A Lost Art? Hospitality


#1

A LOST ART?
Hospitality
New Oxford Review
February 2001By Mitchell Kalpakgian

Throughout the Odyssey, Homer’s epic that distinguishes between the civilized and the barbarians – between those who know the art of “living well” (Aristotle’s phrase) like the Phaeacians and those who only live in the sense of mere survival like the Cyclops – the rituals of hospitality always feature banquets to honor the visitor:

A maid came with water in a beautiful golden ewer and poured it out over a silver basin so that he could wash his hands. Then she drew a wooden table to his side, and the staid housekeeper brought some bread and put it by him with a choice of dainties, helping him liberally to all she could offer. Read more of [/font]the article here….

After reading this article I thought about the little ways of hospitality I give to my immediate family everyday. When my DH and family come home from work and school they are received with a smile and warm, bright, clean and quiet home. The table is clean and attractively set and a fresh meal is there for all to enjoy.

I was wondering what little ways you share the loving embrace of your heart with family and friends when they enter your home.

And in what way do you like being ‘cared for and welcomed’ in your home or a friend’s home?

What are the little hospitable ways that really matter to you?


#2

[quote=contemplative]A LOST ART?
Hospitality
New Oxford Review
February 2001By Mitchell Kalpakgian

Throughout the Odyssey, Homer’s epic that distinguishes between the civilized and the barbarians – between those who know the art of “living well” (Aristotle’s phrase) like the Phaeacians and those who only live in the sense of mere survival like the Cyclops – the rituals of hospitality always feature banquets to honor the visitor:

A maid came with water in a beautiful golden ewer and poured it out over a silver basin so that he could wash his hands. Then she drew a wooden table to his side, and the staid housekeeper brought some bread and put it by him with a choice of dainties, helping him liberally to all she could offer. Read more of the article here….

After reading this article I thought about the little ways of hospitality I give to my immediate family everyday. When my DH and family come home from work and school they are received with a smile and warm, bright, clean and quiet home. The table is clean and attractively set and a fresh meal is there for all to enjoy.

I was wondering what little ways you share the loving embrace of your heart with family and friends when they enter your home.

And in what way do you like being ‘cared for and welcomed’ in your home or a friend’s home?

What are the little hospitable ways that really matter to you?
[/quote]

I love the New Oxford Review!

As far as hospitality, I am a big fan of it. I try to have cookies and other goodies baked for company, but I have fallen out of the habit of keeping bread baked. I also like to offer tea or something else to drink to houseguests and students who come, as well as to keep some good books and magazines handy to comfy chairs and cozy blankets for a nice stay.

I love to have dinner ready for my husband when he comes home from work, and to keep his favorite magazines and books close to his chair. I like to ‘spoil’ him when he is home by bringing him whatever he needs.

I remember talking to an elderly friend of my mom’s a few years ago. She had raved about the Benedictine Oblates who take a vow of hospitality!


#3

[quote=captaincatholic]I love the New Oxford Review!

As far as hospitality, I am a big fan of it. I try to have cookies and other goodies baked for company, but I have fallen out of the habit of keeping bread baked. I also like to offer tea
[/quote]

I am a softee for homebaked sweets and breads…they don’t last long around here…I baked a concord grape pie last evening…it is 1/2 eaten already…must have been consumed as a late night snack or breakfast!!

With the large assortment of teas available at food markets today it is easy to keep a nice selection at home for family and guests. I just added ‘sleepytime’ by Celestial.


#4

[quote=contemplative]I am a softee for homebaked sweets and breads…they don’t last long around here…I baked a concord grape pie last evening…it is 1/2 eaten already…must have been consumed as a late night snack or breakfast!!
.
[/quote]

Not to get your thread off track, but PLEASE - give me your recipe???

On topic -

My mom raised me to FEED people, when they come to my house, it is EAT EAT. Someone can show up, and I’m digging cheese and crackers out within 10 minutes :slight_smile:

I also love to have candles and soft light for guests, a big warm fire in the fireplace when it is cold outside just feels cozy :slight_smile:


#5

For kids the ultimate hospitality is a full cookie jar. :dancing:

For moms it always seemed to be a cup of coffee. :rolleyes:

For men the best thing is good cooking…and lots of it. :smiley:


#6

[quote=kage_ar]Not to get your thread off track, but PLEASE - give me your recipe???

[/quote]

9" Grape Pie
Squeeze the pulp out of 7 cups of concord grapes.
Save the skin in a bowl.
Boil the pulp for 5 minutes.
Sieve the pulp and throw away the seeds.
Combine in a bowl – 3 tablespoons of cornstarch, 1 cup of sugar, ½ teaspoon of salt and a little orange peel (fresh or dried)
Add to pulp in a kettle and cook until thick – stir constantly
Remove from heat and stir in the grape skins.
Let cool and then bake in a crust with crust top.
10 minutes at 425 degrees
30 minutes at 325 degrees or until crust is golden.
Serve cooled to room temperature with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream on the side. Slices should be small because the flavor is really, really big.

Explore Virginia Stefano

#7

My grandma was the best. The first words out of her mouth when company was coming up the sidewalk were, “Put the kettle on!” She also loved cooking and feeding people. If people ate prior to visiting she was genuinely hurt.

My company nowadays is mostly my son and his family. Once a month we try to give them a vacation from their hectic lives by having them over to dinner. They love that someone else made healthy food. My DIL loves being waited on hand and foot because she never gets this at home, my son loves falling asleep in the recliner because he can’t at home, and the grandkids love having our undivided attention.

They leave smiling, we are left smiling, and life is good.


#8

Oh, Contemplative, I’m almost hyperventilating, that pie looks SOOOO delicious!!! What an evil tease for those of us due to go out for some exercise…:wink:


#9

Hospitality is something instilled in southern girls like me. Always having a fresh pitcher of sweet tea and lemons ready for anyone who comes by. Also during the summer, the frig in the garage FULL of drinks of all kinds.

Also, being able to grill something at the drop of a hat!

Fall time of year…always be ready to fix a huge pot of chili or beef stew! And of course…coffee time about 2pm.

Then we have some real good friends who every Saturday, they have their pool open, grill ready and we just drop by anytime…that’s really fun.

Hospitality is an art…I hope it’s never lost.


#10

[quote=DJgang] Also during the summer, the frig in the garage FULL of drinks of all kinds.

[/quote]

On hot summer days, we keep a cooler of cold drinks on the carport, and neighborhood kids will help themselves :slight_smile:


#11

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.