adventis verses sunday worship

i need some information to give to an adventis friend about why catholics go to church on sundays. she says that the bible states that the sabbath which is saturday should be kept.

If we go back to the Sabbath controversies in the Gospels it would not be difficult to realize that the question debated between Jesus and the Jewish leaders was not whether it was necessary to keep the Sabbath but how the Sabbath was to be observed.
A brief look at the Gospel of Luke, written to Gentile Christians, supports our main argument. The word “Sabbath” appears in Luke twenty-one times and eight additional times in Acts. Luke introduces (4:16) and closes Jesus ministry (23:54) with references to the Sabbath and then adds that the women rested on the Sabbath “according to the commandment” (23:56). Luke describes Jesus and his followers as habitual Sabbath keepers. If we examine the Sabbath controversies in the Gospel it would not be difficult to identify one of the key issues in the discussions. In 6:2 the Pharisees asked Jesus, “Why do you do what is not lawful on the Sabbath?” In the second incident recorded in 6:6-11, Jesus asked the Pharisees, “I ask you, is it lawful to do good or to do harm on the Sabbath?” In both cases the concern is proper Sabbath observance and not whether the Sabbath should be kept or not. The same applies to the Sabbath controversies that are unique to Luke. In 13:16 Jesus asked, “Should she not have been released from this bond on the Sabbath day?,” implying that it was lawful to heal her on the Sabbath. In the final case, recorded in 14:1-6, we find the more traditional question, “Is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath, or not?” It is obvious that with respect to the Sabbath the fundamental issue was defining proper Sabbath observance.
When Jesus says in Luke 6:5, “The Son of man is Lord of the Sabbath” Luke is saying that he has “the right to authoritatively represent the divine intention for the sabbath. . . . In this new situation the Son of Man is able to open up the full potential of the sabbath as God’s gift to humankind.” The Sabbath is for him a day of liberation from suffering and needs, a channel for loving actions. The references to the Sabbath in the gospels clearly show that the Christian communities were concerned about it. One could argue that perhaps the issue was whether one should or should not observe the Sabbath, or a conflict between the church and the synagogue, but the evidence clearly supports the conviction that the Gospels are instructing Jews and Gentile Christians on how to keep the Sabbath.
The New Testament contains irrefutable evidence to the effect that Jesus and his disciples observed the seventh day Sabbath. It is also clear that the Jewish Christian communities also kept the Sabbath during the apostolic period. Jesus, according to the Gospels, observed the Sabbath and made it a day in which he brought rest to the sick

Start by knowing who you’re dealing with: Seventh Day Adventists Then look at the issue: Sabbath or Sunday
This thread and this post

As to your sabbath question: (My best friend is SDA, so we talk). Here is a scripture that clearly says that Christ rose on the first day of the week. You can go back to the beginning of this chapter and will readily see that Mark says that all this occurred on the first day of the week.

Mark 16:9 “But he rising early the first day of the week, appeared first to Mary Magdalen, out of whom he had cast seven devils.”

The Christian church ceased to meet in the temple and met on the first day of the week (Sunday) early on in it’s existence in part due to the rejection by the Jews and their persecution, as well in honor of the resurrection. The Bible clearly states that Jesus rose on the first day of the week and Acts of the Apostles as well as Corinthians also shows that the NT church met on Sunday. SDA teaching notwithstanding…
Pax vobsicum,

[quote=mysterio100]i need some information to give to an adventis friend about why catholics go to church on sundays. she says that the bible states that the sabbath which is saturday should be kept.

