A.a.


#1

Does anyone out there have any opinion about Alcoholics Anonymous? I have been struggling with an escalating alcohol problem for the past year or so. I have finally gotten to the point that I feel that I need to seek help, what do you all think about AA? I am really afraid and ashamed that I have allowed myself to get into this predicament, and I am embarressed to talk to my pastor about it, we are new to our city and parish and I don’t want him to think badly about me or my family. Any advice?


#2

AA is a Christian founded self-help group for persons seeking to get and stay sober. It helps one to abstain from alcohol and learn to live life on life’s terms without the aid of alcohol. Locate a local meeting and find out for yourself what it has to offer you. I never heard of anyone doing worse because they attended an AA meeting.

God bless.


#3

It is not Christian-founded. It is not affiliated with any particular religion. It only teaches that seeking God will help. You may do best to find a group that meets in a church (they rent space).

Do not be ashamed to talk to your parish priest about it. They don’t bite, especially since being honest about the problem is the first step towards solving it. They deal with those issues all the time, particularly in the confessional, and some in their own lives. They also know about other community resources.


#4

I am a good friend who is an AA member. He has been sober for a long time-- something like 13 years.

Anyway, he is very positive about his experience, and he has stayed involved, helping others get sober. It sounds like a very good organization that can really help people get on the right path.

Just a thought regarding your pastor-- that’s what he’s there for, you shouldn’t be ashamed to seek his help. That’s the kind of thing that could turn out to be a gift… if he helps you, you will very likely end up much closer to him, which will only help strengthen your relationship with God.

Pete


#5

[quote=Jerusha]It is not Christian-founded. It is not affiliated with any particular religion. It only teaches that seeking God will help. You may do best to find a group that meets in a church (they rent space).

Do not be ashamed to talk to your parish priest about it. They don’t bite, especially since being honest about the problem is the first step towards solving it. They deal with those issues all the time, particularly in the confessional, and some in their own lives. They also know about other community resources.
[/quote]

Wrong. AA was founded by 2 men who were professed Christians and understood the role of Divine intervention in their success in establishing and maintaining their sobriety through the support of like minded individuals seeking sobriety. They made reference to “God” and “Power” purposely universal/generic to provide assistance to those who do not necesarily subscribe to a Chrisitian God or worldview, but would benefit from the 12-step principles for recovery from the disease of alcoholism.


#6

A few years ago I took a college credit class called Drugs and Alcohol Use and Abuse. I was required to attend one AA meeting and report my findings. What really bothered me was that my instructor advised the students to pretend we were alcoholics and simply sit and listen. At the meeting I attended (quite large 40 or more people in a Catholic church hall) I was so touched by everyone’s sincerity and openess that I did not pretend anything either. I told them who I was right from the start and asked their permission to stay for the meeting. In all I was completely impressed by the love, support and prayers they offered each other. It was a humbling experience for me and I have great sympathy and love for all those with addictions. I believe AA really and truly helps people with addictions. D.O.M. I hope and pray you go to an AA meeting and give the people there a try. Try a few different AA groups.


#7

Hi my name is Mary and I’m an alcoholic…
boy that really brings it back for me. I never saw anything in AA that conflicted with my Catholic beliefs. I prefer to talk to my pastor but AA folks “been there done that” if I have a problem that needs someone with experience


#8

[quote=D.O.M.]I don’t want him to think badly about me or my family. Any advice?
[/quote]

It is very honorable to ask for help. Go to the AA meeting. Rejoice in you new found freedome. Even if you don’t think you have a problem, you will gain a wealth of information.


#9

Because alcoholism is a disease that alienates one from God, to pressure a salvation experience and immediate transformation on a person is usually counter-productive. Bill and Bob were pretty far from God when they first founded AA, although they did have support from the Oxford Groups and others, who were professed Christians.

They made reference to “God” and “Power” purposely universal/generic to provide assistance to those who do not necesarily subscribe to a Christian God or worldview

That is necessary, because Bible-thumping generally alienates people who are struggling with the problem, because more guilt just makes it worse.

So, at the time they founded AA, they were, if Christians, very minimally so. Their relationship with God grew as they did. Such an experience is typical, and the reason it is not affiliated with any particular creed.

I never saw anything in AA that conflicted with my Catholic beliefs.


#10

EXACTLY Jerusha!!! I got into an argument with my pastor about the whole higher power thing once and I explained to him that many alcoholics have issues with God at the beginning then “come to believe” as they grow in sobriety…I won the arguement by the way…


#11

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