Adoption


#1

Now I know the Church says that for adoption that only a married couple (man and woman) should adopt, but what if there is say a death in the family and an unmarried family member is willing to adopt the child. Is the unmarried family member allowed to adopt or should the child go into an orphanage. I personally think that the Church would prefer the family member to adopt, but am unsure.

Anyone know?


#2

As far as I know there is no prhibition on single adults adopting children. Where is this in Canon Law or such?

While a complete family is best, it’s not always availble. Better a single parent than non at all. By your reasoning if a person loses their spouse they should also lose their kids as they are no longer able to parent without a spouse?


#3

[quote="Dakota_Roberts, post:1, topic:250817"]
Now I know the Church says that for adoption that only a married couple (man and woman) should adopt,?

[/quote]

I know of no such law although of course it is always advisible and in the best interests of the child, but obviously if an appropriate arrangement can be made with a family member that is preferable and the Church has no problem with it.


#4

I didn’t say it was canon…

No, only for adoption, obviously if a spouse dies they are still fine to take care of the kids, but say if the last parent dies or both die.

Ah, I just thought that was the position since many of Catholic adoption services seem to be not so warm on having single parents adopt.


#5

[quote="Dakota_Roberts, post:4, topic:250817"]
I

Ah, I just thought that was the position since many of Catholic adoption services seem to be not so warm on having single parents adopt.

[/quote]

adoption agencies in general prefer intact married couples to single adoptive parents because studies have proven without question it is better for the children, and the younger they are the more essential it is. Since the culture is changing and most of the children available for adoption are older, and may in some if not many cases, actually be better of in with a single parent who has no other children, agencies take that into account. What Catholic adoption agencies refuse to support is adoption by unrelated adults who live together in a situation contrary to God's law, since that situation by definition endangers the welfare of the child.


#6

It's difficult for me to picture this ever even coming up, because a relative of the child could adopt the child through the court system without the intevention of any adoption agency, Catholic or otherwise. It would be very unusual if somehow the child ended up with the adoption agency when a relative was willing to adopt.


#7

First choice is almost always to have the child raised by a family member. The position of Catholic adoption services applies only when there is not a suitable family member to adopt.

Even the Catholic system will allow singles to adopt, especially with special-needs children - at least in our diocese. But the preference is always to have the child go to a family with both an adoptive mother and father.

The strife you see in the news, for example, is when some advocacy group wants the adoption service to give equal preference to married couples and singles.


#8

[quote="Alix1912, post:2, topic:250817"]
As far as I know there is no prhibition on single adults adopting children. Where is this in Canon Law or such?

While a complete family is best, it's not always availble. Better a single parent than non at all. By your reasoning if a person loses their spouse they should also lose their kids as they are no longer able to parent without a spouse?

[/quote]

I would like to know that as well???? As I considered adoption as a single parent at one time but it's not a possibility for me because of financial reasons. I hope someday it's an option though. I've even heard of some nuns and priests were allowed to adopt though that's very rare.


#9

[quote="Luvz2travel, post:8, topic:250817"]
I would like to know that as well???? As I considered adoption as a single parent at one time but it's not a possibility for me because of financial reasons. I hope someday it's an option though. I've even heard of some nuns and priests were allowed to adopt though that's very rare.

[/quote]

Yes, single people can adopt. There is nothing wrong with being single and adopting, as long as you follow the rules of the Church with regards to chastity, etc.

Catholic adoption agencies won't adopt to a single who is cohabitating with someone.


#10

Funny I was just thinking about this the other night. There are many agencies internationally who do allow the adoption of children by single parents for those who are interested. The reason they allow these children to be adopted is because they are often classified as special needs due to a cleft palate, HIV positive, etc. For those who are interested Reece's Rainbow has a lot of good information and links to agencies who will work with single parents or families who are looking to adopt.
reecesrainbow.org/


#11

[quote="Luvz2travel, post:8, topic:250817"]
As I considered adoption as a single parent at one time but it's not a possibility for me because of financial reasons.

