All Sins are Equal?


#1

I've always been told that all sins are equal in the eyes of Jesus. There is no sin that is greater than others, a sin is a sin. I've been reading a few of other threads where people were categorizing types of sins saying that some were worse than others? Quite frankly, I'm a little confused. Could someone help clear this up for me?


#2

NO. All sins are not equal in God’s eyes.


#3

[quote="Baseballguy, post:1, topic:325392"]
I've always been told that all sins are equal in the eyes of Jesus. There is no sin that is greater than others, a sin is a sin. I've been reading a few of other threads where people were categorizing types of sins saying that some were worse than others? Quite frankly, I'm a little confused. Could someone help clear this up for me?

[/quote]

16 If anyone sees his brother sinning, if the sin is not deadly, he should pray to God and he will give him life. This is only for those whose sin is not deadly. There is such a thing as deadly sin, about which I do not say that you should pray.17 All wrongdoing is sin, but there is sin that is not deadly.
1 John 5:16-17

No. The Church teaches that there are gravities of sin. Not all sin is equal.


#4

[quote="billcu1, post:2, topic:325392"]
NO. All sins are not equal in God's eyes.

[/quote]

Could you tell me the order of which the sins are officially ranked? o_O If there is an "official" ranking of sins.


#5

[quote="teachccd, post:3, topic:325392"]
16 If anyone sees his brother sinning, if the sin is not deadly, he should pray to God and he will give him life. This is only for those whose sin is not deadly. There is such a thing as deadly sin, about which I do not say that you should pray.17 All wrongdoing is sin, but there is sin that is not deadly.
1 John 5:16-17

No. The Church teaches that there are gravities of sin. Not all sin is equal.

[/quote]

THANK YOU SOOOO MUCH FOR THIS! What exactly are all the "gravities of sin"?


#6

Hey here is our CCC in loooong form :smiley: God Bless

II. THE DEFINITION OF SIN

1849 Sin is an offense against reason, truth, and right conscience; it is failure in genuine love for God and neighbor caused by a perverse attachment to certain goods. It wounds the nature of man and injures human solidarity. It has been defined as "an utterance, a deed, or a desire contrary to the eternal law."121

1850 Sin is an offense against God: "Against you, you alone, have I sinned, and done that which is evil in your sight."122 Sin sets itself against God’s love for us and turns our hearts away from it. Like the first sin, it is disobedience, a revolt against God through the will to become "like gods,"123 knowing and determining good and evil. Sin is thus "love of oneself even to contempt of God."124 In this proud self- exaltation, sin is diametrically opposed to the obedience of Jesus, which achieves our salvation.125

IV. THE GRAVITY OF SIN: MORTAL AND VENIAL SIN

**1854 **Sins are rightly evaluated according to their gravity. The distinction between mortal and venial sin, already evident in Scripture,129 became part of the tradition of the Church. It is corroborated by human experience.

**1855 **Mortal sin destroys charity in the heart of man by a grave violation of God’s law; it turns man away from God, who is his ultimate end and his beatitude, by preferring an inferior good to him.

Venial sin allows charity to subsist, even though it offends and wounds it.

1856 Mortal sin, by attacking the vital principle within us - that is, charity - necessitates a new initiative of God’s mercy and a conversion of heart which is normally accomplished within the setting of the sacrament of reconciliation:

When the will sets itself upon something that is of its nature incompatible with the charity that orients man toward his ultimate end, then the sin is mortal by its very object . . . whether it contradicts the love of God, such as blasphemy or perjury, or the love of neighbor, such as homicide or adultery. . . . But when the sinner’s will is set upon something that of its nature involves a disorder, but is not opposed to the love of God and neighbor, such as thoughtless chatter or immoderate laughter and the like, such sins are venial.130
1857 For a sin to be mortal, three conditions must together be met: "Mortal sin is sin whose object is grave matter and which is also committed with full knowledge and deliberate consent."131

1858 Grave matter is specified by the Ten Commandments, corresponding to the answer of Jesus to the rich young man: "Do not kill, Do not commit adultery, Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Do not defraud, Honor your father and your mother."132 The gravity of sins is more or less great: murder is graver than theft. One must also take into account who is wronged: violence against parents is in itself graver than violence against a stranger.

1859 Mortal sin requires full knowledge and complete consent. It presupposes knowledge of the sinful character of the act, of its opposition to God’s law. It also implies a consent sufficiently deliberate to be a personal choice. Feigned ignorance and hardness of heart133 do not diminish, but rather increase, the voluntary character of a sin.