If we go back to the Sabbath controversies in the Gospels it would not be difficult to realize that the question debated between Jesus and the Jewish leaders was not whether it was necessary to keep the Sabbath but how the Sabbath was to be observed.
A brief look at the Gospel of Luke, written to Gentile Christians, supports our main argument. The word “Sabbath” appears in Luke twenty-one times and eight additional times in Acts. Luke introduces (4:16) and closes Jesus ministry (23:54) with references to the Sabbath and then adds that the women rested on the Sabbath “according to the commandment” (23:56). Luke describes Jesus and his followers as habitual Sabbath keepers. If we examine the Sabbath controversies in the Gospel it would not be difficult to identify one of the key issues in the discussions. In 6:2 the Pharisees asked Jesus, “Why do you do what is not lawful on the Sabbath?” In the second incident recorded in 6:6-11, Jesus asked the Pharisees, “I ask you, is it lawful to do good or to do harm on the Sabbath?” In both cases the concern is proper Sabbath observance and not whether the Sabbath should be kept or not. The same applies to the Sabbath controversies that are unique to Luke. In 13:16 Jesus asked, “Should she not have been released from this bond on the Sabbath day?,” implying that it was lawful to heal her on the Sabbath. In the final case, recorded in 14:1-6, we find the more traditional question, “Is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath, or not?” It is obvious that with respect to the Sabbath the fundamental issue was defining proper Sabbath observance.
When Jesus says in Luke 6:5, “The Son of man is Lord of the Sabbath” Luke is saying that he has “the right to authoritatively represent the divine intention for the sabbath. . . . In this new situation the Son of Man is able to open up the full potential of the sabbath as God’s gift to humankind.” The Sabbath is for him a day of liberation from suffering and needs, a channel for loving actions. The references to the Sabbath in the gospels clearly show that the Christian communities were concerned about it. One could argue that perhaps the issue was whether one should or should not observe the Sabbath, or a conflict between the church and the synagogue, but the evidence clearly supports the conviction that the Gospels are instructing Jews and Gentile Christians on how to keep the Sabbath.
The New Testament contains irrefutable evidence to the effect that Jesus and his disciples observed the seventh day Sabbath. It is also clear that the Jewish Christian communities also kept the Sabbath during the apostolic period. Jesus, according to the Gospels, observed the Sabbath and made it a day in which he brought rest to the sick
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Sunday is the Christian Sabbath because Christ rose from the dead on Sunday. I believe that after the resurrection He never appeared except on the First Day of the Week, except at the Ascension. You can ignore Sunday if you are not Christian. There is tons of material in the Early Church writings on Sunday vs Sabbath.

I think it is important to mention also, that we are not bound by Mosaic Law, and our salvation is not dependent on our fulfilling the obligations of the Law given to the Jewish people in the Old Testament. We are not bound to the Sabbath, and that is clearly declared in the New Testament. We are, however, to “love the Lord God above all things” as Jesus commanded us in his summation of the whole of the Law, and part of loving God above all things is worshiping Him, on Sunday with the entirety of the Church he established, that entirety being the Church here on earth, the Church suffering in Purgatory, and the Church glorified in Heaven.

Exodus 16:23-24 is the first mention of the Sabbath. Interestingly, it has to do with the collection of manna. (In the New Covenent, what is that manna? Jesus, the Bread of Heaven!)

Then later, in Ex 20: 8-11 Sabbath Law was restated in the Ten Commandments. "8: "Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. 9: Six days you shall labor, and do all your work;
10: but the seventh day is a sabbath to the LORD your God; in it you shall not do any work, you, or your son, or your daughter, your manservant, or your maidservant, or your cattle, or the sojourner who is within your gates;
11: for in six days the LORD made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested the seventh day; therefore the LORD blessed the sabbath day and hallowed it. "

This passage does not specifically say the FIRST six days you shall labor just that six days you shall labor.

Christ honored the Sabbath because He was still bound by the Old Covenent. However, He instituted a New Covenent at the Last Supper which is what we Christians follow. He said He was Lord of the Sabbath (Mt12:8) and interestingly, He was resurrected on a Sunday, He appeared to the apostles on the following two Sundays and (surprise) the Holy Spirit descended to the apostles on a Sunday.

It is clear that Our Lord rebuked the strict interpretation of Sabbath law that the Jews of the day were observing. It was obvious that they (the Jews) had lost touch with its meaning. They were keeping the law to the letter but not the holiness. In my opinion, it is the same with insisting that the Sabbath has to be on a Saturday. Does God really care about the actual day that you worship Him or does He care more that you set aside a day for that purpose?

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