475th Anniversary of Augsburg Confession


#1

Hello Everyone!
In honor of the 475th Anniversary year of the presentation of the Augsburg Confession, I was curious as to how many of you have read it. I was also curious if there are any major, history altering peices of Catholic literature that could be equated to it? Where could I get a copy? As is, the only distincly Catholic literature I own is your Catechism.
God’s Blessings,
Lutheran Student


#2

[quote=LutheranStudent]Hello Everyone!
In honor of the 475th Anniversary year of the presentation of the Augsburg Confession, I was curious as to how many of you have read it. I was also curious if there are any major, history altering peices of Catholic literature that could be equated to it? Where could I get a copy? As is, the only distincly Catholic literature I own is your Catechism.
God’s Blessings,
Lutheran Student
[/quote]

Hello LS, I have read it as well as many other of his writings. I’m not so sure I would celebrate the division of Gods Church. A distinctly Catholic piece which altered history? Sure, and I’d recommend it so much more highly than any writings of Luther, it’s the New Testament. Read and enjoy the Word of God.
May the peace and love of our Lord, Jesus the Christ, be with you,
Tom


#3

Something comparable would be the decrees of the various Ecumenical Councils throughout church history, especially the Council of Trent. Many of these can be found online in the Document Library at www.ewtn.com


#4

Hi Tom,

I’m sorry you feel that way. I see the Augsburg Confession as a unique preservation and re-establishment of the truth, while truth was struggling to survive. As a matter of honesty I have to tell you that I believe you are lying to me. Anyone who has read the Augsburg Confession would have realized fairly quickly that it was not written by Martin Luther. Rather, it was primarily written by Phillip Melancthon and several other theologians with the encouragement of the Lutheran princes of Germany.
On the other note - you claim that the New Testament is a “distinctly” Catholic book. If your claim is true, then I must be a Catholic because I can find nothing wrong in it. Let’s discuss the New Testament, since this is the book we both agree on. Let’s discuss the veneration of Mary and salvation through works. Let’s discuss the authority of the papacy. These are the things that are “distinctly Catholic,” and I find none of them in the New Testament.

Lutheran Student


#5

Thank you, Todd. I acctually began reading the from the Council of Trent at one point, but never finished. I might take it up again and see what I can get out of it.

-Lutheran Student


#6

[quote=LutheranStudent] Let’s discuss the veneration of Mary and salvation through works. Let’s discuss the authority of the papacy. These are the things that are “distinctly Catholic,” and I find none of them in the New Testament.

Lutheran Student
[/quote]

The first point can be discussed. If you failed to find the latter two, I don’t think you looked very hard.


#7

You won’t find the Trinity in the NT either. Nor was it readily inferred, as early heresies such as Arianism showed.

The veneration of Mary has been extensively covered here on the forum: you might want to look at some of the pre-existing threads, and by so doing come up with specific questions.

The papacy is certainly found in the NT—perhaps it would be good to read Matthew 16:18. This short article might help: catholic.com/library/Peter_and_the_Papacy.asp

Also, read Isaiah 22:22 for an OT explanation of the keys given to Peter later in that passage.

If you are thinking that Catholics believe in salvation by works alone, you are wrong: that is an early heresy known as Pelagianism and is not the Catholic position. Just so you know…

It might be best for you to take each of these items and start a thread on each one.


#8

That’s becaue you have an obvious bias to your own faith ideas. It’s all there - plain as the nose on your face only you choose not to see it or deny the interpretation taught by the Apostles, early christians, the ECF and the Doctors of the Church - which would be the Catholic Church.


#9

Lutheran, do you celebrate Christmas, because it isn´t in the Bible!.


#10

[quote=LutheranStudent]I was also curious if there are any major, history altering peices of Catholic literature that could be equated to it?
[/quote]

Pornography is history altering literature too - it has done a lot of damage to civilization.

I know this will be difficult for you to understand, but the encyclical by John Paul II Fides et Ratio is more profound in its relevance, reach, and depth than the entire corpus of Mister Luther’s publications.

I appreciate some aspects of the protestant doctrine as emphasizing the existential confrontation by which one must submit to God’s grace. But I owe it to you to say that you are running on 2 cylinders when you could be running on all 8.


#11

I would also recommend reading Trent, as it will show the true position of the Catholic Church regarding Justification.

It is not a works based salvation, it just is a clarification which states that it isn’t just a assent of faith that saves you, by grace.

There is plenty of very good Catholic literature out there and if you would like some recommendations we will be glad to comply.

God Bless
Scylla


#12

[quote=LutheranStudent]Hi Tom,

On the other note - you claim that the New Testament is a “distinctly” Catholic book. If your claim is true, then I must be a Catholic because I can find nothing wrong in it. Let’s discuss the New Testament, since this is the book we both agree on. Let’s discuss the veneration of Mary and salvation through works. Let’s discuss the authority of the papacy. These are the things that are “distinctly Catholic,” and I find none of them in the New Testament.

Lutheran Student
[/quote]

The authority of the papacy is rooted in the New Testament. We refer to the following verses:
Mt. 16:18
Mt. 16:19
Lk 22:32
Jn 21:17
Mk 16:7
Lk 24:34
Acts: 1:13-26, 2:14, 2:41, 3:6-7, 5:1-11, 8:21, 10:44-46, 15:7, 15:19

Now that’s just to start. We do not (and never have) believed that good works alone gets someone into heaven, any more than Catholics believe that faith ALONE is enough to get one into heaven. As the Bible clearly states in James: faith without works is dead.

We love Jesus’ mother, Mary, because He gave her to us and because the Bible states that she is 'most blessed among women" and that “all generations will call me blessed”. This can be found in the Bible.

I hope this helps. And, I do think Tom kind of landed on you with both feet. That wasn’t very nice.


#13

Are altar calls in the bible?


#14

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