Absolute TORTURE!


#1

Guys,

IT’S TORTURE!!!:crying:

What’s torture you ask?

Not being able to take the Eucharist!!! :crying: You guys have NO CLUE how much I LONG for it!!! :crying: Worse part is, I have to wait until NEXT Easter to take it, probably!!! That’s WAY too long for me!!! :wink:

I went to my RCIA last night and I was talking to this lady about it and she agreed with it that it IS TORTURE!!! She said that her feelings are hurt! LOL!!! But the good news for her is that her family - who is also converting - are able to take it in March this year!! NO FAIR!!! LOL!! :slight_smile:

How can I cope with this and try to calm down? I mean, going to Mass Saturday evenings is great but when I see the people going up to take the Eucharist, my feelings ARE hurt! :crying: Literally! Sometimes I even have the urge to leave during it but I have to force myself to stay. But it’s torture just watching the people get the Eucharist and you can’t yet! It’s like you’re dying of thrist and you can’t drink for a whole year! Well, that’s a stupid comparision but it’s kinda the same concept!

What can I do to cope with this and wait? I mean, is this good or bad in the long run?


#2

[quote=Paris Blues]Guys,

IT’S TORTURE!!!:crying:

What’s torture you ask?

Not being able to take the Eucharist!!! :crying: You guys have NO CLUE how much I LONG for it!!! :crying: Worse part is, I have to wait until NEXT Easter to take it, probably!!! That’s WAY too long for me!!! :wink:

I went to my RCIA last night and I was talking to this lady about it and she agreed with it that it IS TORTURE!!! She said that her feelings are hurt! LOL!!! But the good news for her is that her family - who is also converting - are able to take it in March this year!! NO FAIR!!! LOL!! :slight_smile:

How can I cope with this and try to calm down? I mean, going to Mass Saturday evenings is great but when I see the people going up to take the Eucharist, my feelings ARE hurt! :crying: Literally! Sometimes I even have the urge to leave during it but I have to force myself to stay. But it’s torture just watching the people get the Eucharist and you can’t yet! It’s like you’re dying of thrist and you can’t drink for a whole year! Well, that’s a stupid comparision but it’s kinda the same concept!

What can I do to cope with this and wait? I mean, is this good or bad in the long run?

[/quote]

You don’t specify why you are having to wait. I assume from your post that your are already Baptized. Adult Baptism is the ONLY reason one is required to wait for the Easter Vigil. A Baptized Candidate is “Received into Full Communion” as soon as possible. A dely might be caused by an Annulment or a particular difficulty with a Church teaching. But as soon as these are resolved the Candidate should be Received.


#3

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]You don’t specify why you are having to wait. I assume from your post that your are already Baptized. Adult Baptism is the ONLY reason one is required to wait for the Easter Vigil. A Baptized Candidate is “Received into Full Communion” as soon as possible. A dely might be caused by an Annulment or a particular difficulty with a Church teaching. But as soon as these are resolved the Candidate should be Received.
[/quote]

I’m sorry…I should’ve been more specific! I’m in the RCIA program…yes, I was baptized in a Protestant church. So I have to wait to convert. Make sense? :wink:


#4

[quote=Paris Blues]I’m sorry…I should’ve been more specific! I’m in the RCIA program…yes, I was baptized in a Protestant church. So I have to wait to convert. Make sense? :wink:
[/quote]

Something does not add up. I was babtized as an infant in a Protestant church. I entered RCIA in October 2001 and was received into the Catholic Church in full communion during the Easter Vigil of 2002.

Assuming you joined RCIA when you should have in 2004, you should be participating at the Easter Vigil 2005. Something does not make sense.


#5

[quote=Paris Blues]I’m sorry…I should’ve been more specific! I’m in the RCIA program…yes, I was baptized in a Protestant church. So I have to wait to convert. Make sense? :wink:
[/quote]

Actually, this is incorrect. Since you’ve been baptized, you CAN be given the Sacraments of Reconciliation and then the Eucharist as soon as your Priest determines you’ve been properly catechized and are ready to receive them. You can then be confirmed at a later date. It is up to him, not an RCIA schedule. Now, after talking with you, he may determine it would be appropriate for you to continue your catechesis for quite some time before he is willing to give you the Eucharist. I would recommend that you speak to him immediately. I know about this, because I’ve gone through the same exact thing.


