Absolution vs Forgiveness - Purgatory


#1

Regarding this thread:

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=406160

"Absolution is the juridic act of the Church by/through which sins are remitted/removed and/or the punishment due to sin is likewise removed."

We receive absolution from a Priest. Now, if I understand this correctly, we do not suffer further in Purgatory for this sin? I tend to believe this is the case as our sins are forgiven and we are absolved when we confess before a Priest. I have heard two different explanations but would appreciate if anyone would correct this if they know the answer.


#2

When we sin we must:
1: Realize we’ve sinned.
2. Ask for forgiveness
3.Pay for the damage
4. Become Holy.

We can suffer for sins that were already forgiven, but if we suffer on earth before that then we don’t have to suffer for it anymore.

I hope you understand what I’m saying.

God Bless!:tiphat:


#3

The sacrament of reconciliation removes the ETERNAL consequences of sin. It makes you right with God and is your way of accepting back the gift of salvation you threw away when you committed mortal sin.

This has nothing to do with Purgatory

Doing penance has to do with purgatory.

Purgatory is the the cleansing of our attachment to sin as well as our temporal consequences of sin.

The temporal consequences are not eternal , it is the real way our lives affect others.

This is a great analogy from Catholic Answers:
*
Let’s say you kill somebody, and go to confession and are forgiven. But you have to pay the consequences of that sin…you sit in jail for a very long time. That MAY meet God’s justice, and if you don’t pay now, you will pay later.

Let’s say you throw a rock through my window. You repent, go to confession, are forgiven, and get absolution. Jesus paid for your sin. But what about my window? Does Jesus pay for it? No, that’s your responsibility. Paying for the window is the temporal punishment for throwing a rock through it.
But what about all the “broken windows” we did not get around to paying for in our lives, metaphorically speaking? God’s justice needs to be satisfied, and that is why there is purgatory. Temporal punishment occurs in this life, or the next. And God is so loving He accepts our prayers in lieu of after-death purification.*

I have also written a lot about this on my blog if you are interested .

findingthecatholicchurch.blogspot.com/2013/03/purgatory-part-2-what-about-temporal.html


#4

You didn’t tell us where the quote comes from. I was unaware that absolution removes all of the temporal punishment due to sin.


#5

“Absolution” removes the penalty of eternal damnation. “Purgation” (in Purgatory) is the process of repairing a soul damaged by sin in preparation for viewing God.

One must be absolved of all sin first to be purged of all imperfections.


#6

It doesn’t.


#7

If you drop dead immediately after baptism you will go straight to Heaven.
If you drop dead immediately after absolution you will be saved (Heaven or Purgatory first).


#8

[quote="Jon_S, post:3, topic:344775"]
The sacrament of reconciliation removes the ETERNAL consequences of sin. It makes you right with God and is your way of accepting back the gift of salvation you threw away when you committed mortal sin.

This has nothing to do with Purgatory

[/quote]

For clarification --it also has to do with Purgatory....that is the Sacrament does.


#9

After a good confession…will there remain some “temporal punishment” for sin up to that point?

Often.

One will often need further purification of such.

And since you bring up purgatory it is important to note that the “purification” we call purgatory - would involve not only “temporal punishment” -it is a matter of purifying our holiness for heaven. One can say the love of Jesus -the fire of his love purifies us more – conforms us to himself - (by his death and resurrection) he finishes the purification so we may be with him in heaven (where nothing not pure enters…) -and then in the Resurrection!


#10

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.