A difference between Christ and the Body of Christ?!

Today at the Mass our priest (a Dominican friar, from Caribbean) has claimed that we do not serve Christ when do something good for the Church community (namely, singing, doing readings, priest serving Mass, etc.) We truly serve Christ himself, and not the community, in his words, in our ordinary lives, doing God’s will in everyday routine.

In response to someone’s objection (made by someone before the Mass) that the Church is the Body of Christ, he replied: “Yes, we are the body of Christ, but we are not Christ! There is a difference!”

Is this statement correct?! :confused: I’m confused… Well, obviously, the Church is not only “us” (living people) - it is Jesus as the invisible head and all the angels and saints in the Heaven. But can we actually say that the Church is not exactly Christ?! :shrug:

Jesus is the Bridegroom and the Church is the Bride. Remember when Adam says Eve was “flesh of my flesh” and “blood of my blood”? It is echoed again in the Eucharist when Jesus gives his flesh and blood to us, the Church and the Bride. So while the Bridegroom and Bride are one, they are not the same.

JurisPrudens #1
Is this statement correct?! I’m confused… Well, obviously, the Church is not only “us” (living people) - it is Jesus as the invisible head and all the angels and saints in the Heaven. But can we actually say that the Church is not exactly Christ?!

This puts the essentials in the right perspective, by the revered Fr John A Hardon, S.J.

CHURCH. The faithful of the whole world. This broad definition can be understood in various senses all derived from the Scriptures, notably as **the community of believers, the kingdom of God, and the Mystical Body of Christ.
**
As the community of believers, the Church is the assembly (ekklesia) of all who believe in Jesus Christ; or the fellowship (koinonia) of all who are bound together by their common love for the Savior. As the kingdom (basileia), it is the fulfillment of the ancient prophecies about the reign of the Messiah. And as the Mystical Body it is the communion of all those made holy by the grace of Christ. He is their invisible head and they are his visible members. These include the faithful on earth, those in purgatory who are not yet fully purified, and the saints in heaven.

Since the Council of Trent, the Catholic Church has been defined as a union of human beings who are united by the profession of the same Christian faith, and by participation of and in the same sacraments under the direction of their lawful pastors, especially of the one representative of Christ on earth, the Bishop of Rome. Each element in this definition is meant to exclude all others from actual and vital membership in the Catholic Church, namely apostates and heretics who do not profess the same Christian faith, non-Christians who do not receive the same sacraments, and schismatics who are not submissive to the Church’s lawful pastors under the Bishop of Rome.

At the Second Vatican Council this concept of the Church was recognized as the objective reality that identifies the fullness of the Roman Catholic Church. But it was qualified subjectively so as to somehow include all who are baptized and profess their faith in Jesus Christ. They are the People of God, whom he has chosen to be his own and on whom he bestows the special graces of his providence. (Etym. Greek kyriakon, church; from kyriakos, belonging to the Lord.)
therealpresence.org/cgi-bin/getdefinition.pl
*Modern Catholic Dictionary *by Fr. John A. Hardon, S.J.

“Christ says to Saul: Why persecutest thou Me? Precisely, the Church is Christ and Christ is the Church – such is the Divine equation" Fulton J. Sheen

So, who is right: my priest or Abp. Sheen?! :confused:

Not knowing either one, I can’t tell, but it seems that in human life, you serve someone when you tend to his body!

ICXC NIKA

And is St. Joan of Arc right?

At her trial, St. Joan of Arc replied, “About Jesus Christ and the Church, I simply know they are just one thing and we shouldn’t complicate the matter.”

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