1860 Unintentional ignorance can diminish or even remove the imputability of a grave offense. But no one is deemed to be ignorant of the principles of the moral law, which are written in the conscience of every man. The promptings of feelings and passions can also diminish the voluntary and free character of the offense, as can external pressures or pathological disorders. Sin committed through malice, by deliberate choice of evil, is the gravest.

1861 Mortal sin is a radical possibility of human freedom, as is love itself. It results in the loss of charity and the privation of sanctifying grace, that is, of the state of grace. If it is not redeemed by repentance and God’s forgiveness, it causes exclusion from Christ’s kingdom and the eternal death of hell, for our freedom has the power to make choices for ever, with no turning back. However, although we can judge that an act is in itself a grave offense, we must entrust judgment of persons to the justice and mercy of God.

**1862 **One commits venial sin when, in a less serious matter, he does not observe the standard prescribed by the moral law, or when he disobeys the moral law in a grave matter, but without full knowledge or without complete consent.

1863 Venial sin weakens charity; it manifests a disordered affection for created goods; it impedes the soul’s progress in the exercise of the virtues and the practice of the moral good; it merits temporal punishment. Deliberate and unrepented venial sin disposes us little by little to commit mortal sin. However venial sin does not break the covenant with God. With God’s grace it is humanly reparable. "Venial sin does not deprive the sinner of sanctifying grace, friendship with God, charity, and consequently eternal happiness."134

While he is in the flesh, man cannot help but have at least some light sins. But do not despise these sins which we call “light”: if you take them for light when you weigh them, tremble when you count them. A number of light objects makes a great mass; a number of drops fills a river; a number of grains makes a heap. What then is our hope? Above all, confession.135
1864 "Therefore I tell you, every sin and blasphemy will be forgiven men, but the blasphemy against the Spirit will not be forgiven."136 There are no limits to the mercy of God, but anyone who deliberately refuses to accept his mercy by repenting, rejects the forgiveness of his sins and the salvation offered by the Holy Spirit.137 Such hardness of heart can lead to final impenitence and eternal loss.


#7

[quote="Mystical777, post:6, topic:325392"]
Hey here is our CCC in loooong form :D God Bless

II. THE DEFINITION OF SIN

1849 Sin is an offense against reason, truth, and right conscience; it is failure in genuine love for God and neighbor caused by a perverse attachment to certain goods. It wounds the nature of man and injures human solidarity. It has been defined as "an utterance, a deed, or a desire contrary to the eternal law."121

1850 Sin is an offense against God: "Against you, you alone, have I sinned, and done that which is evil in your sight."122 Sin sets itself against God's love for us and turns our hearts away from it. Like the first sin, it is disobedience, a revolt against God through the will to become "like gods,"123 knowing and determining good and evil. Sin is thus "love of oneself even to contempt of God."124 In this proud self- exaltation, sin is diametrically opposed to the obedience of Jesus, which achieves our salvation.125

IV. THE GRAVITY OF SIN: MORTAL AND VENIAL SIN

**1854 **Sins are rightly evaluated according to their gravity. The distinction between mortal and venial sin, already evident in Scripture,129 became part of the tradition of the Church. It is corroborated by human experience.

**1855 **Mortal sin destroys charity in the heart of man by a grave violation of God's law; it turns man away from God, who is his ultimate end and his beatitude, by preferring an inferior good to him.

Venial sin allows charity to subsist, even though it offends and wounds it.

1856 Mortal sin, by attacking the vital principle within us - that is, charity - necessitates a new initiative of God's mercy and a conversion of heart which is normally accomplished within the setting of the sacrament of reconciliation:

When the will sets itself upon something that is of its nature incompatible with the charity that orients man toward his ultimate end, then the sin is mortal by its very object . . . whether it contradicts the love of God, such as blasphemy or perjury, or the love of neighbor, such as homicide or adultery. . . . But when the sinner's will is set upon something that of its nature involves a disorder, but is not opposed to the love of God and neighbor, such as thoughtless chatter or immoderate laughter and the like, such sins are venial.130
1857 For a sin to be mortal, three conditions must together be met: "Mortal sin is sin whose object is grave matter and which is also committed with full knowledge and deliberate consent."131

1858 Grave matter is specified by the Ten Commandments, corresponding to the answer of Jesus to the rich young man: "Do not kill, Do not commit adultery, Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Do not defraud, Honor your father and your mother."132 The gravity of sins is more or less great: murder is graver than theft. One must also take into account who is wronged: violence against parents is in itself graver than violence against a stranger.

