Absolutely the best book to give to a Protestant is


#1

Catholic Christianity by Peter Kreeft. The most gentle, clearly worded, concise, explanation of what the Catholic Church teaches while at the same time addressing some protestant objections. It basically is a work that follows the CCC.

amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0898707986/qid=1104880127/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl/702-8336457-9968047


#2

i’d second anything by kreeft. he’s brilliant. ‘a refutation of moral relativism’ is probably the best book to give to a non christian. at least, it’s one of them.


#3

Perhaps, as a follow up, Catholicism For Dummies by Frs Trigilio and Brighenti. This book follows the For Dummies format and presents the truths of the Catholic Church in a non technical, easy to follow way. Both priests are rock solid in the Faith.


#4

It really depends on their denomination.

For my Christian Church (Church of Christ split-off) Mother in law I went with ‘Born Fundamentalist, Born-Again Catholic’. She’s reading it now…we’ll see what happens (she was one of those ‘Catholics aren’t Christian’ people…)

I can’t remember the author…(and I’m too lazy too look it up right now, sorry!).


#5

The difference between this book and all the others, is how it is so systematic. For Example, Chapter 1 is about Faith. It is broken down into 15 subsections:

  1. Why we need faith
  2. THe role of faith in religion
  3. The act of faith and the object of faith
    .
    .
    .
  4. Faith and scripture
  5. Faith and Church Authority
  6. Faith and Freedom
    .
    .
  7. Faith as a Gift of God
    .
  8. Faith and Love
  9. Faith and works
  10. Faith and reason

ETC
.


#6

[quote=Isidore_AK]It really depends on their denomination.

For my Christian Church (Church of Christ split-off) Mother in law I went with ‘Born Fundamentalist, Born-Again Catholic’. She’s reading it now…we’ll see what happens (she was one of those ‘Catholics aren’t Christian’ people…)

I can’t remember the author.(David Currie)…(and I’m too lazy too look it up right now, sorry!).
[/quote]

Amen!
I have given this to COC members.
This is an Excellent Book also.
Read many of the 4- reviews here:*
amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/089870569X/103-3149596-5623841?v=glance


#7

See this parallel thread also:

[forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=31014](“http://forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=31014”)

http://forums.catholic.com/images/statusicon_cad/thread_new.gif Best Book defending the Catholic faith


#8

Steve Kellmeyer’s

http://a1055.g.akamai.net/f/1055/1401/5h/images.barnesandnoble.com/images/6040000/6046802.gif
Bible Basics ($20.00) in 8x11 format.

Bible Basics: An Introductory Study Guide to the Catholic Faith
campusi.com/bookFind/asp…odId=1930314000
This is the one I walk any prot through.
Remember, the Catechism for a prot (so he says) is the Bible. This book addresses them in that way, along with the Church fathers.

Determining which book to give
Here’s a clue:
[left]
BEFORE you enter into an apologetic encounter!

  1. Make sure the person has an inquiring mindset.
    ie (why do you want to know?)
  2. Find out their true objection(s)
    Now, these are the objections that, if resolved, they would consider the True Church of Christ.
    You MUST get them to commit to a very limited specific set, and stay with it. No meandering.
    “What exactly is your PRIMARY objection to the Catholic Church.” (it’s unbiblical is not specific enough.) Must have “for Instance”
  3. Ask them questions, don’t just play defense. No one scores on defense unless the other guy fumbles.
    “If I could resolve this question, and get your agreement, would you persue a real interest in the Church?”

In addition, some of the early tapes by Tim Staples on Mary are terrific! They really set a prot to thinking. He can listen to them over and over in private, when a defensive posture is seldom present.[/left]
[left] [/left]


#9

If you give them Catholic Christianity by Kreeft you have to give them the Cathechism it is mean to complement the cathechism not replace it! If you give them both books they provide an excellent 1-2 punch!


#10

Green Eggs and Ham

-give it some thought.


