Abram's Life As A Witness To Salvation by Works and Baptism off Desire


#1

Ok:
This is probably a reach but here goes.
Thus Abraham "believed God, and it was reckoned to him as righteousness." 7 So you see that it is men of faith who are the sons of Abraham. (Galatians (RSV) 3)

In Hebrews:39 And all these, though well attested by their faith, did not receive what was promised, 40 since God had foreseen something better for us, that apart from us they should not be made perfect. (Hebrews (RSV) 11)
1 Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with perseverance the race that is set before us, 2 looking to Jesus the pioneer and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God. (Hebrews (RSV) 12)

So here are some thoughts and observations:
1. It is not clear if Abram worshiped 1 God who is the 1 true God. The history of the times presents the times of Abraham as "polytheistic".
2. So concluding Abram being polytheistic, it was by God's grace that Abram responded to God's "invitation."
3. God "revealed" Himself and Abram does not say that the God He was following is the 1 True God so possibly Abram although following God's call was still "polytheistic."
4. Abram was "converted" into Abraham by his obedience and trust in God thus Abram was "righteous" in the eyes of God
5. Abram is honored by St. Paul and was saved through the merits of Jesus Christ without "knowing Him."

So the life of Abraham is a scriptural witness to the validity that a person need not be a "Christian" in order to be deemed righteous" in God's eyes and be saved through the grace granted by God through our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.

It is also a witness to the Baptism of Desire by the Gospel passage referencing David's longing to see that day.

Regards,
Terry Dishneau


#2

I don't think that would hold up, because a non-Catholic would say that because Christ hasn't come yet, the requirements to be deemed righteous were different.


#3

[quote="Terry_Ypsilanti, post:1, topic:316969"]
Ok:
This is probably a reach but here goes.
Thus Abraham "believed God, and it was reckoned to him as righteousness." 7 So you see that it is men of faith who are the sons of Abraham. (Galatians (RSV) 3)

In Hebrews:39 And all these, though well attested by their faith, did not receive what was promised, 40 since God had foreseen something better for us, that apart from us they should not be made perfect. (Hebrews (RSV) 11)
1 Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with perseverance the race that is set before us, 2 looking to Jesus the pioneer and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God. (Hebrews (RSV) 12)

So here are some thoughts and observations:
1. It is not clear if Abram worshiped 1 God who is the 1 true God. The history of the times presents the times of Abraham as "polytheistic".
2. So concluding Abram being polytheistic, it was by God's grace that Abram responded to God's "invitation."
3. God "revealed" Himself and Abram does not say that the God He was following is the 1 True God so possibly Abram although following God's call was still "polytheistic."
4. Abram was "converted" into Abraham by his obedience and trust in God thus Abram was "righteous" in the eyes of God
5. Abram is honored by St. Paul and was saved through the merits of Jesus Christ without "knowing Him."

So the life of Abraham is a scriptural witness to the validity that a person need not be a "Christian" in order to be deemed righteous" in God's eyes and be saved through the grace granted by God through our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.

It is also a witness to the Baptism of Desire by the Gospel passage referencing David's longing to see that day.

Regards,
Terry Dishneau

[/quote]

Many in the OT whom are called righteous can be seen, in some sense, to have a baptism of desire, I suppose. After all, there is salvation only through Christ's Passion, and Scripture is fairly clear it is through baptism that we sacramentally die and rise with him.

However, I'm confused where Abram is polytheistic. My understanding of Jewish antiquity is monotheistic. Whether contemporary religions of the time were polytheistic I don't know would affect Abram.


#4

I have always surmised when Christ descended into Hell to rescue the captives, think Book of Nicodemus, all of the OT "saints" were redeemed.


#5

Thanks for the reply:

In the Catholic Biblical School of Michigan, Abraham is taught to be “polytheistic.” Judaism as a monotheistic religion came after the Exodus.

God focused a great deal of attention on Israel not going after others gods during the journey to the Promised Land.


#6

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