About Saints


#1

The subject of saints came up at work with St. Patrick’s day coming up and my (protestant) co-workers do not believe in saints. They said that there were many bible verses which refer to saints, but that they are talking about christians when they say saints in the bible. Can someone help me out here? I thought people didn’t become saints until they died, but one friend says that the bible specifically is talking about living people. thank you


#2

You should go to the library and get a book with nice pictures of some saints. You can assure your Prot friend that there is recorded info on what ordinary people did and did them before, during and after the reformation (or as CM would say the deformation).

He doesnt believe in saints because he has no history. He is a protestant so he has no concept of totally giving up your life in service to God which the saints prove to us is possible to do. In other words works and faith make the Christian, not just faith. The saints are what makes the CC stand out, the prots have nothing to look to as a role model.

There were references to saints in the Bible, and they did refer to stand out Christians who were living. Now days it refers to someone who has died that was a stand out Christian.

Ask him what makes a saint. Im interested in what he has to say about that. There is one subtle thing that I have noticed is that prots love to trash the saints, but they do it softly so they arent detected. Any one else notice this?


#3

You may be interested to know that the CCC specifically says that you and I, as believers, are saints. In the Catholic Church, we started to call people Saint if they had certain verifiable information. So much so that today, most Catholics would say “I am no Saint”. The fact remains though, that the teaching of the Catholic Church says we are saints and has never taught otherwise. It is simply in the common usage of the word, Catholics apply it to verifible saints.

The question for your friends would be what happens to saints who die? Do they cease to be saints?

God Bless,
Maria

P.S. This was one of the things that my fundamental friends said, “You know, Catholic Church teaches that you and I aren’t saints, but the Bible says otherwise.” Guess what! The Catholic Church doesn’t teach that you and I are not saints!

1475 In the communion of saints, "a perennial link of charity exists between the faithful who have already reached their heavenly home, those who are expiating their sins in purgatory and those who are still pilgrims on earth. between them there is, too, an abundant exchange of all good things."87 In this wonderful exchange, the holiness of one profits others, well beyond the harm that the sin of one could cause others. Thus recourse to the communion of saints lets the contrite sinner be more promptly and efficaciously purified of the punishments for sin.

saint in heaven, saints in purgatory and saints on earth. All Saints!


#4

Let ‘em stay home then and we’ll do all the drinkin’ for 'em…
http://pages.prodigy.net/bestsmileys1/emoticons3/freebie-irish-derby.gif

The term “saint” is applied to both. As Catholics we add a special aspect to it in that the Church formally recognizes those persons who led especially holy lives…it’s ( of course) called Canonization.
If those “eejits” had the slightest knowlege of history, they’d recognize that it was St. Patrick’s Irish monks who brought light and science, and Christianity back to Europe after the dark ages when the barbarians destroyed all the forces of civilization. But then what can ya say of a lot that has no history themselves beyond 1517…
Pax vobiscum,


#5

[quote=Church Militant]Let ‘em stay home then and we’ll do all the drinkin’ for 'em…
http://pages.prodigy.net/bestsmileys1/emoticons3/freebie-irish-derby.gif

The term “saint” is applied to both. As Catholics we add a special aspect to it in that the Church formally recognizes those persons who led especially holy lives…it’s ( of course) called Canonization.
If those “eejits” had the slightest knowlege of history, they’d recognize that it was St. Patrick’s Irish monks who brought light and science, and Christianity back to Europe after the dark ages when the barbarians destroyed all the forces of civilization. But then what can ya say of a lot that has no history themselves beyond 1517…
Pax vobiscum,
[/quote]

Hi C.M. I thought those monks brought the corned beef and cabbage? :smiley: God Bless


#6

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