23 Ways to Identify a Faithful Parish


#1

I saw this on another website, I loved it! It’s from Crisis Magazine so it may not be for the more Liberal of us…

  1. There is at least one daily Mass. Obviously, if a parish shares a pastor with other parishes, this may not always be possible.
    But barring that, a parish needs to offer daily Mass.

  2. Confession is offered for a set time… not just “by appointment
    only.” The absolute importance of that sacrament must not be
    diminished.

  3. The tabernacle is inside the main church in a prominent place.
    It’s always frustrating to have to play “Where’s Jesus?” when you
    walk into a parish for the first time. I recall once when visiting a
    church I’d never been in before, I confusedly genuflected to
    everything from the cantor to a statue of St. Therese before I
    figured out where the tabernacle was.

  4. The church has kneelers. Period.

  5. The church doesn’t have a sign in the front that describes itself
    as a “Catholic Community.” I know, this one seems petty at first, but it tends to be true. If a parish has an objection to the word
    "church," that’s a good indication that a larger problem exists. And
    if that parish magnifies the nonsense with a sign that says something like, “An Open, Inclusive Community of Catholic Christians Who Care and Share,” stop, turn around, run.

  6. As you enter the church, you see people in the pews in prayer or, at least, reverent silence. If, on the other hand, it looks like
    social time down at the bingo parlor, that’s a bad sign.

  7. The Mass is not intentionally altered through the use of
    inclusive language.

  8. The Mass is said according to the General Instruction of the
    Roman Missal and the instructions of the local bishop. Improvisation is great in jazz. Mass isn’t jazz.

  9. The gospel is not being read, nor the homily given, by someone
    other than a priest or deacon.

  10. Latin has pride of place in the Mass. It’s right there in the
    documents of the Second Vatican Council. That should be reflected in the liturgy itself.

  11. The bread for the Eucharist isn’t made with added ingredients
    not allowed by the Church. Honey, for example.

  12. The liturgical music focuses on God, not the community. We are there, after all, to worship Him, not ourselves. And there’s never a good reason to sing songs about bridges over troubled waters. You can do that at home, Mr. Garfunkel.

  13. Extraordinary ministers do not outnumber the parishioners.
    There’s a reason, after all, that we refer to them as EXTRAORDINARY ministers. We only use them when there are too many people for the priest and deacon to handle.

  14. If you’re able to find the mission statement of the parish (it’s
    often carried in the bulletin), make sure it says something about
    fidelity to the Magisterium of the Church.

  15. And while you’re thumbing through the bulletin, see if there are
    other good groups there, like the Knights of Columbus, Legion of
    Mary, St. Vincent de Paul, and Holy Name Society. A faithful Bible study group is also a great sign.

  16. The parish offers some form of Eucharistic adoration.

  17. The parish has an active Pro-Life ministry, as well as a
    ministry that cares for the poor.

  18. The priest wears his collar. Now, obviously, if you see your
    local pastor jogging one morning, he’s not going to be wearing his
    clericals. But a priest should generally look the part. It’s an
    important witness to the secular world and a sign that he recognizes the great value of his own vocation.

  19. The pastor isn’t afraid to preach on the tough issues: abortion,
    divorce, contraception, cloning, etc. That’s not to say that every
    homily should cover those topics. But a priest should truly believe
    the Church’s teaching and defend them without pause.

  20. The parish’s marriage preparation program includes instruction
    in Natural Family Planning (NFP). And if someone involved in the
    program describes NFP as “the rhythm method,” go immediately limp and drop to the ground. With luck, he’ll think you passed out and will take you to the emergency room, far, far away from that parish.

  21. The church has a vibrant religious education program for both
    children and adults based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church. You might also try to find out who’s involved in the program and where they received their own formation.

  22. The church’s Website doesn’t link to dissident groups like Call
    to Action, Voice of the Faithful, or Catholics for a Free Choice.

And finally…

  1. If there’s a literature rack in the church, look at the
    publications the parish is carrying. Dissident magazines or
    newspapers tend to go hand in hand with a dissident parish. On the other hand, should you see a copy of Crisis in the rack, join that parish. The pastor is clearly a man of great taste and refinemen.

My parish hits all but kneelers because of new construction!


