Account: "Forced to Bake Cake Today, Forced to Assist at Suicide Tomorrow


#1

A series of U.S. courts have ruled against a baker who was taken to court because he would not make a wedding case for a gay couple. Now this matter is before the U.S. Supreme Court. If the Supreme Court rules against this baker, the article maintains, it will undermine the ability of religious people to refuse to carry out acts that their conscience will not allow in other areas of vital interest.

“Such compelled acts could (and already have, in a few cases) require doctors and nurses to participate in controversial procedures or interventions such as abortion and assisted suicides, prescribe and/or dispense contraception, provide assisted reproduction procedures and therapies made from human embryonic or fetal stem cells, perform sex change surgeries, etc. against their religious or moral beliefs.”


#2

Disturbing, but feasible…


#3

Disturbing indeed! I wonder what Canada would do in these scenarios


#4

People need to be more innovative! Instead of saying “No I will not perform this action!” just don’t show up or walk out feigning illness. Baking a cake :birthday:? “Hmmm let me check the schedule…nope we’re full”. How do people get out of work? By not showing up :smile: Insubordination is one thing; however, being slow and unreliable is another.


#5

Where I am from I’d see little plaques saying they can refuse service to anyone for any reason. Is this just a lie?


#6

Better to come off incompetent and ambiguous than participate in a sin or questionable job. At least it gives you time to reevaluate your situation.


#7

I don’t think this cake baking case could be a precedent for a future assisted suicide case, and here is why. This present case turns on the issue of providing a service to some people and not to others. On the other side, the baker says it is a different service than the one he usually provides, so he says it is not discrimination against specific people but discrimination against performing a different service from the one his business is set up for. If the court does rule against the baker, they will undoubtably do it on the grounds that they see the baking of a cake for a same-sex wedding as essentially the same service as baking any other wedding cake. (Not that I would agree with such a finding…)

That being their basis, let’s look at a potential assisted suicide case. If a doctor claims that suicide is not what he does, then the court would have a hard time holding that assisted suicide is “essentially the same service” as anything else that doctor does. It is just too different. So I think the doctor would certain win that case, unless some totally different basis is used for the decision having nothing to do with this present baker case.


#8

I’d have done this, the same way as I have had people who did not want to take my phone calls in the past be “in a meeting” for three straight months. :smiley:
But I guess Jack the Baker wanted to be honest and stand up for his faith. I can’t fault that even if it did cause the customers to start screaming swear words and run out making obscene gestures.


#9

I’ve read a bit about both arguments.

The Christian side is worried that their religious freedoms will be limited if the court rules in favour for the gay couple. Christians would have to cater to same sex marriages even if it goes against their beliefs.

The opposed side (LGBTQ community) is worried that if the court rules in favour for the Baker. LGBTQ people will be discriminated against. And not only them. If the law says that people can discriminate based on their religious beliefs. Then refusing service to a mixed race couple could also be acceptable (If it’s someone’s religious beliefs).

The Court needs to draw a line between when it’s ok to discriminate, and when it’s not. Voting in favour of either will cause serious ramifications. Don’t you think?


#10

I plan on going to college for nursing, and if faced with any of these, I will simply refuse. I will not do anything listed above, even if it means losing my job or even going to court for it.


#11

WELL maybe NOT actually ASSIST; but a legislated “clap & be happy” seems possible.

I’m 73 and CAN"T believe that I am part of the world that we are leaving our KIDS.

What happened to Moral OUTRAGE?:thinking::persevere::disappointed


#12

I think no matter which way the decision goes there will be an uproar.
I think the baker is wrong when he says baking a cake for someone whose beliefs he disagrees with is ‘essentially different from’ baking cake for someone he doesn’t disagree with.
Now if the customers wanted him to cater the wedding supper he could reasonably reply “I’m a baker, not a caterer. What you want is essentially different from what I normally do for my customers.”

I think the people who worry about doctors being forced to perform abortions have a legitimate point. There is such a thing as a slippery slope. Religious or civil rights can be chipped away over years or decades.

Making a baker bake a gay wedding cake sounds like a small thing. Perhaps it is a small thing. But twenty or thirty years from now it might prove to have been an early step on the road that leads to a doctor being told to perform an abortion or be sent to prison.

Editing to add: Also I think it’s relevant to ask whether there were other bakers within easy reach who would have baked the gay wedding cake without protest.


#13

Yes, I agree with you. Where the line will be drawn between religious freedom and discrimination will be interesting to see. I am happy the Supreme Court is hearing the casee.


#14

image


#15

If you are in the US, then, yes.

“We don’t serve colored people here,” won’t fly, despite that plaque.


#16

But I don’t think they’d even have to tell you the reason. Pretty sure it’s mainly for those who are rude or dressed improperly but still


#17

I think the burden of proof is on the customer to show that they were refused service for an illegal reason. But if every black customer is turned away then it shouldn’t be hard to convince a court.


#18

I don’t think it will take 20 years. It’s coming a lot sooner than that. If the AMA or some medical society adds assisted suicide to its list of approved medical procedures, physicians may lose their license for refusing to do it.


#19

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