A Convert needs to have a Rant

#21

According to this article, Eastern rite Catholics in North America have been able to ordain married men as priests since late 2014:

ncregister.com/daily-news/eastern-catholic-married-priesthood-authorized-in-north-america

or this one: lastampa.it/2014/11/15/vaticaninsider/eng/the-vatican/vatican-introduces-new-norms-for-eastern-rite-married-priests-LOgLRXduvb2qri0pXF0X3O/pagina.html

Apparently it was originally forbidden in 1890 because the Church thought the average Catholic wouldn’t be able to understand why some priests were married and some weren’t able to marry. Now it looks like that rule was repealed in 2014. The bishops of W. Canada recently visited the Pope, including a Ukrainian rite bishop, and they discussed married priests. It didn’t seem to be a problem. So why are the bishops of the Byzantine rite not going along? Are the Eastern rites so different that you couldn’t simply go to one of the other rites who are willing to ordain married men and get ordained there?

I was researching a totally different topic and came across this article: tabletmag.com/jewish-life-and-religion/94336/prelude-and-fugue

It concerns a woman living in Israel who was going to get married to a Jewish man who was very secular. All of a sudden he became very religious, and she didn’t fit into the picture and he broke up with her. This is her view of the situation. She is now the music critic for the NY Times, by the way. In reading some other articles about Eastern rite priests, it was very clear that the wife must also feel a vocation and be in complete agreement with her husband’s desire to become a priest. I personally feel your primary responsibility is to your wife and her happiness. Good luck.

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#22

Yeah…Papa Francis officially killed Cum Data Fuerit, but some bishops are still trying to warm to ordaining married men as priests. Anyway, if you are going for the priesthood as a married man in the Ruthenian church (which the eparchy of Passaic is a part of), you will need to be in a stable marriage (with perhaps a few years being married?) first. Please also note that you will have to have the full consent of your wife. If she says no, the bishop will not ordain you. By the way, your eparchy is not the only one right now having trouble trying to staff parishes with priests. The eparchy I am in, the Archeparchy of Pittsburgh, also currently has this trouble. The only Ruthenian eparchy I know of that is stable is the Eparchy of Phoenix (which has a priest for each parish in the eparchy; I know this from my priest friend who is on loan to the Archeparchy of Pittsburgh from the Eparchy of Phoenix), although the Eparchy of Parma might be stable as well (but not totally sure).

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#23

RCTech these are good points and my wife does approve of my desire to be a priest, but since she’s coming from a Latin rite she is unknown of what a Priests wife does and how one lives that life. Coming from a Protestant Church, my grandfather was a Pastor and my grandmother was the Church Mother, so I have grown up with this type arrangement. I have started to make friends with the Ruthenian Orthodox Priest who is down the road who is about our age so maybe this will help. Maybe while we grow these relationships, the path will become clearer, but my wife supports me 110% in going to the Priesthood should the Bishop ever allow it.

Thanks all for the information and time that you have used in helping me with this. I realize I just need to ask for patience from the Holy Spirit.

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#24

I see where your frustration comes from, but celibacy is a very important part of the priestly tradition (just search it on YouTube. I’m sure there’s someone out there that can explain it better than me). I would recommend maybe looking into becoming a deacon. That might bring some peace to your heart.

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closed #25
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