#2

Well you just about eliminated about 99% of the churches in the US, I guess only about 1% are faithful, which is more than most people probably expected anyway!

[quote=netmilsmom]I saw this on another website, I loved it! It’s from Crisis Magazine so it may not be for the more Liberal of us…

  1. There is at least one daily Mass. Obviously, if a parish shares a pastor with other parishes, this may not always be possible.
    But barring that, a parish needs to offer daily Mass.

  2. Confession is offered for a set time… not just “by appointment
    only.” The absolute importance of that sacrament must not be
    diminished.

  3. The tabernacle is inside the main church in a prominent place.
    It’s always frustrating to have to play “Where’s Jesus?” when you
    walk into a parish for the first time. I recall once when visiting a
    church I’d never been in before, I confusedly genuflected to
    everything from the cantor to a statue of St. Therese before I
    figured out where the tabernacle was.

  4. The church has kneelers. Period.

  5. The church doesn’t have a sign in the front that describes itself
    as a “Catholic Community.” I know, this one seems petty at first, but it tends to be true. If a parish has an objection to the word
    "church," that’s a good indication that a larger problem exists. And
    if that parish magnifies the nonsense with a sign that says something like, “An Open, Inclusive Community of Catholic Christians Who Care and Share,” stop, turn around, run.

  6. As you enter the church, you see people in the pews in prayer or, at least, reverent silence. If, on the other hand, it looks like
    social time down at the bingo parlor, that’s a bad sign.

  7. The Mass is not intentionally altered through the use of
    inclusive language.

  8. The Mass is said according to the General Instruction of the
    Roman Missal and the instructions of the local bishop. Improvisation is great in jazz. Mass isn’t jazz.

  9. The gospel is not being read, nor the homily given, by someone
    other than a priest or deacon.

  10. Latin has pride of place in the Mass. It’s right there in the
    documents of the Second Vatican Council. That should be reflected in the liturgy itself.

  11. The bread for the Eucharist isn’t made with added ingredients
    not allowed by the Church. Honey, for example.

  12. The liturgical music focuses on God, not the community. We are there, after all, to worship Him, not ourselves. And there’s never a good reason to sing songs about bridges over troubled waters. You can do that at home, Mr. Garfunkel.

  13. Extraordinary ministers do not outnumber the parishioners.
    There’s a reason, after all, that we refer to them as EXTRAORDINARY ministers. We only use them when there are too many people for the priest and deacon to handle.

  14. If you’re able to find the mission statement of the parish (it’s
    often carried in the bulletin), make sure it says something about
    fidelity to the Magisterium of the Church.

  15. And while you’re thumbing through the bulletin, see if there are
    other good groups there, like the Knights of Columbus, Legion of
    Mary, St. Vincent de Paul, and Holy Name Society. A faithful Bible study group is also a great sign.

  16. The parish offers some form of Eucharistic adoration.

  17. The parish has an active Pro-Life ministry, as well as a
    ministry that cares for the poor.

  18. The priest wears his collar. Now, obviously, if you see your
    local pastor jogging one morning, he’s not going to be wearing his
    clericals. But a priest should generally look the part. It’s an
    important witness to the secular world and a sign that he recognizes the great value of his own vocation.

  19. The pastor isn’t afraid to preach on the tough issues: abortion,
    divorce, contraception, cloning, etc. That’s not to say that every
    homily should cover those topics. But a priest should truly believe
    the Church’s teaching and defend them without pause.

  20. The parish’s marriage preparation program includes instruction
    in Natural Family Planning (NFP). And if someone involved in the
    program describes NFP as “the rhythm method,” go immediately limp and drop to the ground. With luck, he’ll think you passed out and will take you to the emergency room, far, far away from that parish.

  21. The church has a vibrant religious education program for both
    children and adults based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church. You might also try to find out who’s involved in the program and where they received their own formation.

  22. The church’s Website doesn’t link to dissident groups like Call
    to Action, Voice of the Faithful, or Catholics for a Free Choice.

And QUOTE]
[/quote]


#3

Well you just about eliminated about 99% of the churches in the US

[quote=netmilsmom]I saw this on another website, I loved it! It’s from Crisis Magazine so it may not be for the more Liberal of us…

  1. There is at least one daily Mass. Obviously, if a parish shares a pastor with other parishes, this may not always be possible.
    But barring that, a parish needs to offer daily Mass.