1859 Mortal sin requires full knowledge and complete consent. It presupposes knowledge of the sinful character of the act, of its opposition to God's law. It also implies a consent sufficiently deliberate to be a personal choice. Feigned ignorance and hardness of heart133 do not diminish, but rather increase, the voluntary character of a sin.

1860 Unintentional ignorance can diminish or even remove the imputability of a grave offense. But no one is deemed to be ignorant of the principles of the moral law, which are written in the conscience of every man. The promptings of feelings and passions can also diminish the voluntary and free character of the offense, as can external pressures or pathological disorders. Sin committed through malice, by deliberate choice of evil, is the gravest.

1861 Mortal sin is a radical possibility of human freedom, as is love itself. It results in the loss of charity and the privation of sanctifying grace, that is, of the state of grace. If it is not redeemed by repentance and God's forgiveness, it causes exclusion from Christ's kingdom and the eternal death of hell, for our freedom has the power to make choices for ever, with no turning back. However, although we can judge that an act is in itself a grave offense, we must entrust judgment of persons to the justice and mercy of God.

**1862 **One commits venial sin when, in a less serious matter, he does not observe the standard prescribed by the moral law, or when he disobeys the moral law in a grave matter, but without full knowledge or without complete consent.

1863 Venial sin weakens charity; it manifests a disordered affection for created goods; it impedes the soul's progress in the exercise of the virtues and the practice of the moral good; it merits temporal punishment. Deliberate and unrepented venial sin disposes us little by little to commit mortal sin. However venial sin does not break the covenant with God. With God's grace it is humanly reparable. "Venial sin does not deprive the sinner of sanctifying grace, friendship with God, charity, and consequently eternal happiness."134

While he is in the flesh, man cannot help but have at least some light sins. But do not despise these sins which we call "light": if you take them for light when you weigh them, tremble when you count them. A number of light objects makes a great mass; a number of drops fills a river; a number of grains makes a heap. What then is our hope? Above all, confession.135
1864 "Therefore I tell you, every sin and blasphemy will be forgiven men, but the blasphemy against the Spirit will not be forgiven."136 There are no limits to the mercy of God, but anyone who deliberately refuses to accept his mercy by repenting, rejects the forgiveness of his sins and the salvation offered by the Holy Spirit.137 Such hardness of heart can lead to final impenitence and eternal loss.

[/quote]

This is what I was going to post next. Thank you!!! :)


#8

[quote="Baseballguy, post:1, topic:325392"]
I've always been told that all sins are equal in the eyes of Jesus. There is no sin that is greater than others, a sin is a sin. I've been reading a few of other threads where people were categorizing types of sins saying that some were worse than others? Quite frankly, I'm a little confused. Could someone help clear this up for me?

[/quote]

It may be the case for many denominations of Protestantism that all, or most, sins are equal in gravity, but it is not true for Catholicism or Judaism.


#9

I ask my 10 year old son if he finished his homework and despite the fact that he has three more math problems, he lies and says yes because he wants to go outside and play.. VS. Nazi SS who terrorizes starving Jews before eventually shooting them.

How could any reasonable person suggest these sins are equal?


#10

That’s an extreme example but if the end result is hell, what difference does it make which sin you commited?

I have a hard time understaning this. Here on earth, some sins are obviously worse than others. Murder is worse than masturbation since one has a direct effect on the world and the other is more indirect or has no effect on others. But both are mortal sins and can result in seperation from God. I don’t buy that there are levels of hell or whatever.


#11

Why do you have a problem with the degrees of punishment in hell? It only makes sense that as one has a degree of reward and enjoyment in heaven based on his merits in Christ on earth and rooted in the degree of his love for God, so also one’s punishment corresponds to the degree of his offenses. Granted going to hell is still hell but there has to be varying degrees of punishment so that one who rapes and murders many people throughout his whole entire life would not receive the same degree of punishment as one who only commits one willful moral sin of lust. This is also what the Church teaches, so I’m interested to hear if you have a particular reason behind why you might find this difficult as I’d be happy to provide any sources to assist in further explanation as to the reasons we believe this.


