American Girl Dolls - do they promote the right message


#1

I am looking for advise on the dolls and web site activities. My 7 and 9 year olds both want the american dolls for christmas and I need to know if they are appropiate and promote good values for my daughterrs before i spend 200 dollars or the dolls - all and any reviews are appreciated.:slight_smile:


#2

I don't have kids; I am a guy; I don't know what dolls you are specifically talking about and I don't play with dolls. But here's my short opinion.

No. They mostly teach young girls that immodesty is cool. That it's all about 'accessorizing' and having flashy things. That everything is orientated towards the opposite sex. That being spoilt is 'fun' and 'exciting' and being a brat is the best thing to be.


#3

Please don't pay any attention to NewsTheMan. He would probably be offended by dolls dressed in Burkas.

I would not buy my daughter some dolls, like Bratz. American Girl dolls are fine.


#4

How kind and charitable of you :slight_smile:


#5

Jesus,our Lords peace be whit You.
I am a father,divorced one,and I have two own kids,a boy and a girl and a step-daughter,all grown up now,so I may know something,I say may,because You did not said what kind of dolls,Barbies? Based on very little facts from You I would say that no toy will harm a kid as long as the child is living in a loving family who both give and get love from each other. As a child I had toy-guns,and I ended up a pacifist,but can say that it wos fun to play around whit them,I wos also teached what a REAL gun is,and what harm it can make. I live in Finland so maybe You don't understand that gun-point (well,that wos a choise of words) but here a gun is not a usual thing to have at home. But back to Your question. We all know how Barbie looks like,and I have never seen a real girl like Barbie,and I think also that let children be children. Give them love,throw a way all books about parenthood,teach them rigth from wrong,take them whit You to Church,and don't be surprised if they when the teen-age begin,don't always wont to go,let them stay home,God takes care of them,and they will return to Church if they want. We can't force anyone to be a "good" churc-going catholic,as long as You at home show them what it is to be a good catholic,and above all,use common sence,to be a mom or dad is not rocket-science,it is a lot of sleepless nights,nervous breakdowns,thoughts about jump under the first bus comming,counting to ten before You say something You don't want to,many prayers,and all is this before they reach teen age. But shortly,enjoy them,and let them enjoy them self whitin the law and thank God for every sleepless night,nervous breakdown and deathwish seeing a bus,they are Gods wonderfull gift to us,so treat them like that,Luis Pasteur once said "respect children for what they are and for what they one day may be". So don't worry.


#6

I personally don't think there is anything wrong with the American Girl dolls. In fact, I have two of them waiting for my daughter for when she grows up a little bit more (Addy and Kirsten). If you are truly concerned, read the books of the doll that they want and make your decision from there (instead of relying on stranger's opinions). Only you know what you want your kids to be exposed to. All six of them would only take an adult an hour; hour and 15 minutes tops.

I have some good memories with the books and dolls :)


#7

[quote="NewsTheMan, post:2, topic:217226"]

No. They mostly teach young girls that immodesty is cool.

[/quote]

http://images.fanpop.com/images/image_uploads/Samantha-american-girl-dolls-161883_400_400.jpg

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_abdsGKCsvWg/SuqGA9kkmBI/AAAAAAAABAg/goGtNXLMzm4/s320/Molly.jpg

This second one is totally immodest - you can see her bare calves :eek: And surely Satan is salivating over their color coordinated ribbons.

:rolleyes:

What should young girls play with, NewsTheMan?


#8

Oh come on people. I said - I don't know what dolls are being spoken about. So I gave a general opinion.

http://www.babble.com/CS/photos/apr2007/images/14426/350x240.aspx
https://ssl103.webhosting.optonline.net/simplyus.us/merchantmanager/images/uploads/barbie-topmodel.JPG
http://gingermiss.files.wordpress.com/2007/07/bratz.jpg

That's what I am talking about.


#9

I'm sorry I was snarky, NewsTheMan - but not all dolls are created equal, and the OP wasn't asking if dolls in general promoted the right message. There's no reason to lump them all together when there are so many different types.

I agree with you about Bratz and the like. That first picture is postively pornographic.


#10

[quote="NoxSineStellae, post:9, topic:217226"]
I'm sorry I was snarky, NewsTheMan - but not all dolls are created equal, and the OP wasn't asking if dolls in general promoted the right message. There's no reason to lump them all together when there are so many different types.