  2. Confession is offered for a set time… not just “by appointment
    only.” The absolute importance of that sacrament must not be
    diminished.

  3. The tabernacle is inside the main church in a prominent place.
    It’s always frustrating to have to play “Where’s Jesus?” when you
    walk into a parish for the first time. I recall once when visiting a
    church I’d never been in before, I confusedly genuflected to
    everything from the cantor to a statue of St. Therese before I
    figured out where the tabernacle was.

  4. The church has kneelers. Period.

  5. The church doesn’t have a sign in the front that describes itself
    as a “Catholic Community.” I know, this one seems petty at first, but it tends to be true. If a parish has an objection to the word
    "church," that’s a good indication that a larger problem exists. And
    if that parish magnifies the nonsense with a sign that says something like, “An Open, Inclusive Community of Catholic Christians Who Care and Share,” stop, turn around, run.

  6. As you enter the church, you see people in the pews in prayer or, at least, reverent silence. If, on the other hand, it looks like
    social time down at the bingo parlor, that’s a bad sign.

  7. The Mass is not intentionally altered through the use of
    inclusive language.

  8. The Mass is said according to the General Instruction of the
    Roman Missal and the instructions of the local bishop. Improvisation is great in jazz. Mass isn’t jazz.

  9. The gospel is not being read, nor the homily given, by someone
    other than a priest or deacon.

  10. Latin has pride of place in the Mass. It’s right there in the
    documents of the Second Vatican Council. That should be reflected in the liturgy itself.

  11. The bread for the Eucharist isn’t made with added ingredients
    not allowed by the Church. Honey, for example.

  12. The liturgical music focuses on God, not the community. We are there, after all, to worship Him, not ourselves. And there’s never a good reason to sing songs about bridges over troubled waters. You can do that at home, Mr. Garfunkel.

  13. Extraordinary ministers do not outnumber the parishioners.
    There’s a reason, after all, that we refer to them as EXTRAORDINARY ministers. We only use them when there are too many people for the priest and deacon to handle.

  14. If you’re able to find the mission statement of the parish (it’s
    often carried in the bulletin), make sure it says something about
    fidelity to the Magisterium of the Church.

  15. And while you’re thumbing through the bulletin, see if there are
    other good groups there, like the Knights of Columbus, Legion of
    Mary, St. Vincent de Paul, and Holy Name Society. A faithful Bible study group is also a great sign.

  16. The parish offers some form of Eucharistic adoration.

  17. The parish has an active Pro-Life ministry, as well as a
    ministry that cares for the poor.

  18. The priest wears his collar. Now, obviously, if you see your
    local pastor jogging one morning, he’s not going to be wearing his
    clericals. But a priest should generally look the part. It’s an
    important witness to the secular world and a sign that he recognizes the great value of his own vocation.

  19. The pastor isn’t afraid to preach on the tough issues: abortion,
    divorce, contraception, cloning, etc. That’s not to say that every
    homily should cover those topics. But a priest should truly believe
    the Church’s teaching and defend them without pause.

  20. The parish’s marriage preparation program includes instruction
    in Natural Family Planning (NFP). And if someone involved in the
    program describes NFP as “the rhythm method,” go immediately limp and drop to the ground. With luck, he’ll think you passed out and will take you to the emergency room, far, far away from that parish.

  21. The church has a vibrant religious education program for both
    children and adults based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church. You might also try to find out who’s involved in the program and where they received their own formation.

  22. The church’s Website doesn’t link to dissident groups like Call
    to Action, Voice of the Faithful, or Catholics for a Free Choice.

And finally…

  1. If there’s a literature rack in the church, look at the
    publications the parish is carrying. Dissident magazines or
    newspapers tend to go hand in hand with a dissident parish. On the other hand, should you see a copy of Crisis in the rack, join that parish. The pastor is clearly a man of great taste and refinemen.

My parish hits all but kneelers because of new construction!
[/quote]


#4

[quote=CrusaderNY]Well you just about eliminated about 99% of the churches in the US
[/quote]

Honestly, you would be surprised. I am on a conservative website with a huge Catholic following. There are many of these in the US. It just takes time and word of mouth to find them.

Someone actually suggested a kind of BBB to find a good church!