#11

A Navarre Bible

Catechism of the Catholic Church

Not a book, a CD available from Catholicity, “The Conversion of Scott Hahn”


#12

anyone care for a protestant opinion? i am a 33 year old mom of three. i received my bachelor’s degree in Biblical studies from a pentecostal Bible college. i have been working for a religious order of Catholic sisters for the past four years. our staff provides care for these “retired” nuns in their later years. it has been the best education one could ever receive on Catholic faith and practice.

i don’t feel like i would ever take the leap to change my core worldview just from reading a book written by a priest or scholar. i could certainly be influenced by a great writing, but it would most likely not persuade me to change my faith from protestant to catholic. if i ever did choose to change the practice of my faith in such a drastic way, it would be because i had been influenced by a large group of people that were practicing their faith in a way that seemed more effective to me…in a way that seemed to make more sense than my practice. i would have to come to the conclusion that they were living according to the truth, and that i was living in error. that has not yet happened.

in my four years with the sisters, i have been deeply impressed by certain nuns. they have shared wisdom with me and been extremely patient with my protestant ignorance (as you might perceive it to be). certain sisters have pleaded with me in asking, “how can you partake of the eucharist?” others, when i directly asked them, “do you think i should become catholic?” have given very gentle answers and assured me that God will be the one to lead my life as long as i am seeking Him with my whole heart.

i would encourage you to examine your motives when giving books to protestants. make sure that you are sharing from a place of trust and not panic. by this i mean, leave the outcome firmly placed in the hands of God and trust Him to handle the details. don’t panic if you have friends and loved ones who don’t agree with you 100%. if God wants them to be in the Catholic faith, He will lead them there by his mighty hand.

people are very strongly influnced by human interaction. let a protestant get close to you. invite them into your home. let them see how you practice your faith on a daily basis. let us see that it is more than religious rhetoric. show us up close that it is a living devotion to the kingdom of God. let us see how you deal with stress, and bills, and family dischord. be gentle and kind. try not to come at it from a condescending perspective.

that’s my advice. perhaps a little to existential…a little too emotional. but it’s heartfelt.


#13

[quote=Stef]anyone care for a protestant opinion? i am a 33 year old mom of three. i received my bachelor’s degree in Biblical studies from a pentecostal Bible college. i have been working for a religious order of Catholic sisters for the past four years. our staff provides care for these “retired” nuns in their later years. it has been the best education one could ever receive on Catholic faith and practice.

i don’t feel like i would ever take the leap to change my core worldview just from reading a book written by a priest or scholar. i could certainly be influenced by a great writing, but it would most likely not persuade me to change my faith from protestant to catholic. if i ever did choose to change the practice of my faith in such a drastic way, it would be because i had been influenced by a large group of people that were practicing their faith in a way that seemed more effective to me…in a way that seemed to make more sense than my practice. i would have to come to the conclusion that they were living according to the truth, and that i was living in error. that has not yet happened.

in my four years with the sisters, i have been deeply impressed by certain nuns. they have shared wisdom with me and been extremely patient with my protestant ignorance (as you might perceive it to be). certain sisters have pleaded with me in asking, “how can you partake of the eucharist?” others, when i directly asked them, “do you think i should become catholic?” have given very gentle answers and assured me that God will be the one to lead my life as long as i am seeking Him with my whole heart.

i would encourage you to examine your motives when giving books to protestants. make sure that you are sharing from a place of trust and not panic. by this i mean, leave the outcome firmly placed in the hands of God and trust Him to handle the details. don’t panic if you have friends and loved ones who don’t agree with you 100%. if God wants them to be in the Catholic faith, He will lead them there by his mighty hand.

people are very strongly influnced by human interaction. let a protestant get close to you. invite them into your home. let them see how you practice your faith on a daily basis. let us see that it is more than religious rhetoric. show us up close that it is a living devotion to the kingdom of God. let us see how you deal with stress, and bills, and family dischord. be gentle and kind. try not to come at it from a condescending perspective.

that’s my advice. perhaps a little to existential…a little too emotional. but it’s heartfelt.
[/quote]

I thought that was amazing. The reason for this book is because of the Charity it displays. It sticks to explaining what the Catholic Church teaches without rhetoric, and relies heavily on the Catechism.


closed #14

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