95 thesis


#1

I was reading on wiki that the Pope asked Luther to recant 41 points of the 95 thesis. Which 41 were they?


#2

The last sentence from an article at wiki on it is:
Pope Leo X wished for Martin Luther to recant 41 of these theses, which Luther famously refused to do before the Diet of Worms in 1521, thus symbolically initiating the Protestant reformation

Luther did not recant or repent, that’s what lead to his excommunication.


#3

Hi,
I have no idea but Im wondering if the CC changed the other 54 within the church. Or does the CC still disagree with all 95 points.


#4

The Church never disagreed with all 95. A good many are perfectly in line with Church teaching.


#5

Yet, when Luther was asked to recant of his writings at the Diet of Worms, he was asked by the Church to recant of all of his writings, wasn’t he?


#6

I have a copy of the thesis. All 95 seem reasonable to me. I feel that many corrupt individuals apposed them because it threatened thier power and position within the church.


#7

I’ve read it (them?) a few times. To me, it basically seems like 95 complaints all about one topic, the abuse of indulgences.


#8

Thought I knew my faith. Whats going on. I am lost with this one:mad:


#9

Hi,
I have not read them. What I understand that around 800 A.D. The RCC started to gain enormous power and well you know what happens when people or a group becomes too powerful.:stuck_out_tongue: Corruption sets in. It probably just snowballed over the centuries. When the thesis came out I think your right, the people in power said forget it we will lose too much power(pride). My youth minister said had the CC made the changes from within we would probably all be catholic.:thumbsup: We humans arent good at humbling ourselves and admitting mistakes.:frowning: Think about it, if you were that powerful, would you give it up–probably not:eek:


#10

Yep. I was really surprised when I first read them that they were all about the same thing.


#11

Yes, they pretty much are all about the abuse of indulgencies by the Church. They are not anti-Catholic. Read them yourself if you don’t believe me.

iclnet.org/pub/resources/text/wittenberg/luther/web/ninetyfive.html


#12

Luther tried to do a good thing, and was shot down by the RCC. :frowning:

(Corrupt people in the church made false claims about Luther, and caused this to happen - I mean.)


#13

I’d say he started out trying to do a good thing, but the Vatican’s slow response in addition to the resistance from the (corrupt) local clergy caused him to go in the wrong direction and start teaching that the Church hasn’t the authority to teach. He was excommunicated for teaching Sola Scriptura, not the 95 thesis.

(correct me if I’m wrong; I might have no idea what I’m talking about :whistle: )


#14

This is correct. Luther was a devout Catholic and a monk, as we all know. He recognized that the selling of indulgences was clearly an abuse. His goal was to literally reform the Church. The Church repeatedly refused to admit wrong and stop the abuse of power. As a result, Luther became obsessed with his own sinfullness and his own slavation. He lost faith in the Catholic Church and believed it could not be trusted, which is why he began to preach sola fide and sola scriptura. It was the repeated failure of the Catholic Church to admit wrong that drove Luther to initiate the split in the Church. That said, Luther’s intention was never to ‘throw out’ everything that was Catholic - however, over time that’s what has happened…


#15

You’re not entirely wrong. I heard that Martain Luther had authored something the Pope found offensive. The Pope issued a decree that all copies of the paper Luther wrote should be burned. Luther publically burned a copy of the Pope’s decree, and was excommunicated.

At least that’s what I heard.

I also heard that much of Luther’s writings had a lot of cursing. Could someone let me know more about this.


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