#5

[quote=netmilsmom]Honestly, you would be surprised. I am on a conservative website with a huge Catholic following. There are many of these in the US. It just takes time and word of mouth to find them.

Someone actually suggested a kind of BBB to find a good church!
[/quote]

I think it’s good. But on the other hand, if you find a conservative diocese where liberals run things, it’s better to keep things on the low before the folks who run things find out and start persecuting people. :mad:


#6

[quote=EddieArent]I think it’s good. But on the other hand, if you find a conservative diocese where liberals run things, it’s better to keep things on the low before the folks who run things find out and start persecuting people. :mad:
[/quote]

Amen, my friend!
The DRE at my new, very conservative parish told me not to spread the word too much.
The ax could fall on us!


#7

[quote=netmilsmom]There is at least one daily Mass.
[/quote]

At my (progressive) parish we also pray the Liturgy of the Hours as the Council asked.

Confession is offered for a set time… not just “by appointment only.”

We make both available. People take confession seriously. Unlike before the Council where more than four minutes in the confessional resulting in people thinking you fell asleep, we take about 15 minutes a person.

The tabernacle is inside the main church in a prominent place. It’s always frustrating to have to play “Where’s Jesus?” when you walk into a parish for the first time. I recall once when visiting a church I’d never been in before, I confusedly genuflected to everything from the cantor to a statue of St. Therese before I figured out where the tabernacle was.

In my parish we have done a good job in promoting the genuflection as a eucharistic devotion and not just a habit, so you don’t see people genuflecting to St. Therese.

Of course, those who go around visiting parishes with little notebooks so they can make their reports on all their shortcomings are probably too distracted to notice even the most obvious placement.

The church doesn’t have a sign in the front that describes itself as a “Catholic Community.” … And if that parish magnifies the nonsense with a sign that says something like, “An Open, Inclusive Community of Catholic Christians Who Care and Share,” stop, turn around, run.

We call ourselves a church not because we like “churchy” words. We believe our community is a true particular church. Not some administrative subdivison of the diocese that is just a place the bishop finds convienent to have Mass said. Needless so say, we empathize with those in Boston who are having their church suppressed.

And certainly we are not a place for someone looking for a closed, exclusive, uncaring and unsharing unrelated amalgamation of people.

If, on the other hand, it looks like social time down at the bingo parlor, that’s a bad sign.

Bingo is soooo old Catholic.

The Mass is not intentionally altered through the use of
inclusive language.

The fact you have accepted the term inclusive language shows we won this war, we are just waiting to finalize the terms of surrender.

The gospel is not being read, nor the homily given, by someone other than a priest or deacon.

Unlike conservative parishes were if the issue is money, all of suddden this rule gets set aside, our parish lay leaders regularly address us at the end of Mass.

Latin has pride of place in the Mass. It’s right there in the documents of the Second Vatican Council. That should be reflected in the liturgy itself.

No problem there. And not that tired, monotone, mumbled, mispronounced latin conservatives like. We have an active, engaged, participating laity which allows us to have a wonderful choir.

The bread for the Eucharist isn’t made with added ingredients not allowed by the Church. Honey, for example.

What do conservatives do, send “tasters” out to various parishes?

If you’re able to find the mission statement of the parish (it’s often carried in the bulletin), make sure it says something about fidelity to the Magisterium of the Church.

Yes, it might mean they take their lay vocation seriously. Only a conservative would instinctively assume, sight unseen, that if the parish has reflected on their lay vocation, it must have done something wrong. Jansenism lives!!!

And while you’re thumbing through the bulletin, see if there are other good groups there, like the Knights of Columbus, Legion of Mary, St. Vincent de Paul, and Holy Name Society. A faithful Bible study group is also a great sign.

Bible Study? Sounds rather post-Counciliar.

The parish offers some form of Eucharistic adoration

I once asked a conservative friend if he would join me for our parish Corpus Christi procession. He declined, saying he wasn’t comfortable walking through our neighborhood as it was too ‘colorful’, if you know what I mean.

The parish has an active Pro-Life ministry, as well as a
ministry that cares for the poor.

My parish has both as a sign of the seemless garment of Catholic social concerns.

The priest wears his collar.

No collar; those funny brown robes.

