8th Grade Catechism


#1

I saw in the Sunday bulletin that our parish was looking for Catechism teachers. In fact I saw this three weeks in a row and thought “why not?”

So I called and left voice messages as the RE Office apparently does not have regular summer hours. I also sent a few emails. No response. So then I sent an email to the Monsignor a few days ago, figuring he would “jump” on a new volunteer.

Today in the mail I got a hand written note from the DRE asking if I was still interested and explaining that she had called and left messages (?).

At any rate, does anyone out there have any experience (good or bad) that they woujld like to share, or advice etc?. I know that when my children went through our CCD program (12 and 3 years ago), they attended a particular Mass and afterwards had 90 minutes of classroom. 8th graders in our parish receive the sacrament of confirmation.

Thanks.


#2

Teaching the youth is a tremendous opportunity. Jump and take it if you are in the state of grace and excited about the faith.


#3

I taught 7th and 8th grade for several years while our children were that age. It’s a great opportunity to guide growing Christians.

Added benefit: Any one who teaches 7th or 8th grade gets 2 years off of Purgatory for each year they teach. :smiley:


#4

I have been teaching 6th grade (Confirmation) for 7 years. Every year I ask myself why am I here and every year I am back because I know it is where God is asking me to use my passion to reach out and help our parents educate their children. If you are being called to use your gifts here please go for it.

Not only do the kids need to have teachers who want to be there, they need to see men teaching. At our parish over 80% of the PREP teachers are female and God bless and love them for what they do, but our kids also need to see positive male role models of faithful Catholics (not perfect ones mind you) sharing their faith. And, I will wager a beer, you will learn as much this year from the kids as they learn from you.


#5

I have been a Confirmation catechist for 20+ years. I have used many various programs and materials at a number of parishes. For the past 12 years my parish has used a hybrid program that we have written and it is based on other programs but it is rooted is the Lectionary and social justice.


#6

Very much agreed. Also, I love your signature.

fastenatinguy, what I would say to you is, if you are a new teacher (especially), don’t worry about being nervous. Be comfortable being nervous. Manage the nerves, let them keep you on your toes to make you better. Over time, experience will soften the nerves.

Good luck!


#7

I'm taking over the confirmation classes at my parish this year, classes start in 10 days. The man whom I am taking over for taught for somewhere are 40 years...quite the shoes to fill, this guy was good at what he did.

I'm not really all that nervous about teaching the material, I'm comfortable with the theology and logic behind all of it. However, I am a bit shaky on how I will handle these kids (7th, 8th, 9th grades) on a disciplinary level. At registration just last week, there were a couple of students that seemed to radiate a negative attitude worse than that of the others...and her mother (who is apparently going to be one of my teacher's aids) did zero to correct it. In fact, and somewhat to my disappointment, her main concern was if I would allow the students to have snacks during class (not that it matters, but I'm against that notion).

I'll be the newest, youngest, and only male catechist at my parish. I'm an unmarried man with no children and subsequently no real experience with keeping kids in line. Several of the other veteran teachers have volunteered to come and set the students straight if they're misbehaving, but don't want that at all. Does anyone have any pointers about this subject?


#8

[quote="TheDoctor, post:4, topic:295704"]
Not only do the kids need to have teachers who want to be there, they need to see men teaching. At our parish over 80% of the PREP teachers are female and God bless and love them for what they do, but our kids also need to see positive male role models of faithful Catholics

[/quote]

My view exactly! I believe that society has put a stigma of sorts on men showing and sharing their faith, hence the lack of male role models sitting in the pews, in the classrooms and in the pulpit. If men would "man up", this country wouldn't be in the sorry state it is in today!


#9

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.