#12

[quote="una_fides, post:11, topic:325392"]
I'd be happy to provide any sources to assist in further explanation as to the reasons we believe this.

[/quote]

Hey, I'd love to hear more about this if you could provide me some sources or some scriptures in the bible with more information about this! Thanks!! God Bless!


#13

Check these out;

1

John 19:11
Jesus answered: Thou shouldst not have any power against me, unless it were given thee from above. Therefore, he that hath delivered me to thee, hath the greater sin.

2

Lamentations 4:6
And the iniquity of the daughter of my people is made greater than the sin of Sodom, which was overthrown in a moment, and hands took nothing in her


#14

The Catholic Church does not teach levels of hell! There is more on this topic in the CCC.
IV. HELL

1033 We cannot be united with God unless we freely choose to love him. But we cannot love God if we sin gravely against him, against our neighbor or against ourselves: "He who does not love remains in death. Anyone who hates his brother is a murderer, and you know that no murderer has eternal life abiding in him."612 Our Lord warns us that we shall be separated from him if we fail to meet the serious needs of the poor and the little ones who are his brethren.613 To die in mortal sin without repenting and accepting God's merciful love means remaining separated from him for ever by our own free choice. This state of definitive self-exclusion from communion with God and the blessed is called "hell."


#15

[quote="Baseballguy, post:1, topic:325392"]
I've always been told that all sins are equal in the eyes of Jesus. There is no sin that is greater than others, a sin is a sin. I've been reading a few of other threads where people were categorizing types of sins saying that some were worse than others? Quite frankly, I'm a little confused. Could someone help clear this up for me?

[/quote]

Well there is such thing as a "mortal sin". This sin is a lot more severe than the lesser "venial sins". A mortal sin leads to separation from God.

There are three things that constitute a mortal sin.
1. The sin is of grave matter
2. You have full knowledge of the sin
3. You have full consent towards the sin


#16

[quote="YosefYosep, post:15, topic:325392"]
Well there is such thing as a "mortal sin". This sin is a lot more severe than the lesser "venial sins". A mortal sin leads to separation from God.

There are three things that constitute a mortal sin.
1. The sin is of grave matter
2. You have full knowledge of the sin
3. You have full consent towards the sin

[/quote]

What do you mean by "grave matter" exactly?


#17

1858 Grave matter is specified by the Ten Commandments, corresponding to the answer of Jesus to the rich young man: "Do not kill, Do not commit adultery, Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Do not defraud, Honor your father and your mother."132 The gravity of sins is more or less great: murder is graver than theft. One must also take into account who is wronged: violence against parents is in itself graver than violence against a stranger.

Grave matter usually consists of sinister and serious intent. Something that is just immorally distorted. A common example is something like masturbation is a grave matter, it is a misuse of our life-giving gift. It takes the natural potential of life out of the sexual act. The gravity of masturbation can be lessened if it is habitual or if the person has no knowledge of it being sinful in the first place.


#18

[quote="YosefYosep, post:17, topic:325392"]
1858 Grave matter is specified by the Ten Commandments, corresponding to the answer of Jesus to the rich young man: "Do not kill, Do not commit adultery, Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Do not defraud, Honor your father and your mother."132 The gravity of sins is more or less great: murder is graver than theft. One must also take into account who is wronged: violence against parents is in itself graver than violence against a stranger.

Grave matter usually consists of sinister and serious intent. Something that is just immorally distorted. A common example is something like masturbation is a grave matter, it is a misuse of our life-giving gift. It takes the natural potential of life out of the sexual act. The gravity of masturbation can be lessened if it is habitual or if the person has no knowledge of it being sinful in the first place.

[/quote]

Thank you very much for clearing that up for me!


#19

No problem! God bless!


#20

[quote="Baseballguy, post:1, topic:325392"]
I've always been told that all sins are equal in the eyes of Jesus. There is no sin that is greater than others, a sin is a sin. I've been reading a few of other threads where people were categorizing types of sins saying that some were worse than others? Quite frankly, I'm a little confused. Could someone help clear this up for me?

[/quote]

In my opinion, those who infer that all sin is the same, often will have "an axe to grind" or have underlying issues with Church teaching. Many times they'll try to justify their support of behavior that contradicts teachings with regards to co-habitation, abortion, homosexuality & other current moral issues. "Sin is sin" sounds noble but the underlying message often has diabolic origins. Reading the Bible & Catechism will clear up this concept.


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