I agree with you about Bratz and the like. That first picture is postively pornographic.

[/quote]

Oh yes, I see that now.

I am not American - I didn't know "American Dolls" was a specific brandname/type of doll.

My apologies to the OP then, and to you.:o


#11

cbsnews.com/stories/2005/12/21/eveningnews/main1156552.shtml

"...the American Girl company donates money to an organization called Girls Incorporated, which offers support to underprivileged girls. Girls Inc. also endorses Roe v. Wade — the right to abortion and it promotes acceptance of homosexuality. It's an association that families like the Wiesners are protesting with their wallets."

"The Pro-Life Action League is calling for a boycott of the dolls. Some Catholic schools have cancelled American Girl events.

"They take a position that I am 100 percent against which would be in telling girls abortion is a solution for them," Wiesner says.""

bing.com/search?q=The+Pro-Life+Action+League+American+Doll&FORM=SOLTDF&pc=SOLTDF&src=IE-SearchBox


#12

American Girl Controversy Update
By @prolifeblogs on October 21, 2005 10:00 AM

"In what could be the first official boycott of the hugely popular American Girl doll company, the Chicago-based Pro-Life Action League has announced that it will give the doll company two weeks to sever ties with a pro-abortion "sister" organization known as Girls Inc. - MichNews

Now we discover that the parent company is taking some of the proceeds and directing them to Girls Inc., an organization with far different values than those we teach and try to model. However, it takes a bit of looking to find the problems; on the surface, supporting Girls Inc. sounds like a fine idea for a values-conscious company.

prolifeblogs.com/articles/archives/2005/10/american_girl_c.php


#13

October 17, 2005

Douglas R. Scott, president of Life Decisions International, today called on Girls Incorporated to "end its ties to Planned Parenthood, the world's primary abortion-advocacy empire." He also urged Girls Inc.'s leadership to "immediately stop pushing a pro-abortion agenda on young girls."

"Girls Inc. presents itself as a wholesome, altruistic group that seeks to help girls grow into strong, self-confident women. While this goal appears laudable on its face, Girls Inc. is not shy about stressing its pro-abortion position and its association with Planned Parenthood."

The following text is an "Advocacy Statement" released by Girls Inc. that is titled, "Reproductive Freedom":

Girls Incorporated affirms that girls and young women should make responsible decisions about sexuality, pregnancy and parenthood.

We recognize the right of all women to choose whether, when, and under what circumstances to bear children. Reproductive freedom and responsibility are essential to other rights and opportunities, including pursuit of education, employment, financial security and a stable and fulfilling family life. Restrictions of reproductive choice are especially burdensome for young women and poor women. Girls Incorporated supports a woman's freedom of choice, a constitutional right established by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1973 in Roe vs. Wade.

"You can't get any clearer than that," Scott said about the Statement. "Parents be warned: Girls Inc. is not simply an advocacy group for girls; it is an advocacy group for abortion."

Another Girls Inc. Advocacy Statement is headed "Sexuality":

Girls Incorporated encourages all girls to develop positive sexual identities and to function comfortably as responsible sexual beings. We recognize that the family is the primary source of information about sex and we help girls and young women communicate with their families about sexuality.

To make responsible decisions about sexuality, pregnancy and parenthood, girls need and have a right to sensitive, truthful sexuality education; convenient access to safe, effective methods of contraception and protection from disease; and referral to comprehensive information, counseling, clinical and other services that support their responsible decisions. We recognize that any sizable group of girls includes those who face issues related to their sexual orientation or that of a family member and who face discrimination based on this sexual orientation. Girls have a right to positive, supportive environments and linkages to community resources for dealing with issues of sexual orientation.

"It's time that adults with an agenda stop using children as their personal guinea pigs," Scott said. "Girls Inc. should stick to providing real and universally accepted tools for girls to grow up strong and proud. The so-called �right' to be sexually active and to kill their children will empower no one. It will simply set these young people up for a fall. And the adults at Girls Inc. will intimately be responsible for each tragedy."

Scott has called on Mattel Inc. to instruct its American Girl subsidiary to stop supporting Girls Inc. "It is not in the best interest of any corporation to get involved in such a controversial issue," Scott said. "Mattel needs to stand down and stop giving its money and corporate endorsement to Girls Inc."