The pastor isn’t afraid to preach on the tough issues: abortion,divorce, contraception, cloning, etc. That’s not to say that every homily should cover those topics. But a priest should truly believe the Church’s teaching and defend them without pause.

Well, we’re not like a nearby conservative parish where Father is carefully not to upset the rich white boys that pay for his vacation in San Juan every year by preaching social justice.


#8

This is an excellent list!

Our church hits all but 2 1/2. I only give it 1/2 on adult education, they have a good bible study class during Lenten season but I wish they had more.

Our archidocese has a program for people to be trained to read the epistle, I don’t have a problem with that as I believe there is a strong need for vocational assistance from lay people due to the number of priests in most archdioceses, and as long as it’s taken seriously, we just don’t have enough priests and deacons to go around.

We don’t have any Latin in our mass, I wasn’t sure if you were saying on that one that some parishes conduct their Mass in Latin? I didn’t count that one.

I love most that our church has 2 masses every morning of the week, 7 and 8:30, which gives me a chance to hit one or the other a lot even with demands of work.


#9

Poppycock.

Making the language of the Sacramentary and Lectionary acceptable to the fetid and abominable desires of the sexist-feminist special interest just ain’t gonna happen, thanks be to God.

Even with the election of Bishop Donald Trautman as the chairman of the Bishops’ Committee on the Liturgy, the BCL will loose in a nasty train wreck with Mother Vatican if they try anything “progressive.”


#10

[quote=katherine2] …Well, we’re not like a nearby conservative parish where Father is carefully not to upset the rich white boys that pay for his vacation in San Juan every year by preaching social justice.
[/quote]

So you are a racist as well? Why do you dump your bitter venom on these threads?


#11

I see that it is no use arguing with the common day Catholic. You rely on your own righteousness to get you into Heaven. You believe your deeds surpass the deeds credited to you when you receive Christ’s righteousness by faith. Paul calls it a false gospel that isn’t a gospel at all. That was his whole letter to the Eph.

I know now my blunt statement will get deleted as well as my account, but the word of God will never see decay! It is clear faith alone saves without any effort of man, everything else derives from faith including works. I hope God will bless you and you will except the gospel and also have a place in eternity. Until then you are damned to the eternal flames of Hell.

Sola gratia, sola Christo, sola fide, and sola Scriptura equals Soli Deo Gloria!

By grace alone through Christ alone by faith alone, and also Scripture alone as authority will equal all the Glory to Him alone! God fulfils His purpose for the vessels of mercy and the vessels of destruction without fail. May you be a vessel of mercy and except His sacrifice on the cross and through faith alone be saved.

God bless you all.


#12

[quote=katherine2]At my (progressive) parish we also pray the Liturgy of the Hours as the Council asked.

We make both available. People take confession seriously. Unlike before the Council where more than four minutes in the confessional resulting in people thinking you fell asleep, we take about 15 minutes a person.

In my parish we have done a good job in promoting the genuflection as a eucharistic devotion and not just a habit, so you don’t see people genuflecting to St. Therese.

Of course, those who go around visiting parishes with little notebooks so they can make their reports on all their shortcomings are probably too distracted to notice even the most obvious placement.

We call ourselves a church not because we like “churchy” words. We believe our community is a true particular church. Not some administrative subdivison of the diocese that is just a place the bishop finds convienent to have Mass said. Needless so say, we empathize with those in Boston who are having their church suppressed.

And certainly we are not a place for someone looking for a closed, exclusive, uncaring and unsharing unrelated amalgamation of people.

Bingo is soooo old Catholic.

The fact you have accepted the term inclusive language shows we won this war, we are just waiting to finalize the terms of surrender.

Unlike conservative parishes were if the issue is money, all of suddden this rule gets set aside, our parish lay leaders regularly address us at the end of Mass.

No problem there. And not that tired, monotone, mumbled, mispronounced latin conservatives like. We have an active, engaged, participating laity which allows us to have a wonderful choir.

What do conservatives do, send “tasters” out to various parishes?

Yes, it might mean they take their lay vocation seriously. Only a conservative would instinctively assume, sight unseen, that if the parish has reflected on their lay vocation, it must have done something wrong. Jansenism lives!!!

Bible Study? Sounds rather post-Counciliar.

I once asked a conservative friend if he would join me for our parish Corpus Christi procession. He declined, saying he wasn’t comfortable walking through our neighborhood as it was too ‘colorful’, if you know what I mean.