[/quote]

Do you know that most adoptive parents who adopt domestically receive a subsidy, and medical coverage for the child? We could never have adopted without that.


#12

[quote="Viki63, post:11, topic:250817"]
Do you know that most adoptive parents who adopt domestically receive a subsidy, and medical coverage for the child? We could never have adopted without that.

[/quote]

Do you mean within the family or the country?


#13

Within the country. If you adopt a child who’s in foster care, under most circumstances you can receive adoption support. There are many children in foster care who need adoptive homes, from babies to teenagers.


#14

You might want to post a source on that. Currently we have foster children and get $20 a day to feed cloth and care for them. If we were to adopt these children the $20 a day stops. I’m not saying its not the case, its just that I haven’t heard of it being the case.

If we were to adopt a child from the foster system (in Kansas) the child qualifies for certain special benefits, reduced (or free) college tuition (to a Kansas public college) and other certain other “benefits” that I don’t recall at this time.

Once adopted the family will qualify for “normal” social services such as welfare and WIC if their income falls into that range.


#15

[quote="Dakota_Roberts, post:1, topic:250817"]
Now I know the Church says that for adoption that only a married couple (man and woman) should adopt, but what if there is say a death in the family and an unmarried family member is willing to adopt the child. Is the unmarried family member allowed to adopt or should the child go into an orphanage. I personally think that the Church would prefer the family member to adopt, but am unsure.

Anyone know?

[/quote]

You are clinging to false "information."

There is no such ruling against single people adopting -
not within the Church and not within the States.


#16

[quote="SamH, post:14, topic:250817"]
You might want to post a source on that. Currently we have foster children and get $20 a day to feed cloth and care for them. If we were to adopt these children the $20 a day stops. I'm not saying its not the case, its just that I haven't heard of it being the case.

If we were to adopt a child from the foster system (in Kansas) the child qualifies for certain special benefits, reduced (or free) college tuition (to a Kansas public college) and other certain other "benefits" that I don't recall at this time.

Once adopted the family will qualify for "normal" social services such as welfare and WIC if their income falls into that range.

[/quote]

'

families4children.com/adopt_myths.cfm
"In addition, the Adoption Assistance Program (AAP) is a federally funded program that provides financial assistance for eligible adoptive children who have special needs. Special needs includes children over 8 years old, children of minority or ethnic groups, children with cognitive, emotional or physical disabilities and children with histories that put them at risk for special needs. Children remain eligible for AAP through their 18th birthday."

I don't know how up to date this is, but we do receive benefits. I was told in the beginning -- by a community advocate, NOT a social worker, that the SW will not mention the subsidy because they prefer not to have to pay it. Special needs children included older children, which in our state was considered anyone over 2, I believe. Our kids are also minorities and considered to have attachment issues -- not unusual. And we have needed the help, believe me.
You might ask the social worker if there are federal subsidies your children qualify for. It only makes sense that there should be - it's in many children's best interest to be adopted rather than remain foster children until 18.


#17

nacac.org/adoptionsubsidy/stateprofiles/kansas.html

This is a link to the Kansas state subsidy profile.


#18

This is just my impression from what I see on TV. But, (I am Canadian), it appears that a lot of mother's who are giving their child up for adoption in the US get to choose the parents.

I can't help but think if a single mom is going to give her kid up, of course she would prefer a married couple. If as a single woman she does not feel competent to raise the kid alone, she would not trust another single mom to do it

Just a though

CM


#19

[quote="Viki63, post:11, topic:250817"]
Do you know that most adoptive parents who adopt domestically receive a subsidy, and medical coverage for the child? We could never have adopted without that.

[/quote]

Not in Missouri. All those where cut out in the last few years or are very limited. I work 2 jobs to get by and can't see that as fair to a child not having the time to be there I mean.


#20

If a pregnant woman chooses an adoption plan for her child, she can choose the adoptive parents. However if a child is in the foster care system, it’s usually because something prevents the parents from taking care of him or her, (drug addiction, mental problems, being incarcerated . . .). Then they don’t get to choose, the state takes over and the child becomes a ward of the state.


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