African Americans and Latinos Spur Gay Marriage revolution


#1

washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-fix/wp/2012/11/12/african-americans-and-latinos-play-big-role-in-gay-marriage-revolution/

Maryland is heavily Democratic, which made it a likely candidate to be one of the first states to vote for gay marriage. But the state is also heavily African-American (29 percent) and has a significant Latino population (8 percent), which made passage something less than certain.

On Tuesday in Maryland, though, 46 percent of African Americans supported gay marriage. And according to national exit polls, 52 percent of both black and Latino voters who turned out Tuesday said they support gay marriage in their states.
(The largest shift came from black women, of which 59 percent now support gay marriage, compared to 42 percent of black men — a huge gender gap.)…

The exit polls suggest both groups have now moved in large numbers toward supporting gay marriage. Their shifts may not be bigger than other demographics, but the fact that they are shifting at all (after sticking to their opposition) is what’s really significant here.

And given their affinity for President Obama — 93 percent of African Americans and 71 percent of Latinos voted for the president — it’s not unreasonable to think that his support had an impact.

This is the Washington Post (liberal press) reporting this and this does seem to be true.(they are saying it is the women’s vote):shrug:


#2

Also from the ‘article’; ‘article’ emphasized because it’s a blog.

That said, the other three states (besides Maryland) that voted in favor of gay marriage Tuesday are among the whitest states in the country, with Maine being the whitest and Minnesota being 83 percent white.

That’s not surprising, as support has also increased among many other demographics, including Republicans and older people.


#3

Before anyone jumps all over me on this, my question is - is it the women’s vote in the African-American and Latino population which the article says voted 59% in favor of gay marriage that is making it possible to put gay marriage in states. Maine and Washington are smaller states.

It also said this

But the fact is that the states that are the most Democratic — and thus the likeliest candidates to pass gay marriage laws — tend to be more diverse (California, New York, New Jersey, Illinois, etc.). And if African Americans and Latinos are as onboard with gay marriage as the exit polls suggest, the four states that voted in favor of gay marriage on Tuesday might be the first of many.


#4

My take on it, is that it is primarily a generational issue. The President attracts younger voters. This is why I say that this train will be pulling into the station, regardless of the opposition. As long as people get older, “progress” will happen.

So, I don’t think there is much point in singling out specific demographic groups for analysis. It is a general trend.


#5

originally** posted by epan**
My take on it, is that it is primarily a generational issue. The President attracts younger voters. This is why I say that this train will be pulling into the station, regardless of the opposition. As long as people get older, “progress” will happen.

So, I don’t think there is much point in singling out specific demographic groups for analysis. It is a general trend.

I am trying not to be defensive on this but this article is singling out spedific groups as it does for so many groups for analysis which helps us to look at issues.

You are saying it is the young but I think it may be the women’s vote?

Texas 's news seem more conservative than many states and we saw what happened in North Carolina. Smaller states such as Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Iowa have always struggled to prevent this because they are small state with very little money to fight and the money does pour it to pass gay marriage.

If in the next major ballot election another group on states(which makes it harder to fight at each state level) was put on the ballot, -say even Texas, would they pass gay marriage?


#6

Here are a few observations which might be relevant:

Exit polls aren’t very precise, so shouldn’t be taken too seriously.

Regular polls have consistently shown women, as a group, are significantly more supportive of same-sex marriage than men

The shifting attitudes in the black community regarding same-sex marriage has been in evidence for a couple years.

There is a profound regional difference in attitudes towards same sex marriage. People in the mid-Atlantic states and New England are the most supportive. People in the southern states are the least supportive.
people-press.org/2012/11/09/behind-gay-marriage-momentum-regional-gaps-persist/

An interesting analysis would compare the attitudes of African-American voters in the south versus attitudes of African-Americans in other parts of the US. I wonder how much influence regional culture has on these shifting attitudes? Maryland is normally considered in the mid-Atlantic region.


#7

i know it’s out of subject, but a good book to read is : Confessions of a mega church pastor by Allen Hunt. :slight_smile:


#8

originally posted by Dale_M
Exit polls aren't very precise, so shouldn't be taken too seriously.

I never took them too seriously until this elelction when Pres. Obama was predicted to win for many months by these polls and he did. So now I look at them closer.

There is a profound regional difference in attitudes towards same sex marriage. People in the mid-Atlantic states and New England are the most supportive. People in the southern states are the least supportive.

This in interesting as I never thought of it as regional and why is it regional as don't at least catholic Latinos vote their conscience? In California, it was the African-American vote which stop gay marriage. Why did they do that then and now seem to have changed course? Would the community not be upset that the California court has ruled their vote is not important and overruled it?

I know that this win of three states for gay marriage was a major victory and the gay lobby will press on until each state has gay marriage. I am sure we will see another three states with ballots in the next major election. As I said, it is much easier to fight one state at a time.

The youth vote was a factor I am sure but I was surprised by the African-American and Latino vote for it. This is a separate ballot measure so each person had to vote for it. They may have voted for President Obama but could have easily voted against gay marriage.


#9

The article singles out specific demographics, which is fine for politicians seeking plurality, and tailoring their spin for each particular group.

But the broader scope, in my view goes like this:

  1. Marriage is a civil right, which was established by the judiciary and legal machinations surrounding the abolition of slavery.
  2. Women once had proscribed rights in marriage in many respects, including property and the vote.
  3. Women’s rights were expanded to have equal rights. A significant aspect of this expansion was no fault divorce, changes in child custody, and marital duties by gender, etc…
  4. We have reached the point legally that there is no gender distinction in marriage. Literally, each party has equal rights and responsibilities.
  5. Because there are no gender distinctions in marriage, under the law, there can be no gender distinction in who may marry.

