Age for the priesthood


#1

i have a few questions first is mid 40s too old to be accepted into a seminary for the priesthood what if any academic qualifications are needed
does having debts discourage being accepted


#2

You should probably ask your vocations director. Contact your diocese. Some religious orders have different requirements so if you are called to one of them you should ask directly.


#3

there are some orders and seminaries that "specialize" in "late vocations". Begin with the vocations director of your diocese.


#4

I would reiterate what everyone else is saying: contact your diocesan vocations director.

I know the average age of those ordained seems to keep increasing, so don't count yourself out just yet.

If you don't have the requisite education yet, they will get you there. :)

Debt can be an issue, but, again, you'd need to discuss it with the vocations director.

God bless you in your discernment!


#5

[quote="pete5555, post:1, topic:205448"]
i have a few questions first is mid 40s too old to be accepted into a seminary for the priesthood what if any academic qualifications are needed
does having debts discourage being accepted

[/quote]

Well, 40's is absolutely not a problem. I've heard of men in their 60's going to seminary. I heard of one man in his 70's that was ordained, although I suspect that was an exception to the rule.

With regard to debt, that could be a problem (small credit card type balances notwithstanding). If you're up to your neck in debt, then you need to deal with that first. Don't want to be distracted in seminary, you know? :)

You want to be very careful which diocese you sign up with, though. Some are really bad. I've heard horror stories from priests. Fr. John Corapi tried in his home diocese, and the guy in charge of vocations talked to him for about three hours about how the bishop would never ordain a man who wasn't in favor of women's ordination, acceptance of homosexual acts, and a bunch of other stuff that's against Church teaching. He went to another diocese and got in. While there, someone found a letter in his file from the guy in his home diocese. It said some horrible things about him that were absolutely untrue, said he was unfit for the priesthood, etc. So, he asked the assistant dean (or whatever his title was) about it. The asst. dean said, "Oh, yeah! That letter was the talk of the town! We were sitting down to select the next year's class and yours came up. Someone said, "Ut oh! We have a problem letter here." So, the head guy asked him to read it aloud, which he did. There was dead silence. Then, the head guy asked, "What diocese was that from again?" And the guy that read it told him. The head guy picked up his gavel, slammed it down and said, "Accepted! Our kind of man!" LOL


#6

[quote="Scoobyshme, post:5, topic:205448"]

You want to be very careful which diocese you sign up with, though. Some are really bad. I've heard horror stories from priests. Fr. John Corapi tried in his home diocese, and the guy in charge of vocations talked to him for about three hours about how the bishop would never ordain a man who wasn't in favor of women's ordination, acceptance of homosexual acts, and a bunch of other stuff that's against Church teaching. He went to another diocese and got in. While there, someone found a letter in his file from the guy in his home diocese. It said some horrible things about him that were absolutely untrue, said he was unfit for the priesthood, etc. So, he asked the assistant dean (or whatever his title was) about it. The asst. dean said, "Oh, yeah! That letter was the talk of the town! We were sitting down to select the next year's class and yours came up. Someone said, "Ut oh! We have a problem letter here." So, the head guy asked him to read it aloud, which he did. There was dead silence. Then, the head guy asked, "What diocese was that from again?" And the guy that read it told him. The head guy picked up his gavel, slammed it down and said, "Accepted! Our kind of man!" LOL

[/quote]

That story is rather fascinating. However, was Fr. Corapi talking about himself or another priest? From far as I know, Fr. Corapi belongs to S.O.L.T. rather than a diocese.


#7

I know that it is a trite saying, but with God, basically anything is possible. If He wants to be a priest, you will almost certainly be ordained one if you pursue that path.


#8

[quote="Young_Thinker, post:6, topic:205448"]
That story is rather fascinating. However, was Fr. Corapi talking about himself or another priest? From far as I know, Fr. Corapi belongs to S.O.L.T. rather than a diocese.

[/quote]

i may be wrong, but i believe Fr, Corapi was first a diocesan priest, and then joined S.O.T.L


#9

[quote="Scoobyshme, post:5, topic:205448"]
Well, 40's is absolutely not a problem. I've heard of men in their 60's going to seminary. I heard of one man in his 70's that was ordained, although I suspect that was an exception to the rule.

With regard to debt, that could be a problem (small credit card type balances notwithstanding). If you're up to your neck in debt, then you need to deal with that first. Don't want to be distracted in seminary, you know? :)

You want to be very careful which diocese you sign up with, though. Some are really bad. I've heard horror stories from priests. Fr. John Corapi tried in his home diocese, and the guy in charge of vocations talked to him for about three hours about how the bishop would never ordain a man who wasn't in favor of women's ordination, acceptance of homosexual acts, and a bunch of other stuff that's against Church teaching. He went to another diocese and got in. While there, someone found a letter in his file from the guy in his home diocese. It said some horrible things about him that were absolutely untrue, said he was unfit for the priesthood, etc. So, he asked the assistant dean (or whatever his title was) about it. The asst. dean said, "Oh, yeah! That letter was the talk of the town! We were sitting down to select the next year's class and yours came up. Someone said, "Ut oh! We have a problem letter here." So, the head guy asked him to read it aloud, which he did. There was dead silence. Then, the head guy asked, "What diocese was that from again?" And the guy that read it told him. The head guy picked up his gavel, slammed it down and said, "Accepted! Our kind of man!" LOL

[/quote]

That is good sheit!


#10

[quote="Montalo, post:8, topic:205448"]
i may be wrong, but i believe Fr, Corapi was first a diocesan priest, and then joined S.O.T.L

[/quote]

That is interesting.


#11

[quote="pete5555, post:1, topic:205448"]
i have a few questions first is mid 40s too old to be accepted into a seminary for the priesthood what if any academic qualifications are needed
does having debts discourage being accepted

[/quote]

Age depends on the diocese or order Archdiocese of Philadelphia has a strict age limit (40, IIRC), the Diocese of Trenton across the river does not, nor did Scranton.

High school diploma is generally necessary, some college or bachelor's preferred (particularly entering older). If you do not have a bachelors it may take 8+ years in school; 6 years with bachelor's.

Debts, except minor ones are an issue in most places, but there are resources for those entering a seminary or religious order to help them with the debts.

Obviously there is a good amount that depends on the exact situation, and to answer those questions you would have to ask a vocations director.


#12

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