My parish has both as a sign of the seemless garment of Catholic social concerns.

No collar; those funny brown robes.

Well, we’re not like a nearby conservative parish where Father is carefully not to upset the rich white boys that pay for his vacation in San Juan every year by preaching social justice.
[/quote]

Since your so full of venom, maybe you should be a priestess. you lose , sorry


#13

[quote=netmilsmom]I saw this on another website, I loved it! It’s from Crisis Magazine so it may not be for the more Liberal of us…

  1. There is at least one daily Mass. check

  2. Confession is offered for a set time… check

  3. The tabernacle is inside the main church… check

  4. The church has kneelers. check

  5. The church doesn’t have a sign in the front that describes itself
    as a “Catholic Community.” not certain, although I was given this title to include in new website (argh, I brought it to his attention, Pastor agrees and would like to see it returned to “parish”)

  6. As you enter the church, you see people in the pews in prayer… check.

  7. The Mass is not intentionally altered through the use of
    inclusive language. check

  8. The Mass is said according to the General Instruction of the
    Roman Missal and the instructions of the local bishop. check

  9. The gospel is not being read, nor the homily given, by someone
    other than a priest or deacon. check

  10. Latin has pride of place in the Mass. check

  11. The bread for the Eucharist isn’t made with added ingredients
    not allowed by the Church. check

  12. The liturgical music focuses on God … check

  13. Extraordinary ministers do not outnumber the parishioners.
    check

  14. If you’re able to find the mission statement of the parish (it’s
    often carried in the bulletin), make sure it says something about
    fidelity to the Magisterium of the Church. Don’t know the mission statement (good addition for the website! but would expect Magisterium to rank if current Pastor had anything to do with it’s writing).

  15. And while you’re thumbing through the bulletin, see if there are
    other good groups there, like the Knights of Columbus, Legion of
    Mary, St. Vincent de Paul, and Holy Name Society. A faithful Bible study group is also a great sign. Small Parish, KOC didn’t last, but we’re the home parish to one of the Nation’s first Catholic radio stations! We have some great people, each following their own vocations and apostolates and we have occational bible studies!

  16. The parish offers some form of Eucharistic adoration. Check

  17. The parish has an active Pro-Life ministry, as well as a
    ministry that cares for the poor. Too Small, see 15 above.

  18. The priest wears his collar. check

  19. The pastor isn’t afraid to preach on the tough issues: **:frowning: ** Pastor has all the correct opinions, but I think he must be tired of getting beat up. He doesn’t say enough, or even much, from the pulpit on controversial issues.

  20. The parish’s marriage preparation program includes instruction
    in Natural Family Planning (NFP). check

  21. The church has a vibrant religious education program for both
    children and adults based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church. check (as much as possible for a small parish).

  22. The church’s Website doesn’t link to dissident groups… check

  23. If there’s a literature rack in the church, look at the
    publications the parish is carrying. check

[/quote]

We’re doing pretty well if you ask me, especially if you take into account that we’re in California, the supposed home of fruits and nuts! :slight_smile:

I’m so glad the Holy Spirit brought me here to return to my faith. I shudder to think what would have happened to me if I’d explored returning to Catholicism and been in a liberal parish. I doubt I would have found my way back home, as I would have smelled a rat in a liberal parish, but I would have thought it was the Catholicism and not realized the source of the error.

God Bless the infinite wisdom of God Himself! (can he do that?)

Well then, Thanks be to God!

CARose


#14

[quote=katherine2] Well, we’re not like a nearby conservative parish where Father is carefully not to upset the rich white boys that pay for his vacation in San Juan every year by preaching social justice.
[/quote]

WOW! I am credulous that you used the term “white boys”! I am even more blown away that you think a Holy Priest is just out for the money. There are good priests and bad. Not all conserrvative priests are the bad and it is amazing that you would think so.

This week we start the Novena to the Miraculous Metal. I am praying for those who have gone astray while still thinking they are Good Catholics. Some people need it.


