4th of july mass! Liturgical dancers

Today at the special July 4th mass, there were women dressed in short skirts, independence day theme, like Uncle Sam. The danced the offertory up to the priest, who was wearing a red-white-blue vestment.
The music was all Your a grand ol’flag, etc…
The processional hymn was the National Anthem.
Pretty cool, but I didn’t like our female state representitive giving the homily.

There’s enough liturgical abuses here to keep your diocese chancery busy.

Abuses from what you described:

Liturgical dance

Vestment colors…color of the day (green) or a saint’s day (white), Mass for the U.S.A. (white)

Your State Represtitive giving the Homily.
The Ordained Minister (Bishop, Priest, or Deacon) can give the Homily.

I am sure others attending my be offended by this because it does not follow the GIRM.

A note on the Liturgical Dancing…In Africa, there is regular dancing at the offerory, as this is the way that the people in Zimbabwe show their joy! would this be classed as a litugical abuse.

[quote=kxaddiso]A note on the Liturgical Dancing…In Africa, there is regular dancing at the offerory, as this is the way that the people in Zimbabwe show their joy! would this be classed as a litugical abuse.
[/quote]

If the culture uses dancing as a way of celebration, then it is not. The Church allows cultural expression.

In the U.S., dance here is looked down because of the possible social ramifications it could suggest. Dancing is more of a social event than a religious one.

[quote=mgy100]Today at the special July 4th mass, there were women dressed in short skirts, independence day theme, like Uncle Sam. The danced the offertory up to the priest, who was wearing a red-white-blue vestment.
The music was all Your a grand ol’flag, etc…
The processional hymn was the National Anthem.
Pretty cool, but I didn’t like our female state representitive giving the homily.
[/quote]

This is the type of Mass I would walk out on.

PF

[quote=mgy100]Today at the special July 4th mass, there were women dressed in short skirts, independence day theme, like Uncle Sam. The danced the offertory up to the priest, who was wearing a red-white-blue vestment.
The music was all Your a grand ol’flag, etc…
The processional hymn was the National Anthem.
Pretty cool, but I didn’t like our female state representitive giving the homily.
[/quote]

See Virginia Stefano

Say it isn’t so.

Time to find another parish.

And to drop off a nice little letter to the parish office, explaining your decision to leave and why, along with a comment that if they ever decide to re-join the Catholic Church and get a Catholic priest as a pastor, you might be back.

I am just home from my TLM parish where we also had a special Independence Day mass; however, ours was not like mgy 100’s. It was a requiem mass honoring all the military who have given their lives to preserve freedom–including today’s war in Iraq. As Father said, we can disagree on today’s war but we cannot disagree to pray for our military that have lost their lives in the conflict.

When did they shoot off the fireworks :slight_smile:

[quote=mgy100]Today at the special July 4th mass, there were women dressed in short skirts, independence day theme, like Uncle Sam. The danced the offertory up to the priest, who was wearing a red-white-blue vestment.
The music was all Your a grand ol’flag, etc…
The processional hymn was the National Anthem.
Pretty cool, but I didn’t like our female state representitive giving the homily.
[/quote]

I would have just walked out.

[quote=mgy100]Today at the special July 4th mass, there were women dressed in short skirts, independence day theme, like Uncle Sam. The danced the offertory up to the priest, who was wearing a red-white-blue vestment.
The music was all Your a grand ol’flag, etc…
The processional hymn was the National Anthem.
Pretty cool, but I didn’t like our female state representitive giving the homily.
[/quote]

What I paste below covers just the Homily from the 2003 GIRM

The Homily

  1. The homily is part of the Liturgy and is strongly recommended,63 for it is necessary for the nurturing of the Christian life. It should be an exposition of some aspect of the readings from Sacred Scripture or of another text from the Ordinary or from the Proper of the Mass of the day and should take into account both the mystery being celebrated and the particular needs of the listeners.64

  2. The Homily should ordinarily be given by the priest celebrant himself. He may entrust it to a concelebrating priest or occasionally, according to circumstances, to the deacon, but never to a lay person.65 In particular cases and for a just cause, the homily may even be given by a Bishop or a priest who is present at the celebration but cannot concelebrate.

Add to that further words from Redemptionis Sacramentum written in 2004. Note that the first sentence addresses the Homily within the Mass. The rest of it is addressing lay people preaching outside of the Mass and even that is really limited.

[left]2. Preaching[/left]

[161.] As was already noted above, the homily on account of its importance and its nature is reserved to the Priest or Deacon during Mass.[260] As regards other forms of preaching, if necessity demands it in particular circumstances, or if usefulness suggests it in special cases, lay members of Christ’s faithful may be allowed to preach in a church or in an oratory outside Mass in accordance with the norm of law.[261] This may be done only on account of a scarcity of sacred ministers in certain places, in order to meet the need, and it may not be transformed from an exceptional measure into an ordinary practice, nor may it be understood as an authentic form of the advancement of the laity.[262] All must remember besides that the faculty for giving such permission belongs to the local Ordinary, and this as regards individual instances; this permission is not the competence of anyone else, even if they are Priests or Deacons.

Then, please be mindful of this in Redemptionis Sacramentum:

[left]6. Complaints Regarding Abuses in Liturgical Matters[/left]

[183.] In an altogether particular manner, let everyone do all that is in their power to ensure that the Most Holy Sacrament of the Eucharist will be protected from any and every irreverence or distortion and that all abuses be thoroughly corrected. This is a most serious duty incumbent upon each and every one, and all are bound to carry it out without any favouritism.