#6

Paris,
It is a beautiful thing to see someone who loves the Eucharist as much as you do. Just be glad that it’s a short year and that Lent begins on Feb 9th. You sound like a bride longing to be one with her groom. In the meantime,do you know the prayer for a spiritual communion? One saint was told in a vision by Jesus that he found both kinds equally pleasing. It’s always a matter of the condition of your heart, and yours longs for deep communion with Jesus. Hang in my sister!
Pax vobiscum,


#7

[quote=FrankR]Something does not add up. I was babtized as an infant in a Protestant church. I entered RCIA in October 2001 and was received into the Catholic Church in full communion during the Easter Vigil of 2002.

Assuming you joined RCIA when you should have in 2004, you should be participating at the Easter Vigil 2005. Something does not make sense.
[/quote]

Well, I started RCIA in December 2004 so I don’t know if I’ll be ready!


#8

Paris, First I commend you on what you are doing! Think, Christ made a BIG BIG sacrifice for you and I.

You may have heard to offer up pain, sickness or mental torture up for the souls in purgatory, maybe not.

The idea is that when you suffer or fast you are giving to Jesus a small but important part of yourself.

Jesus knows how you feel! He will reward you for waiting! You will be stronger for suffering!


#9

[quote=Exporter]Paris, First I commend you on what you are doing! Think, Christ made a BIG BIG sacrifice for you and I.

You may have heard to offer up pain, sickness or mental torture up for the souls in purgatory, maybe not.

The idea is that when you suffer or fast you are giving to Jesus a small but important part of yourself.

Jesus knows how you feel! He will reward you for waiting! You will be stronger for suffering!
[/quote]

HUH??? What do you mean by that?
:confused:


#10

A good thing, much akin to the bride anxiously awaiting her wedding day to consumate her love with her beloved. Onlyin this case, you are awaiting the day when you can enjoin a fuller spiritual union with your Beloved. Try reading the book of Songs of Songs for the anticipation and right timing of consumating love’s union.


#11

I went through the EXACT same thing as you did. The wait was torture…

Then one of my friends reminded me that I should view the wait like an engagement for marriage. The wait is long and hard, but the rewards and happiness well makes up for it.


#12

I am also in RCIA. At this time in my life (I’m 50), the Church recognizes that I am a baby in Christ. And in many regards, it is true. There was so much that I did not know. There is much more to learn about things that I thought I already knew.

So it is that we are being cared for. I took my son to a Cub Scout meeting last night. You know what? I think most of the cub scouts at the meeting only notice and interact with each other most of the time. And yet so many adults are involved with making sure everything goes all right. I drive my son to the meeting. I helped with some chairs. And watched the meeting and then took him home. While he was getting in or out of the car, I was watching some for his safety. Why tell all about that?

Because I think it is so much like how we ignore our Gardian Angels. Or how we ignore the Saints in heaven that watch over and intercede on our behalf. And how little we contemplate on how God is in control.

If I was allowed to partake of the Holy Sacraments up until now, I would easily have made more of a mess than I cleaned up. For example, going to confession (and holding back from confessing a whopper) can result in a new mortal sin. Taking Holy Communion improperly can result in illness or death (1 Cor 11:27-29). Receiving the Holy Sacraments requires proper intention.

It is better for us that Christ personally cares for us, with the care of the Church and with his other provisions.

Look at CCC #1475-1476. #1475 “… recourse to the communion of saints lets the contrite sinner be more promptly and efficaciously purified of the punishments for sin.” Note that punishments is plural. To me that means both the “eternal punishment” and the “temporal punishment”. Learned Catholic Brothers, is my thinking right about this observation?

#1476 “We also call these spiritual goods of the communion of saints the Church’s treasury…”.

And look at the very first beatitude.

Matthew 6:3 (Jesus speaking) Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

I suppose the first beatitude is what first meets us as we first come into the Catholic Church seeking to repent and get ourselves right with God. So take comfort in that as well.

Keep your heart on Jesus. Also keep looking to Mary.

Do not despair. Have faith in God. God is in control.

I am only in RCIA. If any Catholic brother thinks I am in error, please let me know.

jmm08


#13

Well, I finally went up and got a blessing…not by the priest but by some lady who was giving the Eucharist…she only smiled friendly at me and put her hand on my arm…does this count as a blessing?


