About the Glory Be


#1

What, if anything governs the form of the Glory Be prayer?

Glory be to the Father,
And to the Son,
And to the Holy Spirit.

As it was in the beginning
Is now
And will be forever

World without end

Amen

When does one use the first part, plus with the second part, and then with the third part?

Inquiring minds want to know!


#2

The Gloria Patri is a doxology which has been handed down through hundreds if not a thousand plus years through the liturgy so I suppose it’s the liturgy that “governs” it.

The Gloria Patri is heard in the Vidi Aquam and Asperges Me (sprinkling rites) sung before Sunday High Masses in the Extraordinary Form, where it’s heard at the end of the Psalm verses before the verses from the beginning are again repeated up to the Psalm. It can also be heard toward the end of the Introit proper, though not in the Ordinary Form of the Mass.

The only times I can think of where seemingly the final part the prayer is used alone is also throughout the EF Mass where Per omnia saecula saeculorum is said by the priest several times, to which the reply is Amen. In the Gloria Patri though it is phrased as et in saecula saeculorum. The words saecula saeculorum are found throughout the Vulgate Bible.

I also know if a choir was to sing a hymn with 7 verses, even if only there is enough time to sing 4 verses the final verse must be sung if it is the Gloria Patri

Sadly little or none of this has yet to be extended to the OF Mass as far as I know.


#3

The Gloria Patri is a doxology which has been handed down through hundreds if not a thousand plus years through the liturgy so I suppose it’s the liturgy that “governs” it.

The Gloria Patri is heard in the Vidi Aquam and Asperges Me (sprinkling rites) sung before Sunday High Masses in the Extraordinary Form, where it’s sang at the end of the Psalm verses before the verses from the beginning are again repeated up to the Psalm. It can also be heard toward the end of the Introit proper, though not in the Ordinary Form of the Mass.

The only times I can think of where seemingly the final part the prayer is used alone is also throughout the EF Mass where Per omnia saecula saeculorum is said by the priest several times, to which the reply is Amen. In the Gloria Patri though it is phrased as et in saecula saeculorum. Actually the words saecula saeculorum are found throughout the Vulgate Bible.

I also know if a choir was to sing a hymn with 7 verses, even if only there is enough time to sing 4 verses the final verse must be sung if it is the Gloria Patri

Sadly little or none of this has yet to be extended to the OF Mass as far as I know.


#4

One of my very first questions here on the forum way back in 2007 was about the two different English translations of the “Glory Be” that we often come across. Fr. Serpa answered my question:

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=172918

It is basically a matter of translation. There is only the one Latin form of the prayer. But there are two main English renderings. The one that I hear prayed most often ends with “…and ever shall be, world without end.” The one used in the Liturgy of the hours is the more succinct “…and will be forever.” It’s all in how you translate saecula saeculorum.


#5

Ahhhhhhhhh… I see.
Thanks. Translation it is. Makes sense. I’m used to the longer version, it just rolls off my tongue.


#6

The Cistercian monks I have encountered say;

***Glory to the Father
and to the Son’
and to the Holy Spirit
the God who is, who was, and who is to come
at the end of the ages.
Amen. ***

-Tim-


#7

It does sound better without the subjunctive “BE” but I’d extend the “per omnia saecula saeculorum” to before the beginning of time as well.

The whole thing just can’t be translated into English very well. Many languages do retain the “through all ages of ages” concept much better.


#8

Interesting. Another translation. :stuck_out_tongue: I’ve not heard that one before. I like it.


#9

The Cistercian monks near me chant it that way as part of the divine office. I’ve come to love it and just say it that way quietly most times.

I was leading First Friday devotions once and at one point said it loud that way. It just came out. I’ve been saying it that way for years. I knew that I had screwed up even before I finished. Everyone was supposed to say the Glory be with me but they all trailed off and got quiet wondering what I was talking about. :blush:

I was like, “Yeah, sorry, the monks over at the monastery say it that way. Let’s continue.” and just kept going. :shrug:

-Tim-


#10

The only way I know is when it is used in the Holy Rosary -
Said by the person leading the decade:
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit.
Response:
As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

I have never heard any other way.


#11

When praying the Liturgy of the Hours, I always use the “…will be forever” ending, because it’s prescribed.

At every other time, I use the familiar “…world without end” ending.

Personally, I find the “…will be forever” a better rendering that conveys the meaning of “et in saecula saculorom” (and in/to ages of ages), which pretty much means “forever”.


#12

Semper can mean “always, forever.”

Glória Patri, et Fílio, et Spirítui Sancto. Sicut erat in princípio, et nunc, et semper, et in sæcula sæculórum. Amen.

Other languages:

Dutch: Eer aan de Vader, de Zoon en de Heilige Geest. Zoals het was in het begin, nu en altijd, tot in eeuwen der eeuwen. Amen.

French: Gloire au Pére, au Fils et au Saint-Esprit. Comme Il état au commencement, maintenant et toujours pour les siècles des siècles. Amen.

Italian: Gloria al Padre e al Figlio e allo Spirito Santo. Come era nel principio, ora e sempre nei secoli dei secoli. Amen.

Polish: Chwala Ojcu i Synowi i Duchowi Swietemu jak byla na poczatku, teraz i zawsze i na wieki wieków.

Spanish: Gloria al Padre, al Hijo y al Espíritu Santo. Como era en el principio, ahora y siempre, por los siglos de los siglos. Amen.


#13

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