2nd Successor of Peter, Anacletus (Cletus)


#1

This thread is to discuss Succession of Popes after Peter.

We will start with the first 3.

From the Catholic Encyclopedia.

St. Linus (67-76)
St. Anacletus (Cletus) (76-88)
St. Clement I (88-97)

From Wikipedia

Linus
Anacletus (Cletus)
Clement

The question is concerning the 2nd Successor of Peter, Pope Anacletus (Cletus). There are scholars who argue that Anacletus and Cletus are different persons base on “Catalogus Liberianus”, the “Carmen contra Marcionem” and the “Liber Pontificalis.”

The Catholic Encyclopedia states the following:

This name is only another form for Anacletus, the second successor of St. Peter. It is true that the Liberian Catalogue, a fourth-century list of popes, so called because it ends with Pope Liberius (d. 366), contains both names, as if they were different persons. But this is an error, owing evidently to the existence of two forms of the same name, one an abbreviation of the other. In the aforesaid catalogue the papal succession is: Petrus, Linus, Clemens, Cletus, Anacletus. This catalogue, however, is the only authority previous to the sixth century (Liber Pontificalis) for distinguishing two popes under the names of Cletus and Anacletus.

The “Carmen adv. Marcionem” is of the latter half of the fourth century, and its papal list probably depends on the Liberian Catalogue. The “Martyrologium Hieronymianum” (q.v.) mentions both “Aninclitus” and “Clitus” (23 and 31 December), but on each occasion these names are found in a list of popes; hence the days mentioned cannot be looked on as specially consecrated to these two persons. Apart from these lists, all other ancient papal lists, from the second to the fourth century, give as follows the immediate succession of St. Peter: Linos, Anegkletos, Klemes (Linus, Anencletus, Clemens), and this succession is certainly the right one. It is that found in St. Iren�us and in the chronicles of the second and third centuries. Both Africa and the Orient adhered faithfully to this list, which is also given in the very ancient Roman Canon of the Mass, except that in the latter Cletus is the form used, and the same occurs in St. Epiphanius, St. Jerome, Rufinus, and in many fifth- and sixth-century lists. This second successor of St. Peter governed the Roman Church from about 76 to about 88. The “Liber Pontificalis” says that his father was Emelianus and that Cletus was a Roman by birth, and belonged to the quarter known as the Vicus Patrici. It also tells us that he ordained twenty-five priests, and was buried in Vaticano near the body of St. Peter.

The question is, is Cletus and Anacletus the same person? According the sources I stated, they are. Then how do you explain those conflicting views?
newadvent.org/cathen/04054a.htm


#2

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