A prolife question from a coworker


#1

Around Terry Chiovo’s death, I over heard a coworker say “she did not understand why the Catholic church was working so hard to keep her alive”.

How would you answer? I gave my pat answer but I would really like to find something I could print off and give to her explaining our position. She is the kind of person that will not get upset if I give her something like this.

Thanks
Eric


#2

Wow…this is a case that has many layers of issues.

I would refer her to these sites…

bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/brunel/U835305?s_fromedit=1
terrisfight.org

I probably would have said…

“Terri was not dying - she was not terminal. The Church teaches it is wrong to actively bring about the death for such a person by starving and dehydrating them…”


#3

Here you goforums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=49136
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=48119
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=47998
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=46010
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=46292
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=46537
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=46513
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=45724
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=44904
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=45644
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=45589
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=44894
If you need more just let me know.


#4

I know you want something printable, BUT, as the others here have said, Terri was not dying. I have a VERY liberal (pro-gay, pro-abort, anti-Bush) friend who volunteers for Hospice. She didn’t understand why Terri was ever AT an Hospice in the first place. Hospice is where one goes when one is terminally ill. My grandma was in Hospice’s care (at her own home) when she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. We were told that Hospice is for those 6 months and under to live. Hospice is all about dying in comfort. This Lib Friend told me that she saw one of her own grandma’s starve/dehydrate to death because her body couldn’t process food and such, and they had to keep tweezers nearby to pick off the dead skin from off her lips (as they were flaking off) so she didn’t choke on it. Also, her body skin was in bad condition. She believes in choice for moms, BUT, neither she, nor many other liberals with whom I communicate understood this. (If for nothing else, why didn’t the husband just hand her over to the parents?, but, that’s a different topic.) Basically, this one friend knew that what was happening wasn’t pretty. The Church and others with common sense knew that this would be the beginning of a slippery slope that may give way to getting rid of others who are an inconvienience. All life is valuable and we wanted to preserve hers.


#5

[quote=EricCKS]Around Terry Chiovo’s death, I over heard a coworker say “she did not understand why the Catholic church was working so hard to keep her alive”.

How would you answer? I gave my pat answer but I would really like to find something I could print off and give to her explaining our position. She is the kind of person that will not get upset if I give her something like this.

Thanks
Eric
[/quote]

Human life deserves, without qualification, dignity and respect. We may never do harm to innocent life. A person who is disabled should be given food, water, shelter, and hygenic care (clean bedding, bathing, etc). This is all normal care due to us as human beings. While discontinuing a treatment that is merely prolonging life of a failing body is allowed (like ventillators) giving the basic and ordinary care due to all people is not.

Why is food or water ordinary and not extraordinary? Because NO ONE can live without food or water. Babies, people who bedridden (conscious or not), and people with limited mental capacity cannot procure these basic needs for themselves. It is our duty to provide them, by whatever means is available.

What did Terri die of? Starvation and dehydration. Starving someone to death is direct murder, euthanasia. It is NOT allowing an already dying person to die.

If you left a baby or a mentally retarded person in a room for 14 days they would die too. You would then be facing capital murder.

Whether she was conscious or not is irrelevant. No one has the ability to decide whether a human life is “worth” living. The moment you do, you are in the world of moral relativism. That means someone-- the government maybe-- has the right to say who lives and who dies… and that is contrary to the dignity and absolute right of the human person. Nazi Germany had laws requiring the euthanizing of those whose lives were considered “not worth living” and I think that the people who were gassed would disagree with Hitler’s assessment of their lives. NO ONE can be judge of another’s life-- YOU could be next. Hitler didn’t just exterminate jews-- but anyone with physical deformities, mentally challenged, Gypsies, Catholics, and political dissenters. No one can have that power over life.


#6

[quote=EricCKS]Around Terry Chiovo’s death, I over heard a coworker say “she did not understand why the Catholic church was working so hard to keep her alive”.

How would you answer? I gave my pat answer but I would really like to find something I could print off and give to her explaining our position. She is the kind of person that will not get upset if I give her something like this.

Thanks
Eric
[/quote]

The Church was not “working to keep her alive”. It was working to keep her from being murdered.


#7

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