#15

[quote=Franciscum]So you are a racist as well? Why do you dump your bitter venom on these threads?
[/quote]

BHAHAHA. I was sailing through this thread and reading a post. As soon as I saw the particular language I thought “Must be Katherine2!” I was right. Yikes Katherine, you sound so hostile. Take a deep breath…

Lisa N


#16

“Rich White Boys?”. That sounds very very racist to me, I am white and not rich and I take offense to that statement. I thought liberals as yourself see no color…Oh I forgot , that is only when they are pushing us middle class white people and forced busing on us, like the Kennedy’s in Boston preaching about love and integration while they go back to their mansion on Martha’s vineyard. I have yet to find one white liberal who lives in a ghetto, amazing to me

[quote=katherine2]At my (progressive) parish we also pray the Liturgy of the Hours as the Council asked.

We make both available. People take confession seriously. Unlike before the Council where more than four minutes in the confessional resulting in people thinking you fell asleep, we take about 15 minutes a person.

In my parish we have done a good job in promoting the genuflection as a eucharistic devotion and not just a habit, so you don’t see people genuflecting to St. Therese.

Of course, those who go around visiting parishes with little notebooks so they can make their reports on all their shortcomings are probably too distracted to notice even the most obvious placement.

We call ourselves a church not because we like “churchy” words. We believe our community is a true particular church. Not some administrative subdivison of the diocese that is just a place the bishop finds convienent to have Mass said. Needless so say, we empathize with those in Boston who are having their church suppressed.

And certainly we are not a place for someone looking for a closed, exclusive, uncaring and unsharing unrelated amalgamation of people.

Bingo is soooo old Catholic.

The fact you have accepted the term inclusive language shows we won this war, we are just waiting to finalize the terms of surrender.

Unlike conservative parishes were if the issue is money, all of suddden this rule gets set aside, our parish lay leaders regularly address us at the end of Mass.

No problem there. And not that tired, monotone, mumbled, mispronounced latin conservatives like. We have an active, engaged, participating laity which allows us to have a wonderful choir.

What do conservatives do, send “tasters” out to various parishes?

Yes, it might mean they take their lay vocation seriously. Only a conservative would instinctively assume, sight unseen, that if the parish has reflected on their lay vocation, it must have done something wrong. Jansenism lives!!!

Bible Study? Sounds rather post-Counciliar.

I once asked a conservative friend if he would join me for our parish Corpus Christi procession. He declined, saying he wasn’t comfortable walking through our neighborhood as it was too ‘colorful’, if you know what I mean.

My parish has both as a sign of the seemless garment of Catholic social concerns.

No collar; those funny brown robes.

Well, we’re not like a nearby conservative parish where Father is carefully not to upset the rich white boys that pay for his vacation in San Juan every year by preaching social justice.
[/quote]


#17

[quote=Franciscum] Why do you dump your bitter venom on these threads?
[/quote]

Oh, Franciscum, it make all the honey that come from you all the more sweeter:D


#18

[quote=netmilsmom]I am even more blown away that you think a Holy Priest is just out for the money. There are good priests and bad. Not all conserrvative priests are the bad and it is amazing that you would think so.

[/quote]

netmismon,

You post a 23 points blasting and belitting priests and parishes on everything you think they are doing wrong, and then you are blown away that I make a negative reference about one particular priest (who in charity, I don’t indentify)? Get a grip, girl!

Spend less time thinking any parish that has a mission statement is a step away from heresy and more time focused on things that matter.


#19

[quote=CrusaderNY] I have yet to find one white liberal who lives in a ghetto, amazing to me
[/quote]

Yes you have, at least electronicly.


#20

[quote=katherine2]netmismon,

You post a 23 points blasting and belitting priests and parishes on everything you think they are doing wrong, and then you are blown away that I make a negative reference about one particular priest (who in charity, I don’t indentify)? Get a grip, girl!

Spend less time thinking any parish that has a mission statement is a step away from heresy and more time focused on things that matter.
[/quote]

No dear woman. I posted a part of an article from Crisis magazine, I did not come up with it myself. This is at the top of the thread.

I have an adopted sister who is African/American and my husband has two nieces who are half. All of them know and have conveyed to me, that to call a man a “boy” is an insult. At your age, you should know better. You are insulting and crass. There is no charity about your post, if you posted the priest’s name, you would be open to a law suit.

I have two sisters who are self serving Liberals. Bigots in the first degree, when it comes to a disagreement with their beliefs.

Don’t fool yourself.


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