[184.] Any Catholic, whether Priest or Deacon or lay member of Christ’s faithful, has the right to lodge a complaint regarding a liturgical abuse to the diocesan Bishop or the competent Ordinary equivalent to him in law, or to the Apostolic See on account of the primacy of the Roman Pontiff.[290] It is fitting, however, insofar as possible, that the report or complaint be submitted first to the diocesan Bishop. This is naturally to be done in truth and charity.

While you are not required to talk to the priest himself, it could help. But if you can’t do that, write the Bishop, then follow through with the CDW. If you are interested in how to do that, people here can give you addresses.

Note that it states it is a duty to report such abuse. So don’t feel bad about lodging a complaint.

[quote=mgy100]Today at the special July 4th mass, there were women dressed in short skirts, independence day theme, like Uncle Sam. The danced the offertory up to the priest, who was wearing a red-white-blue vestment.
The music was all Your a grand ol’flag, etc…
The processional hymn was the National Anthem.
Pretty cool, but I didn’t like our female state representitive giving the homily.
[/quote]

Are you sure this was a mass? Please write about this to your bishop immediately!
[list]
*]only the priest or ordained deacon can give a homily
*]only designated vestments are approved for clergy conducting mass
*]liturgy has approved songs, but most diocese have not followed these firmly…however…yours sounds extreme.
*]short (immodest?) skitrs on the alter before the Eucharist seems sacrireligious to me!
[/list]You are doing a disservice to the entire Catholic community if you do not tell you bishop exactly what happened. In your letter, as him to explain to you why such things are occuring and allowed to occur. After all, he is your shephard!

Bless you!
Bob

[quote=mgy100]Today at the special July 4th mass, there were women dressed in short skirts, independence day theme, like Uncle Sam. The danced the offertory up to the priest, who was wearing a red-white-blue vestment.
The music was all Your a grand ol’flag, etc…
The processional hymn was the National Anthem.
Pretty cool, but I didn’t like our female state representitive giving the homily.
[/quote]

Please tell me you’re joking and if not in what diocese did this happen in?

[quote=Edwin1961]If the culture uses dancing as a way of celebration, then it is not. The Church allows cultural expression.

In the U.S., dance here is looked down because of the possible social ramifications it could suggest. Dancing is more of a social event than a religious one.
[/quote]

I believe the latest from the Vatican is that Liturgical dancing is not authorized. There was a post from Francis Cardinal Arinze to that effect that was posted here a short while back. It doesn’t matter if it is done in Africa or the United States. It is not authorized.

As far as the 4th of July Mass, red white and blue vestments, dancers, representatives giving homilies are and just more examples of how much we have denigrated the Mass and how little faith is really left in some places.

COR JESU SACRATISIMUM MISERERE NOBIS

Golly, this is just what we need to attract the EO back.

Our parish had a Baptist minister and part of his congregation join us in the Liturgy of the Holy Mass for our 4th of July celebration.

The Baptist members were mainly in the choir. Because of this the choir sounded more “full bodied” and terrific.

The Baptist minister was dressed in a black gown with a crimson-red stole around his neck and walked in alongside the lector behind a group of boyscouts from our parish.

Behind these two groups were our Pastor and Associate Pastor. Our Pastor’s vestment was white with a red, wide stripe running from the neckline to the hemline. The Associate Pastor was dressed in white only.

There were 4 altar servers dressed in black and white: 2 boys and 2 girls. During the entire Mass, when standing next to the altar, they had their hands folded, like how sometimes angels are depicted, as if in prayer.

The Baptist minister read the second Epistle. He and the lector were seated next to each other on the altar podium. Before the consecration, the lector returned to his pew, but the Baptist minister remained in his chair. At consecration, he got off his chair and knelt down till the start of the distribution of Holy Communion. At the consecration one of the servers rang the bell. Gold vessels were used for the distribution of the Eucharist.

Just before the final blessing, the Baptist minister gave his sermon on Liberty and how it originates with God. His talk was intertwined with many bible quotations on the subject of the different kinds of Liberty. He said he was honored and extremely glad to have been invited to join our parish in our 4th of July celebration.

Then came the final blessing and as the procession exited the church building, all sang God Bless America, in its entirety.

[quote=mgy100]The music was all Your a grand ol’flag, etc…
The processional hymn was the National Anthem.
Pretty cool…
[/quote]

Pope St. Pius X:

“That the State must be separated from the Church is a thesis absolutely false, a most pernicious error. Based, as it is, on the principle that the State must not recognize any religious cult, it is in the first place guilty of a great injustice to God; for the Creator of man is also the Founder of human societies, and preserves their existence as He preserves our own. We owe Him, therefore, not only a private cult, but a public and social worship to honor Him. Besides, this thesis is an obvious negation of the supernatural order…”

Well, I’ve always said that I would never walk out on a Mass, but this one may have done it for me. I’ll pray for your priest.

Like our glorious Pope said in the Ratzinger Report - Solemnity, rather than triumphalism should be the mood at mass. He also said that a great form of active participation is silence.

[quote=mgy100]Today at the special July 4th mass, there were women dressed in short skirts, independence day theme, like Uncle Sam. The danced the offertory up to the priest, who was wearing a red-white-blue vestment.
The music was all Your a grand ol’flag, etc…
The processional hymn was the National Anthem.
Pretty cool, but I didn’t like our female state representitive giving the homily.
[/quote]

And let me guess, your state rep is pro-abortion? That would be the frosting on the cake, so to speak…

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