

http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/sainta15.jpg

Bishop of Alexandria; Confessor and Doctor of the Church; born c. 296; died 2 May, 373. Athanasius was the greatest champion of Catholic belief on the subject of the Incarnation that the Church has ever known and in his lifetime earned the characteristic title of “Father of Orthodoxy”, by which he has been distinguished every since. While the chronology of his career still remains for the most part a hopelessly involved problem, the fullest material for an account of the main achievements of his life will be found in his collected writings and in the contemporary records of his time. He was born, it would seem, in Alexandria, most probably between the years 296 and 298. An earlier date, 293, is sometimes assigned as the more certain year of his birth; and it is supported apparently by the authority of the “Coptic Fragment” (published by Dr. O. von Lemm among the Mémoires de l’académie impériale des sciences de S. Péterbourg, 1888) and corroborated by the undoubted maturity of judgement revealed in the two treatises “Contra Gentes” and “De Incarnatione”, which were admittedly written about the year 318 before Arianism as a movement had begun to make itself felt. It must be remembered, however, that in two distinct passages of his writings (Hist. Ar., lxiv, and De Syn., xviii) Athanasius shrinks from speaking as a witness at first hand of the persecution which had broken out under Maximian in 303; for in referring to the events of this period he makes no direct appeal to his own personal recollections, but falls back, rather, on tradition. Such reserve would scarcely be intelligible, if, on the hypothesis of the earlier date, the Saint had been then a boy fully ten years old. Besides, there must have been some semblance of a foundation in fact for the charge brought against him by his accusers in after-life (Index to the Festal Letters) that at the times of his consecration to the episcopate in 328 he had not yet attained the canonical age of thirty years. These considerations, therefore, even if they are found to be not entirely convincing, would seem to make it likely that he was born not earlier than 296 nor later than 298.

To read the remaining 6,374 words of his entry in the Catholic Encyclopedia, navigate here: newadvent.org/cathen/02035a.htm

My husband’s Lutheran church recites the Athanasian creed from time to time. Very interesting…

I was going to say Athanasius:D I always look at my calendar when I start the day. Also at daily school Mass the priest will talk about the Saint of the Day.

:heart:Blyss

You win the satisfaction of knowing you’re the first one on this forum to answer the question correctly.

Now, what is the May 3 feast day on the Traditional calendar?

According to the Liturgy of the Hours and a local parish I went to for Mass that day, it’s St. Philip and St. James, Apostles. Is it different in the Traditional calendar that you’re referring to? Please pardon my ignorance, but I’m not quite sure what the Traditional calendar is - did the Feast Day calendar change with Vatican II as well? :confused:

I’d also like to add that in Poland, May 3 is the Feast of Mary, Queen of Poland, so that’s how I usually think of it. :slight_smile:

Sts. Philip and James feast was celebrated on May 1 until Pope Pius XII made it the feast of St. Joseph the Worker in 1950. Pius XII moved Sts. Philip and James to May 11. The new calendar moved it to May 3, but the Tridentine Mass doesn’t follow the new calendar, so it is still celebrated on May 11.

Yes, the calendar was changed when the Paul VI Missal was promulgated in 1969. There were many feast days removed, such as the feast of the Precious Blood, and others transferred to different dates, such as the feast of Sts. Philip and James.

I have included links to both the Traditional calendar and the Novus Ordo calendar. NO calendar is the USCCB website and is in PDF format. On the Traditional calendar website, scroll down to the bottom for each month’s feast days.

traditio.com/cal.htm

nccbuscc.org/liturgy/current/2007cal.pdf

Invention/Finding of the Cross but that’s not the one according to the 1962 books.

Then I would check the book again. Finding of the Cross is May 3.

What feast is in your book for May 3?

No, the Finding of the Cross as a ‘doublet’ of the Exhaltation on September 14 was removed by Bl. John XXIII.

Provide your reference because I’ve been to the 1962 Indult Tridentine Mass on May 3 and it was for the Finding of the Cross.

A votive, maybe?

It’s in the set of decrees promulgating the revised books, including the new kalendrium. I’m not sure exactly what references I can give, but I’ll look. In the meantime:

Look here . Oh and I just “remembered” :stuck_out_tongue: May 3 is Pope Alexander. The *legend *was about what he did for the Mass.

The calendar you provided is for England and Wales, not the United States. It says so on the home page.

latin-mass-society.org/ordo.htm

No, it wasn’t a votive Mass, it was stated it was the Mass of the day.

The link for feast days in May is provided below.

traditio.com/calendar/cal0705.htm

May 8 is the feast of the Apparition of St. Michael the Archangel, but it is not on the link you provided.

Notice also that May 3 a commemoration of St. Alexander is observed.

The Liturgical calendar differs slightly for certain countries. My missal specifically states feasts that are for the United States only.

Maybe the Finding of the Cross was removed in England and Wales or maybe it was never celebrated. It is still on the Traditional calendar in the United States.

Yes, because that also was removed as was St. John before the Latin Gate. traditio follows the pre-1955 arrangement.

Notice also that May 3 a commemoration of St. Alexander is observed.

The Liturgical calendar differs slightly for certain countries. My missal specifically states feasts that are for the United States only.

Maybe the Finding of the Cross was removed in England and Wales or maybe it was never celebrated. It is still on the Traditional calendar in the United States.

No not for E&W only, but for the entire Latin Church, but indults were given to certain countries to continue with it. I didn’t know the US was among them, thanks. :thumbsup:

This also is still in my Missal and is still celebrated as the Mass of the day (except this year since it fell on a Sunday).

Read again, the link specifically says it is for England and Wales.

The Extended Liturgical Calendar (for the celebration of Mass in accordance with the Roman Missal of 1962), specifically tailored for the dioceses of England and Wales, is as follows:
latin-mass-society.org/ordo.htm

Those feasts were not removed from the 1962 calendar in the Universal Church. Check the page for the changes in the 1962 Missal.

latin-mass-society.org/ordo/ordonotes.htm

No mention of the Finding of the Cross or St. John before the Latin Gate being removed from the calendar.

I realize Traditio goes by the 1955 Missal. However, the clear majority of feasts remain the same in the 1962 Missal.

Yes, the Ordo is for E&W but the change (removal) of the feasts was done for the entire Latin Church (with exceptions granted). Perhaps you could ask your priest to show you his altar missal?

Technically, the Propers of various places are not permitted to **omit **feasts that occur on the Universal calendar. E&W would not have special permission to do so if it was not done for the Latin Church. They can add their own, or sometimes, even have a local saint outrank, and in very rare cases, transfer, but they cannot omit.

Can I ask if the feasts (Invention of the Cross, etc.) are found in the Proper Feasts section for the USA or among the other feasts of the sanctorale in your missal? And what rank do they have?

No mention of the Finding of the Cross or St. John before the Latin Gate being removed from the calendar.

I realize Traditio goes by the 1955 Missal. However, the clear majority of feasts remain the same in the 1962 Missal.

I can’t speak as to why they don’t mention it but it was removed :slight_smile: insofar as the day appears as a feria in the calendar.

The majority of feasts are the same, but some were removed. Another example the the Cathedra Petri at Rome which was combined with the *Cathedra Petri *at Antioch to form one feast on the latter’s date. Then also another feast of St. Peter that was suppressed was ad Vincula on August 1. St. Stephen also has one of his doublets removed: the Finding of St. Stephen. That omission also should appear in the altar missal.

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