Life Decisions International (LDI) is dedicated to challenging the Culture of Death, concentrating on exposing and fighting the agenda of Planned Parenthood. LDI's chief project is a boycott of corporations that fund the abortion-committing giant. To learn more about Planned Parenthood, please visit: fightpp.org/show.cfm?page=wrong


#14

[quote="BBCCBBCC, post:1, topic:217226"]
I am looking for advise on the dolls and web site activities. My 7 and 9 year olds both want the american dolls for christmas and I need to know if they are appropiate and promote good values for my daughterrs before i spend 200 dollars or the dolls - all and any reviews are appreciated.:)

[/quote]

Not sure what message a $200 doll sends to 7 and 9 year olds. But I guess it's appropriate if you're wealthy.


#15

I LOVE American Girls dolls! Absolutely love them!

Both of my daughters loved and still love their American Girls dolls! (My daughters are now 27 and 24.)

The books are absolutely delightful, written in the style of the Little House books and Anne of Green Gables. I am pretty sensitive to "feminist propaganda" in girls' literature, as I read a lot of this genre and WRITE it (see my signature website). I can honestly attest that I see NO FEMINIST PROPAGANDA or hidden anti-religion messages in the American Girls books. They are about family life and traditional virtues like courage, loyalty, hard work, love of country, and love of family and friends. Religion is not disparaged in any way.

Yes, of course a family can get caught up in the "materialistic" aspect of American Girls. A typical little girl will want every outfit and every accessory in the catalogue for her doll. But there's nothing evil about this! It only becomes evil when you cannot be happy accepting what you have and waiting for what you don't have. What we used to do was buy an outfit and/or accessories on birthdays and Christmas. We didn't go into debt paying for the "entire package." It was a lot of fun for our daughters and us, looking forward to what they would receive.

Also, a lot of girls work at chores and save their money to buy the outfits themselves. That's even more fun for them.

The books are very cheap. And there is a whole line of American Girls "mysteries" that are excellent reading even for adults. Very well-written and suspenseful with a lot of history and geography included. No "occult" stuff.

And you can buy or make imitation American Girls dresses and accessories. A lot of craft shows features booths full of homemade American Girls outfits, and they are a lot cheaper than the outfits in the catalogues. Most little girls really don't care if the outift is "genuine label" or not. They just want to keep changing the clothes (and there's nothing wrong with that. Women never grow out of that!)

I will say this--the Pleasant Company, the company that designs and manufactures American Girls dolls and accessories, has been associated with a campaign to approve of homosexuality. You will have to do some searching to find out the specifics. I don't have the time to do the looking for you this morning, but you'll find it if you do some googling.

I personally think it's really too bad, but it wouldn't stop me from buying the dolls and accessories. Almost all secular companies in the United States have been forced to buy into the "pro-gay" agenda; in my hospital, we are expected to not only tolerate gay issues, but also "celebrate diversity." Anyone who speaks against homosexuality can be fired without a warning and without a probation (it's in our written policies). This same policy is in place in many companies, and many companies join in with community "pro-gay" activities in order to appease gay rights groups and not lose business (if they lose business, they have to fire employees, and that's not good). So they bite the bullet. I think that American Girls is possibly in this same situation. *I personally feel that buying the dolls does not endorse the gay rights agenda, but I can understand why others might feel that they are endorsing the gay rights agenda. Just do the research and make up your own mind according to the dictates of your conscience. *
Remember, you can no doubt buy the dolls used on Ebay, and that might set better with your conscience.


#16

I spent many hours reading American Girl stories with my daughter. We bought her many American Girl books. Mercifully, she never wanted a doll very badly, so we didn't have to buy any dolls.

From the point of view of the books, some of them are much better than others.

[LIST]
*]Josefina is Catholic. In Josefina's Surprise, she participates in liturgical procession.
*]I don't know if Kirsten even has a doll, but Kirsten's Surprise included traditional celebration of St. Lucia (the one mentioned in Roman Canon, I think)
*]By contrast, Felicity was not very interesting. She seemed kinda anachronistic. That is, as literary character she's just a typical american girl of today wearing old-fashioned clothes.
*]Along the sames lines, many of the newer dolls appear to drop pretense of being historical characters. I think you're right to hesitate about those.
[/LIST]

ASD

Traditional Latin Mass: Translation and Grammar


#17

[quote="NewsTheMan, post:2, topic:217226"]
I don't have kids; I am a guy; I don't know what dolls you are specifically talking about and I don't play with dolls. But here's my short opinion.

