A Question About Lent

Is it okay to eat chicken and other poultry on Fridays during lent? For a long time I thought the only things we could eat was fish or seafood. Now everyone is telling me that poultry is alright, just not mammals.

Poultry (turkey, chicken, duck, and other “birds”) are still considered meat.

No. Poultry, although not mammals, are still considered meat. We can only eat seafood on Fridays ( as an added discipline, we should also abstain and fast on Wednesdays also, even though it is not required. ).

PAX DOMINI :signofcross:

Shalom Aleichem

noting the forum, I don’t know the discipline in the Eastern churches, but since it is generally stricter than the Latin, would assume since we cannot eat the flesh of warm blooded animals, including fowl, then the fast in the Eastern rites would be even stricter. NO the law in the west is not “we must eat fish on Friday.” the law is that fish and other cold-blooded animals MAY be eaten, so may all foods of vegetable origin, and in the West, dairy and eggs. There also I believe the Eastern rule is stricter.

Why?

It’s not required to fast Fridays (aside from Good Friday), just abstain, so I’m curious.

the OP question is about abstinence from meat, not about fasting, but the regulations in the Eastern Churches usually are given under a blanket for their various fasting seasons, so that is why it is discussed in that context. hope one knowledgeable in those traditions responds pretty soon, as their rules are much stricter and cover more days

there is a sticky on AAA with articles on Lent and Easter in general which you can reference for these general questions

here are the results of a search on “fast” on the Eastern Catholicism forum
forums.catholic.com/search.php?searchid=6147630
you could also use Lent or abstinence as key word

The Eparchy of the Protection of Mary of Phoenix for the Ruthenians issued guidelines for the fast…

the minimum: no meat on Wednesdays or Fridays of the great fast, and No meat, milk, eggs nor oil on the first Monday of the fast nor on good Friday.

More severe abstinence, and mild fasting as well, were recommended but not required. Sundays are exempt from all fasting & abstinence, except the eucharistic fast.

All who commune are required to observe the minimum unless dispensed by their pastor.

Oh. I’m just a plain ol’ RC.

From your question it doesn’t sound like you’re asking about abstaining for Eastern Catholics even though you’ve posted in the Eastern Catholicism section. We don’t eat meat, which includes chicken, nor fish any Friday or Wednesday, year round. They are strict Fast days all year, excepting when a Feast falls on that day.

Russian Catholic: No meat since Meatfare Sunday and basically vegan and no wine from Cheesefare Sunday until Pascha, wine and oil allowed on weekends. Fish. oil and wine allowed for Annunciation of the Theotokas, and Palm Sunday, and Cavier allowed Lazarus Saturday. :slight_smile:

Parish and Eparchy calendars typically have annotations for what the fasting expectations are for that day. Also, “readings for the day” sites usually have the guidelines at the bottom of the daily readings.

Canon Law for the Latin Church covers fasting, abstinence and penance for Latin Church Catholics in canons 1250-1253
It’s a novel idea that chicken isn’t meat. Tell that to a vegetarian. :slight_smile:

The Latin abstinence for meat on Fridays is year round

Can. 1251 Abstinence from meat, or from some other food as determined by the Episcopal Conference, is to be observed on all Fridays, unless a solemnity should fall on a Friday. Abstinence and fasting are to be observed on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday.

it’s just that people go with the “other” option in Can. 1253

Can. 1253 The conference of bishops can determine more precisely the observance of fast and abstinence as well as substitute other forms of penance, especially works of charity and exercises of piety, in whole or in part, for abstinence and fast.

or, most often, ignore the canon altogether and neither abstain nor substitute works of charity. From talking with Latin Catholics most mistakenly think that the Second Vatican Council simply did away with the discipline of abstaining from meat on Fridays.

There has been a lot of mis-understanding of the directives of Vatican II. Either the local bishops or the Vatican itself should correct these and then enforce them.

It should also be noted that in the Latin Church those of age 65 and older ( and of certain medical conditions ) are excused from the fasting and abstinence requirements, except for Holy Week.

PAX DOMINI :signofcross:

Shalom Aleichem

This information is incorrect.
From the US Bishops web site

Ash Wednesday and Good Friday are obligatory days of universal fast and abstinence. Fasting is obligatory for all who have completed their 18th year and have not yet reached their 60th year. Fasting allows a person to eat one full meal. Two smaller meals may be taken, not to equal one full meal. Abstinence (from meat) is obligatory for all who have reached their 14th year.

If possible, the fast on Good Friday is continued until the Easter Vigil (on Holy Saturday night) as the “paschal fast” to honor the suffering and death of the Lord Jesus, and to prepare ourselves to share more fully and to celebrate more readily his Resurrection.

Fridays in Lent are obligatory days of complete abstinence (from meat) for all who have completed their 14th year.

We encourage you to make use of the site. Through our works of prayer, fasting, and abstinence, let us heed the prophet Joel’s exhortation to return to God with our whole heart (2:12).

Note that even though there is an age limit for fasting none exist for abstinence.

Quoted by adrift;

This information is incorrect.
From the US Bishops web site:

[quote]Quote:
Ash Wednesday and Good Friday are obligatory days of universal fast and abstinence. Fasting is obligatory for all who have completed their 18th year and have not yet reached their 60th year. Fasting allows a person to eat one full meal. Two smaller meals may be taken, not to equal one full meal. Abstinence (from meat) is obligatory for all who have reached their 14th year.

If possible, the fast on Good Friday is continued until the Easter Vigil (on Holy Saturday night) as the “paschal fast” to honor the suffering and death of the Lord Jesus, and to prepare ourselves to share more fully and to celebrate more readily his Resurrection.

Fridays in Lent are obligatory days of complete abstinence (from meat) for all who have completed their 14th year.

We encourage you to make use of the site. Through our works of prayer, fasting, and abstinence, let us heed the prophet Joel’s exhortation to return to God with our whole heart (2:12).

Note that even though there is an age limit for fasting none exist for abstinence.
[/quote]

Thank you. It seems that I have been given the wrong information.

PAX DOMINI :signofcross:

Shalom Aleichem

The Eastern Catholic fasting is way more disciplined and widely followed today than the Latin Catholics. I’m pretty sure all Latin Catholics have to do these days is not eat meat (except fish) on Fridays. However, I prefer to follow the traditional Latin Church fasting regulations to make my Lent more “Lenty.” This includes fasting and abstaining on Fridays and Saturdays, as well as fasting during the rest of the week ('cept Sunday!).

fisheaters.com/fasting.html

Your welcome. I think what you believed is a common misconception.

March 25 is also exempt from fasting unless it falls on Great Friday,which happen very rarely…

One is always encouraged to do more than the minimum :slight_smile:

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