3 Questions...

  1. What is the Catholic view of the Second Coming? Protestants view of the “rapture” is what I believed before I converted. But what do we believe as Catholics?

  2. Did Mother Mary die before She was Assumed?

  3. If so, was Her final resting place in the House in Turkey or was She buried in the Tomb in Jerusalem?

I know they don’t go together but I figured I’d get some other peoples input.

Also, when praying a Hail Mary, is it “blessed art thou among” or “blessed art thou amongst”?

We believe that Jesus will return to judge the living and the dead. We believe in a resurrection of the dead and life in the world to come.

  1. Did Mother Mary die before She was Assumed?

Unknown. The Church states that when her day here were fulfilled she was Assumed into heaven. You are free to believe either way.

  1. If so, was Her final resting place in the House in Turkey or was She buried in the Tomb in Jerusalem?

Neither since she was Assumed into heaven.

So by what it says in the Nicene Creed we will be risen from the ground bodily and reunited with our souls? That would be like what the Assumption is if Mother did die. Also, when I said final resting place, I did not mean a FINAL final place. I meant where She was before Her Assumption. Sone claim she died and/or fell asleep in the House in Turkey and was Assumed or She had died and/or fell asleep and was laid in a Tomb in Jerusalem and was Assumed from their. I believe that’s what I read. I’m trying to get a better understanding of it. If She had not died, the House would seem more appropriate as a place to rest before being taken by God to Heaven… wouldn’t it? Since Mother was free from original sin how could she have died?

Yes

Also, when I said final resting place, I did not mean a FINAL final place. I meant where She was before Her Assumption.

I knew what you meant and I was being cutesy. Sorry.

Sone claim she died and/or fell asleep in the House in Turkey and was Assumed or She had died and/or fell asleep and was laid in a Tomb in Jerusalem and was Assumed from their. I believe that’s what I read. I’m trying to get a better understanding of it. If She had not died, the House would seem more appropriate as a place to rest before being taken by God to Heaven… wouldn’t it? Since Mother was free from original sin how could she have died?

Perhaps you would be interested in The Blessed Virgin Mary article from the Catholic Encyclopedia which discusses this issue and gives the pro’s and con’s.

No need for apologies! That article looks very interesting at a glance. I will have to read more in depth.

On to the Hail Mary… I want to learn it in Latin, but it translates to “amongst” women from what I’ve read. I always thought it was “among” women… help!!! :slight_smile:

Among and amongst are two forms of the same word.

ICXC NIKA

I have always seen it as among.

I did find this
Among is the earlier word of this pair: according to the Oxford English Dictionary, it first appeared in Old English. The variant form, amongst, is a later development, coming along in the Middle English period. With regard to their meanings, there’s no difference between among and amongst. They’re both prepositions which mean:
•situated in the middle of a group of people or things:
The Catholic Encyclopedia has amongst.
This of course is the salutation that Elizabeth greeted Mary. The translations of the bibles I consulted all use the word among. As they mean the same thing, don’t think it makes a difference.
The Greek word that is used is en which according to the source I am usingnis a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest

Thank you so much for your answers. May Mothers Grace be upon you. In Christ, through Mother Mary.

Catechism

974 The Most Blessed Virgin Mary, when the course of her earthly life was completed, was taken up body and soul into the glory of heaven, where she already shares in the glory of her Son’s Resurrection, anticipating the resurrection of all members of his Body.


The apostles were weeping. They were losing their Mother, and they would miss her horribly even though they knew that she was tired, that she was ready to go home to Heaven. They stood around her as she lay on her bed, grieving and listening to her final words of wisdom. They were all there, Peter, James, John, Matthew, Andrew, Philip, Bartholmew, Simon, Jude, James, and Matthias, all except Thomas. He alone was missing, still on his journey to his Mother’s house, hoping and praying to get there in time.

He did not. By the time Thomas arrived, Mary was in the tomb. He must have been devastated, for he hadn’t gotten the chance to see her one last time. He begged the others to open the tomb that he might at least gaze upon her face. They pitied him…and agreed.

When the apostles opened the tomb, their mouths dropped open in shock. Mary’s body was gone! In its place were flowers, dozens and dozens of flowers. Some versions of the story say that the tomb was filled with roses; others say lilies. Whatever the case, Mary had given her spiritual sons, especially Thomas, a beautiful, fragrant gift to comfort them.

Mary was also giving the apostles, and her spiritual children of all ages, a special reminder about who she is. Flowers have symbolic meanings. Roses, especially red roses, symbolize love. The Immaculate Mary’s love was and is inferior only to that of God. Lilies symbolize purity, chastity, and virtue. Mary surpasses all other human beings in these characteristics. As the sinless Mother of God, she is perfectly pure and perfectly chaste. Her countless virtues shine brighter than the stars.

It is fitting, then, that the apostles would be greeted with flowers when they opened Mary’s tomb. Her body was no longer there. She had been assumed body and soul into Heaven to be with her divine Son, and she now rules as Queen of Heaven and Earth. But she left behind a special message of love.

Pray for us, Holy Mary, Mother God, most pure, most holy, most loving.


I think she died in Bethlehem.

Turkey didn’t exist then.

To be clear this is a pious legend.

I think she died in Bethlehem.

Turkey didn’t exist then.

We’re being cutesy again because of course the land is there no matter what it is called:p

The place that is mentioned is Ephesus which was according to an unrecognized vision of Anne Catherine Emmerich, was the place Mary lived with the Apostle John.

:smiley:

  1. There are two views on the matter. One, referred to as amillenialism, holds that the millennium began with the atonement, and that the final battle at the end of the millennium is the tribulation itself. At the end of the tribulation Jesus Christ will come down from Heaven and the end of time will be at hand.

The other view, called postmillenialism, holds that at the end of the tribulation, Jesus Christ will destroy the wicked and usher in a thousand years (or some other extremely long time) of natural paradise, during which he will still be in Heaven. At the end of this period, the final battle will ensue, followed by the final judgment.

  1. Yes.

  2. Where she died is unknown.

I love Mary, sometimes I don’t feel close to her.

I need to change that.

vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/encyclicals/documents/hf_jp-ii_enc_25031987_redemptoris-mater_en.html

Here’s an old article by Jimmy Akin that’s a brief intro to this: web.archive.org/web/20061018220620/http://www.catholic.com/library/Rapture.asp

Here’s some audio resources:

catholic.com/radio/shows/does-the-bible-teach-the-rapture-4944

catholic.com/radio/shows/refuting-the-rapture-encore-3835

Will Catholics Be Left Behind? ewtn.com/vondemand/audio/dload1.asp?audiofile=el_10082003.mp3&source=seriessearchprog.asp&seriesID=6695&T1=

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.