No. They mostly teach young girls that immodesty is cool. That it's all about 'accessorizing' and having flashy things. That everything is orientated towards the opposite sex. That being spoilt is 'fun' and 'exciting' and being a brat is the best thing to be.

[/quote]

No, no...these aren't the typical Barbie and Bratz dolls...they actually are dolls that are tastefully done, and represent a child in a period of history, and the child actually has a name and back story....I don't know too terribly much about them, as I have a boy, but....they aren't what you are thinking of:D

Let me try and find a link with info for you...they seem rather interesting...as to the Barbie dolls...pfft.
I got one for the holidays when I was a kid, and I promptly beheaded her...I wasn't much into dolls, I thought books, music and trucks and blocks were cool.
(yes, I have a warped brain;0)
Here's a link to some of them...
store.americangirl.com/agshop/static/character.jsp
I would think they are rather cute. If I were 9 again, I'd love one of those dolls...


#18

"Josefina is Catholic. In Josefina's Surprise, she participates in liturgical procession."

What got me interested in the American Girl brand was that I found the Josefina book at Good Will. I was putting together a Christmas theme box for a young Catholic who has Spanish heritage.

That Josefina book is an excellent depiction of the Christmas procession in Mexico.

I was very disappointed, months later to read that the American Girl company gifts their profits toward furthering abortion and homosexuality.


#19

I had an American girl doll growing up (the one you can design to look like you by specifying hair and eye color), but few accesories for it because they were SO expensive. I never ended up playing with it much because honestly I was never really into dolls, but I loved the historical stories that go with them. I think the biggest benefit to American Girls is promoting a love of history.
However, I would stay away from the new character Julie they created with a line of stories about her life growing up in the 70s. I read the first one, and it talks about how divorce is normal and feminism is good (among many other things, Julie is impressed and inspired by her teacher who refuses to go by ‘Mrs.’ and instaed goes by ‘Ms.’ to fight sexism against married women.) Everything bad that came out of the '60s and '70s is in there. The rest of the girls (Josephina, Molly, etc.) are just fine.
Also be aware that all the other mailings and magazines for girls, etc. that come from the American Girl company (which you will automatically get if you order a doll) heavily promote “girl power” and feminist thinking. When I was in girl scouts and was reading all the American Girl magazine, I remember slowly being drawn into feminism. I was made aware of the “oppresion” of women by men and was told I needed to fight against it. Thank goodness my family moved when I was in 4th grade and we never bothered to give them my new address and I never found another girl scout troup! I might have ended up like a friend I have who learned to hate men as a young girl, and now she just announced she is a lesbian because she says she can never be in a relationship with a chauvinist pig, (which in her mind is all males). :rolleyes: My friend is an extreme case and there’s no guarantee at all that your daughter will get drawn that far into it, but you should always be aware of what your daughter is learning from girl-centric companies that are almost always feminist to some degree and actively work against it.
My biggest fear about American Girl is that, if what the other poster said is true, the parent company supports Roe v. Wade and donates money to pro-abortion groups. Some people don’t mind because they say that if we avoid all companies that support evil causes, there would be only a small list of companies that are okay to buy from. I personally would never buy anything from a company I know will donate my money to a pro-abortion or pro-gay groups even if that meant never buying anything again! It’s just unnaceptable to me. It’s a personal choice, though.
Fortunately, I have seen American Girl knock-offs at Target. I would personally get a second-hand American Girl doll, get all the accesories at Target, and rent the books from the library. You would literally save hundreds of dollars that way.


#20

My daughter has an American Girl doll (the just-like-me variety), and I think it’s wonderful. Unlike so many of the other dolls out there (although, as noted, there are knock-off dolls available at Target, and I believe Walmart as well because the AG dolls are expensive), it really does seem to help promote a ‘girls being little girls’ a little bit longer (my daughter is 9-1/2 and showing no signs of letting up interest in playing with her doll) rather than pushing them forward into the glitzy fashion/accessory/make up of some of the other dolls out there. As far as the stories–pick and choose, but the stories for the dolls from decades prior to the 70s seem pretty wholesome.


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