A housewife's career


#1

Inspired by another thread on careers. I worked full time following leaving university and then went part time and the latter was far superior in my opinion. Full time work drove me bananas. There are a number of advantages in spending more time at home.

  1. more time to shop. You’ve got more time to browse in the sales and bargain hunt.
  2. have your friends round in the day. I had mini-parties in my house during the day but hubby wasn’t invited.
  3. more time to visit relatives. My gran was ill so spent a few days visiting her.
  4. time to do housework in the day which means more leisure time in the evening and at weekends. More time to spend with hubby.
  5. learned to cook and bake. Although the latter is a housewife cliche and makes you fat I went through a stage of baking on Friday and my husband looked forward for his cake all day.
  6. more time to do DIY/decorating or gardening. Save some money on paid labour but depends on your interest. Do a DIY course.
  7. somebody to look after workmen. You don’t need to take annual leave in order to look after workmen in your house.
  8. A couple of days trips as a treat.

I never turned the tv on during the day and is a sign of a bad housewife. I don’t know how to cope with kids yet.


#2

Yes, it’s great if your husband can support you both.

At the moment in the U.S., we’re in the midst of a recession that is worse than anything I have seen (I’m 52.) There was a recession in the 1980s that resulted in 25% unemployment in industrial cities (like mine), but this current recession seems to be more far-reaching. Not just factory workers are losing their jobs, but people in many business-related professions. At the moment, my city has about 15% unemployment, and it’s getting worse every month.

Because of the turbulent economic times in the U.S. I would say that anyone who has a job should strive to keep it, and anyone who can get a job should take it in case their spouse loses theirs. And the money from the “extra” job should be saved for hard times. This doesn’t seem to be a good time to enjoy life and relax. We should look at the ants–they work hard storing up food. So should we.

I’ll admit that I and my husband need a serious attitude re-adjustment when it comes to our spending. We joke that we’re “helping to stimulate the economy” by spending our money, but frankly, I think we’re being foolish. We have never used the money from my income to pay for necessities; instead, we used it to pay for private school, figure skating expenses, going out to eat, etc. But as long as I have a job, it would sure be sensible to save more of it in case the worse happens and my husband loses his job, as has happened to people all over the U.S.


#3

I too hated working full time and when I had kids, I started working part time…which is great b/c I can spend lots of time with them…If you do have kids, most of your day will be taken up with them…but I still have mini “parties” at my house during day but they are mother-kid parties but it’s nice to see and talk to other mothers…:slight_smile:


#4

I’m not married anymore and don’t have young kids but I’m caring for a (cranky & demanding) elderly person and running his household so it’s pretty similar. For awhile I worked only part-time and retained my sanity, enjoyed some free time and saw my friends a lot more. But at 57, and in the current economy, I knew if I didn’t get back into the regular workforce post haste, I’d be in deep trouble later. So now I work full-time and take care of him nights and weekends. It’s exhausting. I’m too old for this! But I don’t see any way around it right now. I totally agree with Cat. Whoever’s not working right now should probably try to work (unless childcare costs would eat up the money) - and put the money in savings in case things get worse.

Cat, like you, I feel a personal responsibility for keeping the economy afloat with my spending. But last night I took a look at the way I fritter money away and was horrified, especially when there are so many people who desperately need help right now. I need to ‘straighten up and fly right’, as my mother used to say.


#5

You are going to run yourself ragged…if you could cut back here and there, you should go part time…Taking care of an elderly person is physically and mentally demanding…


#6

I would love to go back to being a housewife as my primarily career. Currently I work 40 hours weekly for the state. My children are grown with children of their own. I am a hands on Nana. My toddler grandsons and 8 year old grand daughter spend time with Papa and me regularly. I do my housework after work and on weekends. My DH does help more now that he is convalescing at home for heart surgery. The dishes are put away, his laundry stays done, the dog gets his walks etc.
But I miss being home.
Here’s a lovely web site I found I just want to share with other wives who are interested in a housewifery career.

