80% of California is now in extreme drought, new data show


#1

latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-california-extreme-drought-data-20140717-story.html

Drought buster patrols the streets of Los Angeles

dailynews.com/general-news/20140716/drought-buster-patrols-the-streets-of-los-angeles

Wasting water? Fear ratting neighbors, not relentless cops

sfgate.com/news/article/Little-enforcement-of-new-water-rules-planned-5629287.php


#2

Surely a sign of “the End Times” :eek:


#3

Good thing it rained this morning at my place.


#4

“Without a few successive winters of above-average precipitation, we have only enough water in storage to get through the next 12 to 18 months, and that’s it.”

news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/07/140715-connecting-the-dots-california-drought-earthquakes-storms/

Not funny :confused:


#5

“This time-delay scheme has been successful until now, but long-term studies indicate that snowpack is slowly shrinking across the region as the snow season shortens and runoff occurs earlier in spring. Climate forecasts—including the recently released National Climate Assessment—indicate that the Southwest can expect shrinking snowpacks, rising temperatures, more evaporation, and reduced streamflows. The number of wildfires also is expected to rise as rain, snow, and soil moisture decline.”

“We must begin to manage down our water demand in this already overtaxed and drying landscape, or we should not be surprised if nature does it for us.”


#6

Seems like with all the natural disasters CA is prone to, especially earthquake central, knowing its a matter of when before ‘the big one’ hits southern CA and wipes out everything, mud slides, fires, droughts, etc. cost of living would be one of the cheapest in the country, but its the opposite, its close to being the most expensive place to live…I wonder why?


#7

THE WEATHER. When the rest of the country is shoveling snow, we are surfing and riding our dune buggies in the sand. You have to pay for that.


#8

Weather is but a small contributor to an areas cost of living though, more important things trump weather.


#9

Question: why isn’t there a larger effort in desalination in the dry areas of our country? I realize it is costly, yet with the oceans sitting there, why not use that?


#10

They don’t consider more expensive options until the less expensive is off the table.

Until recently this idea was the more expensive option.


#11

I love the winter so i would rather live in Ohio than in California but that’s just me.


#12

California cannabis growers may be making millions, but their thirsty plants are sucking up a priceless resource: water. Now scientists say that if no action is taken in the drought-wracked state, the consequences for fisheries and wildlife will be dire.

cnbc.com/id/101816232


#13

Actually, in Texas, we are already starting this progress, even though it is more expensive. We have deemed a little foresight is worth the cost. Once the rain comes, it is too late to patch the roof.


#14

Takes people awhile to learn things, and even when they do, sometimes politicians block sensible actions.

I don’t claim to be an expert on the subject, I only know what works in my part of the country and what doesn’t. Right now, we’re under El Nino conditions. That always makes it cooler and wetter here, and that’s what we have. I have observed over the years that the effect in California is the exact opposite.

Interestingly, though people might do it later, right now ranchers here are not increasing their herds. Previously, all it took was a high return cycle for them to do it. But this time, they’re not doing it. Have they perhaps finally learned that the “down” part of the cycle (like 2011 and 2012) needs to determine numbers instead of the “up” part (like now)?

We’ll see, I guess.

And so, should California look at the present situation and adapt to it as a permanent thing, even when better water conditions prevail? It would seem the wise course.


#15

I wonder how much water all the tobacco fields drink up to feed the smoking habits of people? Maybe they need to prioritize and make sure other things get water before tobacco plants?!


#16

Do they even grow tobacco in California?

On a similar note, during the Texas drought, many ranchers had to kill off herds because of water. We were about a year from eliminating water for beef in parts of central Texas. So I take back about what I said about having foresight. We had a scare and are taking actions to prevent a repeat.


#17

Here’s an idea: stop growing alfalfa for dairy cows in the desert and grow climate - appropriate crops there instead. There’s plenty of land in Wisconsin to be the dairy for the whole country (and that needs ZERO irrigation), but federally subsidized water projects in California have been putting WI dairies out of business for decades now.

Stupid Americans. :wink:


#18

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