QED

And then there is the cultural phenomenon which is equating all love as equal.

Combine the legal impetus with the cultural one, and there is a predictable result. Gay marriage will be legal in the US within a decade or two, unless something unexpected happens in the interim.


#10

[quote="gam197, post:8, topic:310830"]
I never took them too seriously until this elelction when Pres. Obama was predicted to win for many months by these polls and he did. So now I look at them closer.

[/quote]

He wasn't predicted by Gallup or Ramussen to win for months before he did


#11

To talk about 3 small New England states and then Iowa and calling them small states is really an insult to Iowa or displays a lack of knowledge. Iowa was spoken about as being able to be a swing the election state.

Electoral Votes:
Maine 4
New Hampshire 4
Vermont 3


Iowa 6

Iowa has more or as many votes as these states:

Nevada, Utah, Nebraska, Kansas, Mississippi, Arkansas, West Virgina, New Mexico, Nebraska … let alone less than 5 electoral votes like Montana and Wyoming.

See the electoral map: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electoral_College_%28United_States%29

Iowa has same-sex marriage because of Rogue Judges, all or most of whom were thrown out of office as a result of.

Don’t recall the last time, New Hampshire sent a team to the Rose Bowl.


#12

More like New England/New York region is a liberal area of the nation, speaking of New York, it is curious that you totally left them off and they are what? The 2nd most populated state I believe.


#13

Gay marriage is not a civil right issue. Question over its legality comes down to where there is compelling enough interest for the government to subsidise gay marriage with tax breaks and benefits that hetrosexual married couples receive. Do you believe there is compelling interest to legalise gay marriage, and if so, what?

Gay marriage is not inevitable and that has been seen in the 31 or 32 states that have written in their constitution that marriage is been a woman and man.

Traditional marriage supporters initiated the ballots in Washington, Minnesota and Maryland and after gay marriage was legalised in the 3 states gay marriage advocates said their priority was making gay marriage legal through the courts, not through the ballot box, which eludes they do not have faith that gay marriage will be expanded greatly at the ballot box even after the wins in 3 liberal states where they had a much larger budget than traditional marriage groups

When abortion was legalised, I bet most people on the pro abortion fence said there was no going back, yet in 2013 they will say abortion’s legality is not safe, and public opinion has changed very much against aboriton since it was legalised. I would not be shocked if gay marriage goes the same way


#14

Black and Latino voters helped Prop 8 to pass in California, whereas in Maryland majority helped to pass gay marriage legislation. Black and Latino voters are not a monolithic group. More inner city Blacks voted for Prop 8 than republicans did


#15

Same-sex marriage was allowed in this state because of a unanimous Iowa Supreme Court ruling. But I wouldn’t describe the justices as “rogue,” simply because I disliked their ruling.

Since that decision, the state legislature has not passed any new restrictions on marriage nor has it scheduled a vote for a state constitutional amendment which would abolish same-sex marriage.

The attitudes of Iowa voters seem to have becoming more accepting of the decision. We have lived with allowing such marriages for a couple years now, and haven’t seen the sky fall (despite predictions of the doomsayers.)

Granted, a campaign to oust three of the Supreme Court justices who ruled in that controversial decision was successful in 2010. But a similar campaign in 2012 failed. The fear-mongering is longer no convincing. :shrug:


#16

[quote="_Abyssinia, post:13, topic:310830"]
Gay marriage is not a civil right issue.

[/quote]

Rant all you like. Legally, at the end of the day, it is. If you don't believe me, review the judicial record.

If your point is that there is a bifurcation between legal and religious opinions, then we agree. I am not arguing the point that religious views don't disagree with judicial views in a secular society. If you are trying to make that case, then good luck to you.


#17

I think the justification is the same as for any marriage: being in a long term relationship brings a stability which is beneficial in terms of finances, health, and society.


#18

You don’t think marriage is a civil right? That’s interesting. I suppose relegating it to the status of a privilege - like getting a driver license, makes it easier for me to support gay marriage. I mean, the Amish oppose driver licenses and Catholics do not. I wouldn’t want the religious beliefs of the Amish to dictate whether I am allowed to get a driver license or not, why should a gay person want the religious beliefs of Catholics to dictate whether they can get a marriage license or not?

The government has the same compelling interest to legalize gay marriage as it does to legalize any marriage between two adult persons. Gay couples have families that include sons and daughters and a commitment to one another just like most Americans. I don’t see how denying them the benefits given to other families does the nation any good.


#19

originally posted by BroomWagon
To talk about 3 small New England states and then Iowa and calling them small states is really an insult to Iowa or displays a lack of knowledge. Iowa was spoken about as being able to be a swing the election state.

Iowa has 3 million people so I apologize for considering it a real small state.

More like New England/New York region is a liberal area of the nation, speaking of New York, it is curious that you totally left them off and they are what? The 2nd most populated state I believe

Massachusetts has a very strong male gay population which has been around for a long time co-existing in P-town and a female gay population in Northhampston and it does affect the smaller states. New York was mentioned as you can see by my prior post.

But the fact is that the states that are the most Democratic — and thus the likeliest candidates to pass gay marriage laws — tend to be more diverse (California, New York, New Jersey, Illinois, etc.). And if African Americans and Latinos are as onboard with gay marriage as the exit polls suggest, the four states that voted in favor of gay marriage on Tuesday might be the first of many

To say this is only about New England is wrong. When the vote came up the first time in Maine, it failed because it is easier to fight one state at a time. So much money pours in from all across the US to these states, it is unbelieveable.

New York did not get gay marriage until last year and again according to the article it is because of its diversity.


#20

And of course, you fail to mention that same sex couples as a rule don’t contribute new citizens to society.


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