bloomingathome.wordpress.com/


#7

:smiley:

That’s easy! Your list looks like this (assuming you only have one car, and the husband takes it to work):

-]1) more time to shop. You’ve got more time to browse in the sales and bargain hunt./-]
-]2) have your friends round in the day. I had mini-parties in my house during the day but hubby wasn’t invited./-]
-]3) more time to visit relatives. My gran was ill so spent a few days visiting her./-]
4) time to do housework in the day which means more leisure time in the evening and at weekends. More time to spend with hubby.
5) learned to cook and bake. Although the latter is a housewife cliche and makes you fat I went through a stage of baking on Friday and my husband looked forward for his cake all day.
-]6) more time to do DIY/decorating or gardening. Save some money on paid labour but depends on your interest. Do a DIY course./-]
7) somebody to look after workmen. You don’t need to take annual leave in order to look after workmen in your house.
-]8) A couple of days trips as a treat./-]

I just love crossing things off lists… Makes me feel like I’ve accomplished something! :wink:


#8

dashso40,
Thanks for your suggestion; wish I could go back to part-time but as I said in my post, if I don’t stay in the regular work force now (at 57), it will be that much harder to find a job when I’m 58 or 60. Especially under the present administration that seems to have so little respect for older people. I’m going to hang in there and hope to adjust or run screaming into the wilderness and become a hermit. (Sounds better by the minute!)


#9

My husband’s job seems secure right now although we’re currently in recession in Britain. One of my friend’s jobs was in peril but they’ve found him another. We’ve got house insurance in case anything happens but he’s been in the job quite a while.

Good luck for your retirements.


#10

My husband actually has the TV on most of the time (news, political talk shows, History, Discovery - nothing I feel is bad for the kid to hear.

And he still copes with DD much better than I do.

My only point: I respect the man I married more every day and I’m thankful for threads like these for helping me realize that. :slight_smile:


#11

:yup:

:smiley:


#12

Ditto what Truly Beloved posted, and I have a fews things to add that come into play when your children are little:

1- Wipe runny noses, change dirty diapers, and receive slobbery kisses on a daily basis.
2- Less time for housework due to stories having to be read, block towers having to be build, fights to be interceded, spills to be cleaned up, and a myriad questions to be answered all day every day, like “mommy, why is water wet?” and the like.
3- Less quality time to be spend with hubby at night due to being completely exhausted by 8 pm.

I am a homemaker, a stay-at-home mom to a 3 year old and a 1 year old. I firmly believe that my job is as important as any other, after all I am helping to raise the next generation and that is an extremely serious responsibility. But it is by no means a relaxed, eat-bonbons-all-day-while-watching-soaps type existence. The hours are ridiculous, the pay is lousy, and I can’t remember the last time I could take a vacation day. :wink: The fringe benefits are wonderful though. Kisses, hugs, and “I love you, mommy!” more than make up for the negatives.


#13

Aw, that’s a sweet post. :o I agree…when I was a SAHM when my kiddos were little, it was awesome…but, I have to say, I think it’s harder than what I do now for work. :smiley: I was never a domestic diva type, so I found housework and such more challenging than going to the office, now. I however LOVED being home with my kids, and if one of the parents CAN FEASIBLY do that financially, that’s a great things, that you will never regret. I don’t believe it HAS to be the mom…if the woman in the marriage makes more than her husband, and has health benefits, it might be wiser in that case to have the husband as the stay at home parent for the child(ren). But, whatever works for a family.


#14

Last fall, I went back to teaching full time after being home (and homeschooling) for many years.

I love teaching, but I also love being at home. At home, I have time for everyday things (Dr. appts, vet appts, furnace inspector, grocery shopping, house cleaning) that I now have to cram into weekends during the school year.

I am grateful to have a job in this economy, but honestly, I’d rather be working part time. However, to retire and be somewhat comfortable, I’ll need all the SS I can get when the time comes (if there’s any left).


#15

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