#14

No only a priest can give a blessing. Can you compare your waiting for full communion with Christ and His church to the waiting the engaged couple does, and their longing for full sexual union blessed by marriage. They know that they are physically capable of performing the marriage act before it is “time” but they understand the dangers of doing so before they are ready, and the enormous blessings and graces that await them by waiting for the proper "time and season’ as Ecclesiastes says.


#15

Well, I tried to get into the line where the priest was (there were two lines and whichever side you sat on in the pews, that’s the line you would have to follow) but I realized I was walking in the middle of the aisle and felt like a total geek! :frowning: I mean, I couldn’t just butt in front of people and since we were already walking up, there was nothing I could do but just stay. I would probably have to sit on the other side of the pews, eh? LOL!


#16

This refers to the temporal punishments due to sin, not to the eternal punishments due to sin.

CCC 1473 The forgiveness of sin and restoration of communion with God entail the remission of the eternal punishment of sin, but temporal punishment of sin remains.

Confession remits the eternal punishment due to mortal sin and brings us back into communion with God (venial sins, by definition, do not entail eternal punishment, nor do venial sins sever our communion with God).

The CCC teaches that temporal punishment due to sin “must not be conceived of as a kind of vengeance inflicted by God from without, but as following from the very nature of sin. A conversion which proceeds from a fervent charity can attain the complete purification of the sinner in such a way that no punishment would remain.” (CCC 1472).

IOW, when we confess moral sin, the eternal punishment due those sins is immediately remitted. But even though we may sincerely repent of our sins, it doesn’t necessarily mean that we are instantly transformed by a sincere confession into saints that no longer have any attachment to sin.

I have never heard anyone teach about what happened to the prodigal son after the party was over. The prodigal son had been living a dissolute life. He finally came to repentance after he had ruined his life and was suffering the consequences of his sins. The father welcomed the prodigal son back home with a party when he returned home as a repentant sinner. Our Father in Heaven welcomes us back into communion with him and into reconciliation with his Church when we too repent of our sins. After confession of our mortal sins, we too can eat once again at the banquet of the Eucharist. But a dissolute life of sin is has its consequences, and breaking the bad habits of a sinful life, and developing virtues to replace the bad habits requires a willingness to work on our part. When the prodigal son came back to the farm, he had get back to working the fields after the party was over. No more getting up late after a night of drinking and carousing!

Prodigal sons can get help from the saints in Heaven, because unlike the elder son, the saints in heaven also rejoice when a prodigal son repents of his sins. The saints in heaven are glad to help us when we seek their intercession.

“I tell you, there is joy before the angels of God over one sinner who repents."
Luke 15:10

Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with perseverance the race that is set before us
Hebrews 12:1


#17

[quote=Paris Blues]Well, I started RCIA in December 2004 so I don’t know if I’ll be ready!
[/quote]

If you only started RCIA in December 2004, you haven’t had that much time for a thorough catechesis. Those who are running your RCIA program have a duty to make sure you actually understand what the Catholic Church teaches before you ask to come in communion with the Church. A person that receives communion needs to be in union with the Church, and one of the marks of unity is believing everything that the Catholic Church teaches.

From the questions that you post on this board, it seems to me that you are still in the process of learning what the Catholic Church teaches. Keep asking your questions! :thumbsup: I am sure that there are many here praying for you to be received into full communion with the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church. :gopray2:


#18

[quote=puzzleannie]No only a priest can give a blessing. Hi Puzzleannie. Now that news to me. Where did you come up with that information. I believe you are in error. :confused: God Bless
[/quote]


#19

Only a priest can give or bestow a blessing in the name of the Church. Anyone can say God bless you, but this is only asking a blessing for you. Only a priest can officially bless a person. One other note, a lay person should never ever extend their right hand and make the sign of the cross over some one because that is reserved for the Priest by the virtue of his Holy Orders. There is an official book of blessings that outline certain things that a lay person can do but it is very few.


#20

I recommend the following prayer whenever a Catholic or non-Catholic is to canonically refrain from receiving of the Holy Eucharist:

My Jesus,
I believe that You
are present in the Most Holy Sacrament.
I love You above all things,
and I desire to receive You into my soul.
Since I cannot at this moment
receive You sacramentally,
come at least spiritually into my heart. I embrace You as if You were already there and unite myself wholly to You. Never permit me to be separated from You.
Amen.


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