All the Different Forms of the Mass


#1

Hi,

In the Roman Catholic Church, how many licit forms of the Mass are there? Just the EF and NO? Looking at it officially, is the Extraordinary Form the one that's been used right back to the time of Saint Peter? Obviously there'll be differences but did the Church ever actually institute the EF? If it did, what did they use before that? How many different Roman Catholic Masses have there been throughout history? Are any other than NO and EF actually valid (never mind licit)?

Sorry to hit you with so many questions, but I'm also wondering the grand total of licit Masses in the entire Catholic Church? I have no idea how many different ones the Eastern Churches use or have used... :confused:

Thanks so much!! :blessyou:
ClemtheCatholic


#2

Two other rites I can think of (in the Roman Church) that may still be used licitly (albeit on not widely) are the Mozarabic rite (around Toledo, Spain) and the Ambrosian (Milan, Italy).

I think those are quite properly rites with their own Mass, whereas the OF and EF are different forms of the same rite.


#3

The Extraordinary Form of Mass - the 'traditional' Latin Mass - dates back to the Council of Trent (around the year 1570). It is commonly called the 'Tridentine' Mass where the name relates to the name of the city of Tridentum which is modern-day 'Trent' (the anglicised form of Trento) in Italy.

The rite itself was formally codified at that time, but was an evolution (a slow one!) of the rite of Mass dating back throughout the ages.

There are other version of the Mass which are very occasionally used, such as the "Sarum Use" or "Sarum Rite" or "Use of Salisbury" which dates from around the 11th Century, as well as the 'Use of York', 'Use of Hereford', etc, which predate Henry VIII in England and were variants of the Roman Rite in use at the time.

Other than the rites already mentioned, I believe there is, or at least was, also a distinctive rite in use specifically by the Carthusian order of monks. Whether that is the case now or whether they celebrate Mass in the 'Novus Ordo' rite, I don't know.


#4

The Dominicans have their own Rite as well.


#5

From ewtn.com/expert/answers/catholic_rites_and_churches.htm:

• Roman – The overwhelming majority of Latin Catholics and of Catholics in general.
- Ordinary Formof the Roman Rite. *Mass celebrated in accordance with the *Missale Romanum of 1970, promulgated by Pope Paul VI, currently in its third edition (2002). The vernacular editions of this Missal, as well as the rites of the other sacraments, are translated from the Latin typical editions revised after the Second Vatican Council.
Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite. *Mass celebrated in accordance with the *Missale Romanum of 1962, promulgated by Blessed Pope John XXIII. The other sacraments are celebrated according to the Roman Ritual in force at the time of the Second Vatican Council. The Extraordinary Form is most notable for being almost entirely in Latin. In addition to institutes which have the faculty to celebrate the Extraordinary Form routinely, such as the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter and the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest, any Latin Rite priest may now offer the Mass and other sacraments in accordance with norms of Summorum Pontificum.
Anglican Use. Since the 1980s the Holy See has granted some former Anglican and Episcopal clergy converting with their parishes the faculty of celebrating the sacramental rites according to Anglican forms, doctrinally corrected.
**
• Mozarabic – The Rite of the Iberian peninsula (Spain and Portugal) known from at least the 6th century, but probably with roots to the original evangelization. Beginning in the 11th century it was generally replaced by the Roman Rite, although it has remained the Rite of the Cathedral of the Archdiocese of Toledo, Spain, and six parishes which sought permission to adhere to it. Its celebration today is generally semi–private.
**
• Ambrosian
– The Rite of the Archdiocese of Milan, Italy, thought to be of early origin and probably consolidated, but not originated, by St. Ambrose. Pope Paul VI was from this Roman Rite. It continues to be celebrated in Milan, though not by all parishes.
**
• Bragan** – Rite of the Archdiocese of Braga, the Primatial See of Portugal, it derives from the 12th century or earlier. It continues to be of occasional use.
**
• Dominican** – Rite of the Order of Friars Preacher (OP), founded by St. Dominic in 1215.
**
• Carmelite** – Rite of the Order of Carmel, whose modern foundation was by St. Berthold c.1154.
**
• Carthusian** – Rite of the Carthusian Order founded by St. Bruno in 1084.

This list is just for the Western Rite. There are more forms in the Eastern Rite.


#6

forums.catholic.com/showpost.php?p=9320538&postcount=31


#7

[quote="TheDoctor, post:5, topic:310939"]
This list is just for the Western Rite.

[/quote]

For some reason the Zairean/Congolese is always left out.


#8

Incorrect, or at least slighly misleading. Prior to the council of Trent there was no established universal rite for the Roman church… in fact, that’s what establishing the Tridentine Rite was for in the first place: to eliminate the various practices going on around the world.

While it inherited many elements of the mass that had developed over time, it did not do so from any single authoritative source rite… rather drawing from several of the largest and most reverent rites. What was definitely preserved were the core aspects of the mass which had been handed down from the first established masses (and drew their historical practices from evolutions of Jewish worship/passover).


#9

There are truly tons of Rites and Uses and Forms of Mass in the Latin Church. It is really quite beautiful, and I find this often surprises many people.


#10

Wow. I'd like to experience all of them! =)


#11

[quote="ClemtheCatholic, post:1, topic:310939"]
Hi,

In the Roman Catholic Church, how many licit forms of the Mass are there? Just the EF and NO? Looking at it officially, is the Extraordinary Form the one that's been used right back to the time of Saint Peter? Obviously there'll be differences but did the Church ever actually institute the EF? If it did, what did they use before that? How many different Roman Catholic Masses have there been throughout history? Are any other than NO and EF actually valid (never mind licit)?

Sorry to hit you with so many questions, but I'm also wondering the grand total of licit Masses in the entire Catholic Church? I have no idea how many different ones the Eastern Churches use or have used... :confused:

Thanks so much!! :blessyou:
ClemtheCatholic

[/quote]

For the Latin Church there was much variety before Trent standardized.

A.D.

1470-1570: 14 printed editions with variations Milan, Venice, Paris and Lyon
1481-1738: 16 printed editions Parisian Missal

The Latin language Missale Romanum editio typica, since the Council of Trent:
1570 Pope Pius V
1604 Pope Clement VII
1634 Pope Urban VII
1884 Pope Leo XIII
1920 Pope Benedict XV
1962 Pope John XXIII
Missale Romanum, Ordinary Form, Latin language:
1969 Pope Paul VI (typical edition)
1975 Pope Paul VI (second typical edition)
2002 Pope John Paul II (third typical edition)
2008 Pope Benedict XVI (third typical edition emended)

Rome published these recensions for the Eastern Catholic Churches:

I.-Liturgical Books For The Eastern Churches of the Byzantine Rite
V51 In Greek Language
V52 1. General Recension (For Russian, Bulgarian, Serbs)
V53 2. Ruthenian Recension (For Ukrainian and Ruthenian)
V53 3. For both [Slavic] Recensions
V54 In Romanian Language

V55 II. Liturgical Books For The Eastern Churches of Alexandrian-Coptic Rite
V56 III. Liturgical Books For The Eastern Churches of Alexandria-Ethiopian Rite
V57 IV. Edition of the Roman Ritual Of Ethiopia
V58 V. Liturgical Books For The Eastern Churches of Syro-Chaldean Oriental RIte
V59 Variations
V60 VI. Liturgical Books For The Eastern Churches In Russian Language
V61 VII. Liturgical Books For The Eastern Churches Of Melkite Rite

vatican.va/roman_curia/institutions_connected/lev/documents/varie.html

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#12

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